The story of the five-day interview between Rolling Stone reporter David Lipsky and acclaimed novelist David Foster Wallace, which took place right after the 1996 publication of Wallace's groundbreaking epic novel, 'Infinite Jest.'

Director:

James Ponsoldt

Writers:

Donald Margulies (screenplay), David Lipsky (book)
4 wins & 18 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Credited cast:
Jason Segel ... David Foster Wallace
Jesse Eisenberg ... David Lipsky
Anna Chlumsky ... Sarah
Joan Cusack ... Patty
Ron Livingston ... David Lipsky's Editor
Mickey Sumner ... Betsy
Mamie Gummer ... Julie
Becky Ann Baker ... Bookstore Manager
Jennifer Jelsema ... Hotel Front Desk Clerk
Carrie Bradstreet ... Airline Ticket Agent
Dan John Miller ... NPR Host
Alexander Christopher Jones ... Bookstore couple
Scott Stangland Scott Stangland ... Party Friend 1
Rammel Chan ... Student #3
Maria Wasikowski ... P.A.
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Storyline

The story of the five-day interview between Rolling Stone reporter David Lipsky and acclaimed novelist David Foster Wallace, which took place right after the 1996 publication of Wallace's groundbreaking epic novel, 'Infinite Jest.'

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Imagine the greatest conversation you've ever had.

Genres:

Biography | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language including some sexual references | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Screenwriter Donald Margulies was one of director James Ponsoldt's playwriting teachers in college. See more »

Goofs

When Lipsky and Wallace arrive at the airport's parking lot to fly to Minnesota, only the characters' car has residue of snow under the windshield. If this was truly the snow-filled environment the film portrays, surely other cars would also show signs of this. See more »

Quotes

David Foster Wallace: There's a thing in the book about how when somebody leaps from a burning skyscraper, it's not that they're not afraid of falling anymore, it's that the alternative is so awful. And so then you're invited to consider what could be so awful that leaping to your death would seem like an escape from it. I don't know if you have any experience with this kind of thing. But it's worse than any kind of physical injury. It may be in the old days what was known as a spiritual crisis: feeling as though ...
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Crazy Credits

Halfway through the closing credits, there is an extra scene told from the perspective of David Foster Wallace as Lipsky goes to the bathroom to wash out the chewing tobacco. It shows what Wallace did while he was in the bathroom: he speaks privately into the tape recorder. See more »

Connections

References Happy Gilmore (1996) See more »

Soundtracks

Gold Soundz
Written by Stephen Malkmus
Performed by Pavement (as PAVEMENT)
Courtesy of Matador Records
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User Reviews

 
How do these 'kids' channel men of another era so well?
16 April 2015 | by socrates99See all my reviews

We're currently attending a film festival and this is one of the featured films. My first indication that this might be more than I expected was the line of young people, including many young women, who were interested in getting what amounts to stand by tickets for the showing that featured an after movie panel discussion with Jason Segel and the director, James Ponsoldt. Now, I only know of Segel's work and haven't seen much of it. He isn't a particular attraction for me, but after seeing this movie, I'm quite sold on his ability especially when nurtured by the sensibilities of Mr Ponsoldt. The director read Mr Wallace's greatest work 'Infinite Jest' back when it first came out to huge success and makes sure you get a glimpse of the man's ability and charm.

Probably the only unfortunate part of all this is that this movie is not going to have wide appeal. It is almost exclusively about the real life meeting between a Rolling Stone journalist and newly minted super-author David Foster Wallace, back in the 90s. As such it is almost all dialog meant to convey a sense of Mr Wallace's breadth of knowledge about popular culture and his imagination.

There's little drama or action here in the usual sense. Still Mr Segel is most effective in breathing life into the man such that you would love to have known him. Even his co-star, Jesse Eisenberg, who I don't usually warm up to, is quite up to the task at hand, i.e., sparring with the great author to get the real man down on paper.

I loved the film, but I must make special mention that, for a film filled with dialog, for once, I caught every word. There was no asking my wife, what did he say? Why can't every film be as carefully constructed?


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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

12 November 2015 (Brazil) See more »

Also Known As:

The End of the Tour See more »

Filming Locations:

Boston, Massachusetts, USA See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$123,238, 2 August 2015

Gross USA:

$3,002,884

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$3,072,991
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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