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10 Buildings That Changed America (2013)

10 Buildings That Changed America tells the stories of ten influential works of architecture, the people who imagined them, and the way these landmarks ushered in innovative cultural shifts throughout our society.
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Cast

Credited cast:
Geoffrey Baer Geoffrey Baer ... Himself - Host
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Storyline

10 Buildings That Changed America tells the stories of ten influential works of architecture, the people who imagined them, and the way these landmarks ushered in innovative cultural shifts throughout our society.

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Certificate:

TV-PG
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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

12 May 2013 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

WTTW Channel 11 See more »
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Technical Specs

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Color:

Color
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User Reviews

Pretty well done; it's an eye-opener for the structures around you
29 May 2013 | by Mr-FusionSee all my reviews

Surprisingly informative and entertaining TV special that highlights those landmark pieces of architecture that influenced scores of other works in this country.

The 10 buildings featured:

1. Virginia State Capitol

2. Trinity Church, Boston, PA

3. Wainwright building, St. Louis, MO (thus launching the name of Frank Lloyd Wright)

4. The Robie House, Chicago, IL

5. Highland Park Ford Plant, HighlandPark, MI

6. Southdale Center, Edina, MN

7. Seagram Building, New York City

8. Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, VA

9. Vanna Venturi House, Philadelphia, PA 10. Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles

Unless you're a historian, you can't walk away from this without learning something. It covers why government buildings often look like Greek and Roman temples (thanks to Thomas Jefferson); Frank Lloyd Wright's urbanizing of the prairie house, which would set off the suburban ranch style explosion (not to mention the genius of rooms opening into each other without walls); the socialist(!) leanings that invented the shopping mall; the playful cheek of Robert Venturi; the splashy eye-grabbing swirls of Frank Gehry.

When you get past the cutesy cutscene animations (there are only a few), it's a breath of fresh air how this quick piece can make art history and architecture fascinating.

7.5/10


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