A rogue assassin is taking out military leaders, and Brandon gets word that his father is one. He tries to track down the killer, finds out that his father isn't dead and realizes that his superior officers are using him as bait to track the killer.

Director:

Don Michael Paul

Writers:

Michael Frost Beckner (based on characters created by), Crash Leyland (based on characters created by) | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Tom Berenger ... Thomas Beckett
Chad Michael Collins ... Brandon Beckett
Doug Allen ... Simpson
Dominic Mafham ... Bidwell
Mercedes Mason ... Sanaa (as Mercedes Masohn)
Mark Lewis Jones ... Shope
Nestor Serrano ... Steffen
Dennis Haysbert ... The Colonel
Alex Roe ... Reese
Yana Marinova ... Crane
George Zlatarev George Zlatarev ... The Sirian (as Joro Zlatarev)
Woon Young Park ... Cantara
Patrick Garrity Patrick Garrity ... Reese's Spotter
Nikolay Chilov Nikolay Chilov ... The Captain
Danko Jordanov ... Sentry
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Storyline

A rogue assassin is taking out military leaders, and Brandon gets word that his father is one. He tries to track down the killer, finds out that his father isn't dead and realizes that his superior officers are using him as bait to track the killer.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Action | Thriller | War

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong violence, and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Dennis Haybert makes a comment to Tom Berenger about 25 years ago. 25 years before this movie was released another movie with Dennis and Tom was released, Major League. See more »

Goofs

When Reese is pursuing Simpson, the objective lens cap on his scope varies between open and closed as the scene cuts from one shot to another. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Cinema Snob: Robot Wars (2014) See more »

Soundtracks

Back up
Written by Derek Steele and Jesse Williams
Performed by Southpaw Swagger
Courtesy of Method House
Records/Position Music
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User Reviews

 
Still entertains but misses its mark compared to Sniper: Reloaded (2011)

It really is amazing to how some franchises continue to thrive on after so long. Sniper (1993), Sniper 2 (2002) & Sniper 3 (2004) were all films that belonged to actor Tom Berenger. As Master Gunnery Sergeant Thomas Beckett, Berenger solidified his presence as the man behind this franchise. There's no other way to explain it, the Sniper film series must have a loyal following. And although the quality did slip initially, the stories have slowly progressed into a decent franchise. Fans were even more surprised when producers released Sniper: Reloaded (2011) with no Berenger but instead brought in young actor Chad Michael Collins and veteran actor from the original, Billy Zane. Not only did it surpass its two previous entries but also it brought up questions to how it would continue after that. Well here we are and wow. Another solid entry even though it did not exceed Sniper: Reloaded (2011).

Characters are hard to revive, especially when they go AWOL. Yet, this movie somehow achieves this in Tron: Legacy (2010) fashion (coincidentally along with the title). Out of nowhere, Beckett (Berenger) returns to greatness teaming up with his son and others to take out a deadly assassin who has gone rogue. If there's one character fans will be most happy to see, it's Tom Berenger. To be honest, with the previous movie I thought Berenger was done with the franchise. Apparently not and the interesting thing is, it's like Berenger never stopped being Beckett. He hasn't lost the attitude nor the mannerisms. As for others, Chad Michael Collins continues to be competent in his acting ability and its nice to see him finally meet up with his long lost father. Sadly, the topic of characters is where John Fasano's writing falters.

Even though audiences will finally see Brandon and Tom Beckett reunited, there are several missed opportunities for proper character development of these individuals. For example, where has Beckett been? Why did he leave Brandon? These are crucial questions to help the Beckett family reconcile past problems. Instead, it is initiated but scooted aside abruptly. Most audiences want an emotional attachment to their characters. By brushing it aside, your brushing aside what makes the character the character. There's also issues of unexplained plot holes. Questions like does he still have that finger stigmatism that began giving him problems from Sniper 3 (2004)? What happened to Lieutenant Ellen Abramowitz (Brandon's secret lover) and Richard Miller (Billy Zane) from Sniper: Reloaded (2011)? All these questions needed were quick logical answers, but are ignored through and through. The late Fasano was a decent writer, I guess going over these particular matters were not accepted by the producers or director Don Michael Paul. I don't know who, but they should've gone in this direction for a little bit.

Any of the new characters like Doug Allen, Dennis Haysbert, Dominic Mafham and Mercedes Mason perform respectively. It would've been nice though if the story stuck with one girl because Mason's character comes off like a love interest to Brandon but doesn't express it. If she was in Sniper: Reloaded (2011) then it would not have mattered because the audience would be able to remember from the prior film her relationship with Brandon. The same goes for the actress who played Lieutenant Ellen Abramowitz in the last sequel. Dominic Mafham had an interesting character portrayal. He resembled that of a good knock-off of Clive Owen. Dennis Haysbert doesn't get heavily involved but he does play a significant role and that's appreciated.

The action was nicely paced throughout. It was not as bloody as Sniper: Reloaded (2011) but it still entertained. This time, the action also included several firefights. Not just between Snipers but AK-47s and other hand-held machine guns. As for camera-work, Martin Chichov achieved some beautiful scenery such as shorelines, urban terrain and grasslands. It's also nice how each Sniper film has changed locations around the entire world. Sniper (1993) was in Central America, Sniper 2 (2002) was in Europe, Sniper 3 (2004) was in Asia, Sniper: Reloaded (2011) was in Africa and this film takes place in the Middle East. The music by Frederik Wiedmann was appropriate. When there was action there was plenty of strings and percussion. But because there were barely any emotional scenes, it was hard to hear anything soft enough. However, because of the location Wiedmann did include several tracks that sounded appropriate for the setting and it felt authentic. It's not the best sequel but it is a good one.

It's writing misses several moments to develop its characters the way they should be, along with unexplained details from the last entry. Yet, the return of Tom Berenger feels too gratifying to be upset over for too long. The actors perform decently, the action, music and camera-work are all well staged.


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Details

Country:

USA | Bulgaria

Language:

English

Release Date:

23 February 2015 (Sweden) See more »

Also Known As:

Sniper: Legacy See more »

Filming Locations:

Bulgaria See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Color:

Color
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