7.6/10
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28 user 113 critic
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The story of the Soviet Union's famed Red Army hockey team through the eyes of its players.

Director:

Gabe Polsky

Writer:

Gabe Polsky
4 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Credited cast:
Scotty Bowman ... Himself
Herb Brooks ... Himself - US Olympic Coach (voice) (archive footage)
Don Cherry ... Himself - Hockey Commentator (voice) (archive footage)
Mark Deakins Mark Deakins ... (voice)
Alan Eagleson Alan Eagleson ... Himself - Hockey Agent (voice)
Lada Fetisov Lada Fetisov ... Herself - Wife Of Vladislav Fetisov
Viacheslav Fetisov ... Himself
Anatoli Karpov ... Himself
Alexei Kasatonov ... Himself
Vladimir Krutov ... Himself - Red Army Right Wing
Ken Kurtis Ken Kurtis ... (voice)
Lawrence Martin Lawrence Martin ... Himself - Journalist
Felix Nechepore ... Himself
Vladimir Pozner ... Himself
Igor Rabiner Igor Rabiner ... Himself - Journalist
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Storyline

Red Army is a feature documentary about the Soviet Union and the most successful dynasty in sports history: the Red Army hockey team. Told from the perspective of its captain Slava Fetisov, the story portrays his transformation from national hero to political enemy. From the USSR to Russia, the film examines how sport mirrors social and cultural movements and parallels the rise and fall of the Red Army team with the Soviet Union. Written by Anonymous

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Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for thematic material and language | See all certifications »
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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA | Russia

Language:

English | Russian

Release Date:

29 January 2015 (Germany) See more »

Also Known As:

L'armée rouge See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$20,100, 25 January 2015, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$694,600, 5 April 2015
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Quotes

(voice): [confused] Wait a second. Go Back. I don't get why Yazov let you leave the country, if he was mad at you.
Viacheslav Fetisov: I'm not a historian. My feeling was the country tried to change something, because it's Perestroika time, but he doesn't want changes. Everybody was afraid. It's understandable. It's like in a dark room, trying to find a dark cat. It's not funny.
[still confused]
(voice): Okay.
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Soundtracks

The Other Troika
Composed, Arranged & Performed by: Joel Pickard
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Compelling documentary.
14 September 2015 | by Sergeant_TibbsSee all my reviews

Sometimes sports can seem like they have a bloated sense of self-importance but it can resonate in the grand scheme of geopolitics. The Cold War was indeed an era of tension and it manifested itself most publicly when the Soviet Union brought its teams to North America. It wasn't just teams representing countries, but they were representing ways of life - America, the capitalist way of life, and the Soviet Union, the communist way of life. And ostensibly, those lifestyles determine who has the better players, at least that's what they wanted the teams to think. When you hear that a country has beaten Canada at hockey, you know that means business. However, the documentary Red Army shows how the Soviet Union team members, who are all world class athletes, become disenchanted with their leadership and are recruited over to American leagues.

As expected, the attitude of the Russians today in the interviews are amusing and intimidating. Director Gabe Polsky feeds off the candid moments he captures, even if that results in the participants condescending him. With very deliberate motions with the camera, he capitalises on moments that other directors would have considered an outtake. There's a sense of humour and a sense of danger constantly bubbling, and Polsky's collection of archive footage always perfectly illustrates the portrait that the anecdotes form. It shows a skill in hockey that I've never seen before and Polsky makes it quite poetic at times. However sometimes its drama is too boisterous, but it's only real crux is that with such a big team it's hard for it to stay focused and follow all its characters at once. While it's most likely drenched in bias coming from an American, but pushing politics aside, it's the individual lives that matter.

8/10


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