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Human, All Too Human 

Human, All Too Human is a three-part 1999 documentary television series co-produced by the BBC and RM Arts.[1] It follows the lives of three prominent European philosophers: Friedrich ... See full summary »
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1999  

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Cast

Series cast summary:
Haydn Gwynne ...  Narrator 3 episodes, 1999
Ronald Hayman Ronald Hayman ...  Himself - Biographer 2 episodes, 1999
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Storyline

Human, All Too Human is a three-part 1999 documentary television series co-produced by the BBC and RM Arts.[1] It follows the lives of three prominent European philosophers: Friedrich Nietzsche, Martin Heidegger and Jean-Paul Sartre.[1] The theme revolves heavily around the school of philosophical thought known as Existentialism, although the term had not been coined at the time of Nietzsche's writing and Heidegger declaimed the label. The documentary is named after the 1878 book written by Nietzsche, titled Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free Spirits (in German: Menschliches, Allzumenschliches: Ein Buch für freie Geister).[2] Written by Wiki

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tv mini series | See All (1) »

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Biography

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Official Sites:

Official Site

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

1999 (UK) See more »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(3 episodes)

Color:

Color
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User Reviews

 
Interesting overview
14 February 2014 | by roffles-263-184489See all my reviews

Being curious about Nietzsche led me to watch this series. Broadly I did enjoy finding out more about the three philosophers, but I would have liked a more detailed exposition of each individual's philosophy.

The Nietzsche episode gave a mix of philosophy and biography, which actually worked well to give each other context. The Heidegge episode focused exclusively on his life (and particularly on his involvement with the Nazi party). This was quite a let-down, and left me with no real idea what it was that he actually philosophised about. The Sartre episode gave a more balanced mix again, showing how his personal philosophy affected the way he lived.

I would recommend watching the Nietzsche and Sartre episodes and ignoring the Heidegge one.


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