4.8/10
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182 user 210 critic

The Forest (2016)

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2:29 | Trailer

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A woman goes into Japan's Suicide Forest to find her twin sister, and confronts supernatural terror.

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925 ( 564)
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... Sara / Jess Price
... Rob
... Valerie
Osamu Tanpopo ... Homeless Man (as Tanpopo Osamu)
Yasuo Tobishima ... Sushi Chef
Ibuki Kaneda ... Mei (Schoolgirl)
Akiko Iwase ... Head Teacher
Kikuo Ichikawa ... Businessman
... Mayumi
Jozef Aoki ... Visitor Center Morgue Man
... Sakura (as Yuho Yamashita)
... Aiden
Gen Seto ... Narusawa Bartender
Terry Diab ... Grandma
Nadja Mazalica ... Sara / Jess (Age 6)
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Storyline

A woman goes into Japan's Suicide Forest to find her twin sister, and confronts supernatural terror.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Everyone comes here looking for a way out. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for disturbing thematic content and images | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

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Language:

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Release Date:

8 January 2016 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

El bosque siniestro  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$10,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$12,741,176, 10 January 2016, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$26,583,369, 13 March 2016

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$30,687,600, 22 February 2016
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The poster for the film features Natalie Dormer's face with the bottom half removed, and the dividing line forming a silhouette of treetops and dangling nooses. This bears a clear resemblance to an infamous image of the body of an actual suicide victim of the forest, a bald man found in such a decomposed state that his jaw had fallen off and strips of flesh were hanging from where it had been. The image is also replicated in the film, albeit in a slightly less grotesque form. See more »

Goofs

When Sara looks at the medicine bottle at Jess' room, it's labeled as Alprazolam 10 mg, prescribed to treat Anxiety. There are no alprazolam 10mg pills nor tablets. Available dosages are 0,25 mg, 0,5 mg, 1mg and 2mg. According to Vademecum, the maximum dosage of alprazolam to treat anxiety shouldn't be above 4mg/day. See more »

Quotes

Sara: I don't know if this forest made you psycho or you were always this crazy.
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Connections

References Grave Halloween (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

Japan
Written by Alex Banks and Hannah Thomas
Courtesy of Cavendish Music
Under license from 5 Alarm Music
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
The Forest
26 February 2016 | by See all my reviews

It was obvious that, sooner or later, someone was going to make a film about the legendary forest of Aokigahara, widely known as "the Suicide Forest" due to the big quantity of persons who commit that act there (between 50 and 100 each year, even though the Japanese government doesn't announce the total numbers anymore in order to reduce the fame of that site), maybe inspired by the book The Complete Suicide Manual, which recommended it as an ideal place to do that. But, well... leaving its origin aside, the subject is undoubtedly fascinating and disturbing. Pity that the film The Forest wasn't able to do anything interesting with it. From the beginning, The Forest displays many elements copied in the same degree from the old J-Horror and the Hollywood horror (strident music, nightmares, faces deformed digitally, etc.). And with those visual clichés and cheap thrills, The Forest advances until leading to an unnecessary twist which is more irritating than surprising, due to the arbitrary manipulation of events which doesn't even adequately solve the "mystery" of the damned forest. Another problem is the main character's characterization. As we can suppose, she's completely skeptical on the beginning before the warnings of the supernatural entities inhabiting the forest; her purpose is finding her twin sister, and she won't let any local superstitions to interfere in her mission. But she almost immediately recognizes the fact that, effectively, the uncountable suicides created a malignant atmosphere in the forest, and not everything is like it seems. And then, she stops believing, thinking that everything has a natural explanation. And then, she believes in ghosts again. And then, she doesn't. And then, she does. And that's how things proceed until I couldn't care less about the final answer, which ended up being irrelevant anyway, because of the previously mentioned twist. On the positive side, actress Natalie Dormer makes a good work in the dual role of Sara and Jesse, displaying equal credibility in the suspense sequences and the dramatic scenes she shares with her "sister" or the gallant in turn. And the forest in which most of the movie was shot (located in Serbia) is undoubtedly lugubrious and threatening, unlike the squalid Czech forests we have frequently see in similar horror films; pity that there are too many scenes in almost total darkness which avoid us from appreciating the most dismal details. In conclusion, I liked Dormer's performance and the Serbian locations, but I found The Forest a boring and uninteresting film in spite of that, and I can't recommend it.


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