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Hiding in the Light 

The Ship of the Imagination travels back in time to reveal 11th century Europe and North Africa during the golden age of Islam, when brilliant physicist Ibn al-Haytham discovered the ... See full summary »

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(inspired by "Cosmos: A Personal Voyage" written by), (inspired by "Cosmos: A Personal Voyage" written by) | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Episode credited cast:
... Himself - Host
... Ibn Al-Hazen (voice)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Kenn Ashe ... Paleolithic Caveman
... Guard (voice)
... Businesswoman
... Cab Driver
... Christopher Wren, Weichelberger
... Joseph von Fraunhofer
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Storyline

The Ship of the Imagination travels back in time to reveal 11th century Europe and North Africa during the golden age of Islam, when brilliant physicist Ibn al-Haytham discovered the scientific method and first understood how we see, and how light travels. Later, William Herschel discovers the infrared and the signature hidden in the light of every star, eventually unlocking one of the keys to the cosmos. Written by Anonymous

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Documentary

Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

6 April 2014 (USA)  »

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16:9 HD
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The imagery of atomic orbitals is a simplification. Electrons do not circle around the nucleus of an atom like planets around a star. See more »

Goofs

In the animation about Mozi ("Mo Tze"), you see "Yi bin shou" ("a book") written in Chinese characters on a supporting wooden column in a writing room. It is written in Simplified Chinese, not Traditional Chinese. See more »

Soundtracks

Rhapsody in Blue
Written by George Gershwin
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User Reviews

 
A Whole Spectrum of the Universe
12 July 2014 | by See all my reviews

This episode tells us that something overlooked by Newton could have led to the great science of astrophysics had he been just a bit more perceptive. He was investigating the light spectrum of basic sunlight, but didn't take it to the next level. It was discovered a hundred years later that all substances in the known universe are made up of the same elements. Once this was established, we could begin to define planets, stars, solar systems, galaxies, and other cosmic phenomena. Tyson takes us into a field of flowers and talks about light absorption. He talks about the many kinds of light, including microwaves and x-rays to see how the common objects of our lives can glisten with new being, given the proper instrumentation. This was a great episode, explaining something that I knew of but never understood.


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