7.4/10
375
4 user 23 critic

The Wife (2017)

R | | Drama | 17 August 2018 (USA)
Trailer
2:26 | Trailer
A wife questions her life choices as she travels to Stockholm with her husband, where he is slated to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay by), (based on the novel "The Wife" by)
Reviews
Popularity
229 ( 190)

Videos

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.9/10 X  

A documentary about internationally renowned film editor Jill Bilcock, that charts how an outspoken arts student in 1960s Melbourne became one of the world's most acclaimed film artists.

Director: Axel Grigor
Stars: Jill Bilcock, Cate Blanchett, Baz Luhrmann
Comedy
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

Two women cynical in love, set up an agency to break couples up as a way to avoid letting go and moving on with their lives.

Directors: Madeleine Sami, Jackie van Beek
Stars: Madeleine Sami, Jackie van Beek, James Rolleston
Juliet, Naked (2018)
Comedy | Drama | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.9/10 X  

Juliet, Naked is the story of Annie (the long-suffering girlfriend of Duncan) and her unlikely transatlantic romance with once revered, now faded, singer-songwriter, Tucker Crowe, who also happens to be the subject of Duncan's musical obsession.

Director: Jesse Peretz
Stars: Rose Byrne, Ethan Hawke, Chris O'Dowd
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

As her marriage crumbles, a judge must decide a case involving a teenage boy who is refusing a blood transfusion on religious principle.

Director: Richard Eyre
Stars: Emma Thompson, Stanley Tucci, Fionn Whitehead
Funny Cow (2017)
Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

A comedian uses her troubled past as material for her stand-up routine, trying to rise up through the comedy circuit by playing Northern England's working men's clubs.

Director: Adrian Shergold
Stars: Stephen Graham, Paddy Considine, Maxine Peake
Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
... Nathaniel Bone
... David Castleman
... Joan Castleman
... Elaine Mozell
... Young Joe Castleman
... Joe Castleman
... Young Joan Castleman
... Susannah Castleman
... Linnea
... White
... Hotel Nurse
... King Gustav
... Monica
... Hotel Doctor
Jane Garioni ... Constance Finch
Edit

Storyline

Behind any great man, there's always a greater woman - and you're about to meet her. It is crucial you get to know this woman - many of us already do and don't even realise it. Joan Castleman (Glenn Close): a highly intelligent and still-striking beauty - the perfect devoted wife. Forty years spent sacrificing her own talent, dreams and ambitions to fan the flames of her charismatic husband Joe (Jonathan Pryce) and his skyrocketing literary career. Ignoring his infidelities and excuses because of his "art" with grace and humour. Their fateful pact has built a marriage upon uneven compromises. And Joan's reached her breaking point. On the eve of Joe's Nobel Prize for Literature, the crown jewel in a spectacular body of work, Joan's coup de grace is to confront the biggest sacrifice of her life and secret of his career. The Wife is a poignant, funny and emotional journey; a celebration of womanhood, self-discovery and liberation. Written by anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Behind any great man, there's always a greater woman

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and some sexual content | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

| |

Language:

Release Date:

17 August 2018 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Mulher  »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Close and Pryce rehearsed around a table for a week before shooting began on the film. See more »


Soundtracks

Let's Fly Away
Written by Joe Lervold & Julius Robinson
Performed by Joel Evans Big Band featuring Patrick Tuzzolino
Courtesy of Capp Records & MusicSupervisor.com
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
An orginal tale of mid-life self-discovery
19 June 2018 | by See all my reviews

The Wife (2017) could be described as just another midlife self-discovery film, although with more originality and powerful acting than many. It can also be seen as a feminist essay about being true to oneself, a story of fabricated prestige in the literary world, and a tale of arrogant deceit that holds a marriage together. It's bigger triumph, however, lies in the way it blends all of these into a tense black comedic drama based on the extraordinary acting power of the duo Glen Close and Jonathan Price.

The core plot is simple: a long-term marriage full of simmering tensions is brought to the boil when the husband wins the Nobel Prize for literature while 'the wife' looks on in smiling silence. Professor Joe Castleman has become accustomed to being feted for his literary greatness and has even been described as a reinventor of the novel form. The opening scenes are emotionally supercharged: a phone call from Norway in the middle of the night, joyful close-ups on Joe and Joan hearing the news, each processing it in completely different terms. Joe's arrogance is elevated by the news, while Joan's tolerance for his deceit, philandering, and belittling her as 'the wife who does not write' inches closer to breaking point.

The news of his Prize triggers interest from a persistent freelance biographer who begins asking questions about Joan's own early writing career and the authorship of her husband's work. Marital tensions and professional conceits intersect and escalate as they approach the Nobel Prize ceremony, with their secret dangerously close to becoming public. Framed as a domestic relationships drama, the narrative moves slowly in a dialogue-rich film that records the personal journey of two intelligent and articulate people travelling in different directions.

So much can be conveyed through a husband's use of the phrase "The Wife". It might be used as a derisive avatar or a cartoon nagger but not a respected equal. It is at this level that The Wifeexerts its power to show how patriarchy can entrap a willing victim until its innate fragility is exposed. Yet a simple exit from the marriage is not easy, as Joe and Joan really love each other. Too many dramas immerse such themes in clichés and hyperbole, but a tour de forceperformance by Glen Close takes this one to different level.

Excellent filming, a clever script, uncluttered editing, and a nomination-worthy performance by Close gives this film a clear voice for the demographic it addresses. The feminist discourse for older women speaks in a different filmic language than what is current for others, so this is not a film for all. But its laser-precise message is targeted at everyone.


27 of 27 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 4 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed