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Suffragette (2015)

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In 1912 London, a young working mother is galvanized into radical political activism supporting the right for women to vote, and is willing to meet violence with violence to achieve this end.

Director:

Sarah Gavron

Writer:

Abi Morgan
Reviews
Popularity
4,141 ( 210)
16 wins & 15 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Anne-Marie Duff ... Violet Miller
Grace Stottor ... Maggie Miller
Geoff Bell ... Norman Taylor
Carey Mulligan ... Maud Watts
Amanda Lawrence ... Miss Withers
Shelley Longworth Shelley Longworth ... Miss Samson
Adam Michael Dodd Adam Michael Dodd ... George Watts
Ben Whishaw ... Sonny Watts
Sarah Finigan ... Mrs Garston
Drew Edwards ... Male Laundry Worker
Lorraine Stanley ... Mrs Coleman
Romola Garai ... Alice Haughton
Adam Nagaitis ... Mr Cummins
Helena Bonham Carter ... Edith Ellyn
Finbar Lynch ... Hugh Ellyn
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Storyline

A drama that tracks the story of the foot soldiers of the early feminist movement, women who were forced underground to pursue a dangerous game of cat and mouse with an increasingly brutal State. These women were not primarily from the genteel educated classes, they were working women who had seen peaceful protest achieve nothing. Radicalized and turning to violence as the only route to change, they were willing to lose everything in their fight for equality - their jobs, their homes, their children and their lives. Maud was one such foot soldier. The story of her fight for dignity is as gripping and visceral as any thriller, it is also heart-breaking and inspirational. Written by Production

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Deeds not words See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some intense violence, thematic elements, brief strong language and partial nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Official site | Official site [Japan] | See more »

Country:

UK | France

Language:

English

Release Date:

12 October 2015 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

Las Sufragistas See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$14,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$76,244, 23 October 2015, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$4,693,356, 10 January 2016
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Ruby Films, Pathé, Film4 See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital | DTS

Color:

Color | Black and White (archive footage)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film takes place in 1912. See more »

Goofs

When the suffragettes are within the Central Lobby of the Houses of Parliament, several railings can be viewed on the windows in the background. These were not added to the windows until 1917, 5 years after the film is set, in tribute to the suffragettes who chained themselves to them in 1908. The railings used to be situated in the Ladies Gallery of the Commons but were removed so as to prevent similar political protests at the time. See more »

Quotes

Inspector Arthur Steed: I'm offering you a lifeline. Take it. Before its too late.
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Connections

Featured in 74th Golden Globe Awards (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

March of the Women
By Ethel Smyth and Cicely Hamilton
Publisher: Chester Music Ltd trading as J Curwen and Sons
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User Reviews

 
Get's my vote (with some reservations)
13 October 2015 | by bob-the-movie-manSee all my reviews

Whilst most men would agree that giving women the vote was a dreadful mistake (put that stone down ladies…. it's just a joke), the astonishing story behind the UK social upheaval that was the Suffragette movement is well overdue a serious cinematic treatment. And a serious treatment Sarah Gavron's new film most certainly is: you exit the cinema feeling about as wrung out as the linen in the heroine Maud's workhouse-style laundry.

Carey Mulligan plays Maud Watts, an ordinary and anonymous working woman who progressively gets sucked into the anarchic rabble-rousing of an East-end branch of the Pankhurst's Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU). With operations run out of a chemist's shop by Edith Ellyn (Helena Bonham Carter) and her sympathetic husband, Maud risks a criminal record and the shame associated with that to pursue her ideals. Police pressure is applied by special forces copper Arthur Steed (Harry Potter's Brendan Gleeson) and personal pressure is put on her by her husband (played by Ben Whishaw, soon to be seen again as 'Q') and her alleged fitness to be a mother to their young son George (Adam Michael Dodd). As politicians continue to ignore the issue, the actions build to one of the most historic events of the period.

The struggle is seen very much through the limited prism of this select group of women. But where I really liked this film is in the slow awakening of Maud's character. In many ways it is like the germination of a seed that we are seeing on the screen. She starts without any interest in the movement and even mid-way through the film she is adamant that she is "not a suffragette", despite evidence to the contrary. Mulligan is, as always, completely brilliant in the role.

The supporting cast are all strong with Gleeson being particularly watchable as the lawman with a grudging respect for Maud and her cause. Meryl Streep makes a powerful cameo as Emily Pankhurst: but it is a short and sweet performance. Maud's friend Violet (Anne-Marie Duff) is also outstanding, her gaunt face delivering a haunting performance.

Whilst there are some highly emotionally charged scenes in the film, in a political sense the film has a curious lack of passion at times. A keynote speech to Lloyd George for example should have been electric - yet the Abi Morgan's script doesn't quite do the scene justice and if I was the MP I wouldn't have been impressed (which perhaps was the point).

I also had issues with some of the cinematography. Carey Mulligan has such an expressive and photogenic face that extreme close ups should work brilliantly. And yet filming it with a hand-held camera produces a constantly shifting image which was extremely distracting. Elsewhere in the art department though 1912 London is beautifully recreated, through both special effects, costume and make-up.

Alexandre Desplat delivers a touching score with a clever underlying drumbeat of change.

Suffragette is a solid historical drama, that tells an important social tale… a tale that graphically illustrates how much the world has really changed, and changed for the better, in a mere hundred years. Above all, the film concludes with the astounding fact that Switzerland only gave women the vote in 1971 (and in fact with one canton holding out on local issues until 1991). Shameful!

(Please find the full graphical review at bob-the-movie-man.com and sign up to receive future reviews).


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