5.7/10
37,203
121 user 158 critic

Regression (2015)

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2:12 | Trailer
A detective and a psychoanalyst uncover evidence of a satanic cult while investigating a young woman's terrifying past.
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2,913 ( 1,410)
1 win & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Ethan Hawke ... Bruce Kenner
Emma Watson ... Angela Gray
David Thewlis ... Kenneth Raines
Lothaire Bluteau ... Reverend Beaumont
Dale Dickey ... Rose Gray
David Dencik ... John Gray
Devon Bostick ... Roy Gray
Aaron Ashmore ... George Nesbitt
Peter MacNeill ... Police Chief Cleveland
Adam Butcher ... Brody
Jacob Neayem ... Charlie
Aaron Abrams ... Farrell
Catherine Disher ... Kate
Danielle Bourgon ... Secretary at Police Station
Julian Richings ... Tom
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Storyline

In Minnesota in the 1990s, a man is arrested and accused of having abused his daughter. Although he doesn't remember anything from the event, he pleads guilty. With the help of a psychologist, he'll relive those moments. Meanwhile, the local media hints the possibility that everything could have been a satanic cult's doing. Written by CarlosERM

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Fear always finds its victim.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for disturbing violent and sexual content, and for language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The story is set in the year 1990, the same year Emma Watson was born. See more »

Goofs

The poster of Polish Death/Black Metal Band Behemoth is from 2014 whereas the film is set in 1990. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
John Gray: [driving in the rain] Please God, help me. Please God, help me.
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Connections

Featured in Projector: Macbeth/Regression (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

That's Where the Blues Begin
Written by Thomm Jutz and Peter Cronin
Music Library & SFX SL / Audio Network Ltd
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User Reviews

 
Amenabar and Hawke Worked So Well Together Here!
22 October 2015 | by 3xHCCHSee all my reviews

For a long time, Alejandro Amenabar has been one of my favorite writer- directors for the twisted suspense thrillers. He was quite prolific at the turn of the century -- "Thesis" (1996), "Open Your Eyes" (1997) and his English-language debut "The Others" (2001). His biographical drama "The Sea Inside" won an Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film in 2004.

Since then though, his output had been sparse. That was why when I heard that he will be releasing a new film this year entitled "Regression," I made sure I went to watch it.

Seventeen-year old Angela Gray accuses her father of sexually abusing her. Detective Bruce Kenner is assigned to her case. The father meekly admits to the crime, but does not actually recall doing it. Kenner seeks the help of Psychology professor Kenneth Raines to elicit his repressed memories, as well as those of the other members of the Gray family, via hypnotic regression. What is revealed from these sessions are diabolical confessions of such disturbing nature that Kenner himself could not get them out of his own mind.

Ethan Hawke is such a good actor, really. From his feature debut in "Dead Poet's Society," then "Before Sunrise" (and its series), "Gattaca," "Sinister" to his Oscar-nominated performances in "Training Day" and "Boyhood," this guy can really portray the most ordinary characters and wind up making them very memorable. His intense take of the obsessed Bruce Kenner was riveting and infectious. His visions become our visions, his beliefs our beliefs. He had a flawless interactive rapport with Amenabar's camera, registering and conveying the anger, paranoia, confusion, and fear of his character so well on screen.

Emma Watson returns on her trajectory to becoming a serious movie actress after being sidelined by unfortunate roles in "This is the End" and "Noah." The talent and the promise are there, but the connection with her role as the troubled Angela was not as convincing as that of Hawke's. Her best performances were still those for Hermione Granger. Her young adult performances in films like "Perks of Being a Wallflower" and "The Bling Ring" had a certain unnatural stiffness in them, as it was again here as well.

Credible supporting performances were given by David Thewlis as the authoritative Prof. Raines and David Dencik as Angela's repentant father John. Going a bit over the top was Dale Dickey and her exaggeratedly demented performance as Angela's grandmother Rose. The strangest casting decision was that of Lothaire Bluteau as the priest Reverend Murray. He exuded such a creepy vibe, which of course may be the director's intention.

While "Regression" was still not on the same level of excellence as "Open Your Eyes" or "The Others," Alejandro Amenabar returned to form with this comeback project of sorts. The script, though weak and flawed in certain aspects (like motive, for one important example), was still logical and grounded despite dealing with controversial religious and psychological matters. The storytelling engages you despite the dark unpleasant topics and relentlessly morbid atmosphere. I am looking forward to the next Amenabar opus. I hope it does not take so many years anymore. 7/10


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Details

Official Sites:

Official site [Japan]

Country:

Spain | Canada | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

2 October 2015 (Spain) See more »

Also Known As:

Regression See more »

Filming Locations:

Toronto, Ontario, Canada See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$33,915, 7 February 2016

Gross USA:

$55,039

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$17,671,101
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Atmos

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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