7.0/10
5
1 user

The Next Big Thing (2014)

Not Rated | | Documentary, News | March 2014 (Netherlands)
Over the last few years, the world of the contemporary arts has been subjected to drastic change. Our modern-day taste is no longer determined by the great museums or by the critics but by ... See full summary »
Reviews

Photos

Edit

Storyline

Over the last few years, the world of the contemporary arts has been subjected to drastic change. Our modern-day taste is no longer determined by the great museums or by the critics but by dealers and mega rich collectors. This film looks into the transformation of the art world and the consequences this shift of power is having on artists, collectors, dealers, museums and the history of art. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary | News

Certificate:

Not Rated

User Reviews

 
What not to call a film...
7 July 2019 | by skepticskepticalSee all my reviews

The Next Big Thing turns out to be the title of a bunch of movies and other stuff. This documentary echoes (or precedes) Blurred Lines and The Price of Everything. It is all about the effects of the explosion in fine art prices brought about by the massive increase of extremely wealthy people looking to invest in art in the manner in which they invest in other commodities. Art has always had a value to collectors, but now the set of all collectors contains more and more people who have no real interest in art but instead engage in speculation, stalking young artists still in art school to see whether they can become The Next Big Thing, which they do, for a time, with sometimes dire consequences later on down the line. In some ways, this was the story of Basquiat, but it is happening more frequently and although Basquiat´s paintings continue to command absurdly high auction prices, most artists in similar situations will be forgotten when this bubble bursts at some yet to be determined point in the future...

One somewhat amusing aspect of this particular take is the emphasis given to gallerists and collectors who clearly view themselves as morally superior to the pure speculators--those who view art only as a business. Let us be perfectly frank: gallerists are, too, engaged in business, what has now become Big Business. Contemporary gallerists profit parasitically from artists in the very manner in which forgers do. Are they morally superior to them? Do they deserve to keep as much--or far more--from an art sale than the creator of the piece? Are not gallerists themselves complicit in precisely what has happened to the art market in recent decades?


0 of 0 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See one user review »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

Netherlands | USA | Germany

Language:

English

Release Date:

March 2014 (Netherlands) See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Zeppers Film & TV, NTR See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page

Your Next Binge Watch Awaits

Looking for something to watch? Check out IMDb's "What to Watch" series to find out what's really worth watching.



Recently Viewed