7.3/10
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93 user 185 critic

The End of the Tour (2015)

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The story of the five-day interview between Rolling Stone reporter David Lipsky and acclaimed novelist David Foster Wallace, which took place right after the 1996 publication of Wallace's groundbreaking epic novel, 'Infinite Jest.'

Director:

James Ponsoldt

Writers:

Donald Margulies (screenplay), David Lipsky (book)
4 wins & 17 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Credited cast:
Anna Chlumsky ... Sarah
Joan Cusack ... Patty
Jason Segel ... David Foster Wallace
Jesse Eisenberg ... David Lipsky
Mamie Gummer ... Julie
Ron Livingston ... David Lipsky's Editor
Mickey Sumner ... Betsy
Becky Ann Baker ... Bookstore Manager
Carrie Bradstreet ... Airline Ticket Agent
Dan John Miller ... NPR Host
Rammel Chan ... Student #3
Jennifer Jelsema ... Hotel Front Desk Clerk
Johnny Otto Johnny Otto ... Pilot
Stephanie Cotton ... United Ticket Agent
Punnavith Koy ... Movie Goer
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Storyline

The story of the five-day interview between Rolling Stone reporter David Lipsky and acclaimed novelist David Foster Wallace, which took place right after the 1996 publication of Wallace's groundbreaking epic novel, 'Infinite Jest.'

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Imagine the greatest conversation you've ever had.

Genres:

Biography | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language including some sexual references | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

12 November 2015 (Brazil) See more »

Also Known As:

A turné vége See more »

Filming Locations:

Boston, Massachusetts, USA See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$123,238, 2 August 2015, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$2,993,669, 13 December 2015
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The two women with whom Wallace and Lipsky hang out in Minnesota are both played by daughters of international celebrities: Julie is played by Mamie Gummer (a daughter of Meryl Streep) and Betsy is played by Mickey Sumner (one of Sting's daughters). See more »

Goofs

When the two arrived at the airport parking lot at the start of their trip to the Twin Cities, they drive past a Subaru Outback with a body style that was not introduced until 2010. See more »

Quotes

David Foster Wallace: This piece would be so much better if it was just you. Just keep talking, you'll save me a lot of trouble.
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Crazy Credits

Halfway through the closing credits, there is an extra scene told from the perspective of David Foster Wallace as Lipsky goes to the bathroom to wash out the chewing tobacco. It shows what Wallace did while he was in the bathroom: he speaks privately into the tape recorder. See more »

Connections

References Die Hard (1988) See more »

Soundtracks

Recomearia
Written by Luiz Gabriel Lopes
Provided courtesy of Opus 1 Music
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User Reviews

 
A Conversation that Makes You Glad to be the Fly-on-the-Wall
31 August 2015 | by vsksSee all my reviews

In 1996 David Foster Wallace's 1079-page novel Infinite Jest hit the literary scene like a rocket. The publisher's marketing efforts meant the book was everywhere, but the man himself—shy, full of self-doubt, not wanting to be trapped into any literary poseur moments and seeing them as inevitable—was difficult to read. This movie uses a tyro journalist's eye to probe Wallace during an intense five days of interviewing toward the end of the Infinite Jest book tour. As a tryout writer for Rolling Stone, reporter David Lipsky had begged for the assignment to write a profile of Wallace, which ultimately the magazine never published. But the tapes survived, and after Wallace's suicide in 2008 they became the basis for Lipsky's 2010 book, Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself, which fed David Margulies screenplay. The plot of the movie is minimal; instead, it's a deep exploration of character. It may just be two guys talking, but I found it tectonic. Director James Ponsoldt has brought nuanced, intelligent performances from his two main actors—Jason Segel as Wallace and Jesse Eisenberg as reporter David Lipsky. Lipsky is a novelist himself, with a so-so book to his credit. Wallace has reached the heights, and what would it take for Lipsky to scramble up there too? Jealousy and admiration are at war within him and, confronted with Wallace's occasional oddness, one manifestation of which is the attempt to be Super-Regular Guy—owning dogs, eating junk food, obsessively watching television—he isn't sure what to feel. You see it on his face. Is Lipsky friend or foe? He's not above snooping around Wallace's house or chatting up his friends to nail his story. Lipsky rightly makes Wallace nervous, the tape recorder makes him nervous; he amuses, he evades, he delivers a punch of a line, he feints. When the going gets too rough, Lipsky falls back on saying, "You agreed to the interview," and Wallace climbs back in the saddle, as if saying to himself, just finish this awful ride, then back to the peace and solitude necessary actually to write. In the meantime, he is, as A. O. Scott said in his New York Times review, "playing the role of a writer in someone else's fantasy." The movie's opening scene delivers the fact of the suicide, which by design looms over all that follows, in the long flashback to a dozen years earlier and the failed interview. You can't help but interpret every statement of Wallace's through that lens. The depression is clear. He's been treated for it and for alcoholism, from which he seems to have recovered. The two Davids walk on the snow-covered farm fields of Wallace's Illinois home and talk about how beautiful it is, but it is bleak, and even in as jam-packed an environment as the Mall of America Wallace's conversation focuses on the emptiness at the heart of life. Yet his gentle humor infuses almost every exchange, and Lipsky can be wickedly funny too. Wallace can't help but feel great ambivalence toward Lipsky; he recognizes Lipsky's envy and his hero-worship, and both are troubling. He felt a truth inside himself, but he finds it almost impossible to capture and isn't sure he has, saying, "The more people think you're really great, the bigger your fear of being a fraud is." Infinite Jest was a widely praised literary success, but not to Wallace himself.


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