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Heavy Water: A Film for Chernobyl (2007)

Not Rated | | Documentary | 7 January 2007 (UK)
On April 26th, 1986, reactor four at Chernobyl nuclear power station explodes, sending an enormous radioactive cloud over Northern Ukraine and neighbouring Belarus. The danger is kept a ... See full summary »

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David Bickerstaff ... Himself
Phil Grabsky ... Himself
Mario Petruccie ... Himself
Francine Brody ... Herself
... Herself
... Himself
... Himself
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On April 26th, 1986, reactor four at Chernobyl nuclear power station explodes, sending an enormous radioactive cloud over Northern Ukraine and neighbouring Belarus. The danger is kept a secret from the rest of the world and the nearby population who go about their business as usual. May Day celebrations begin, children play and the residents of Pripyat marvel at the spectacular fire raging at the reactor. After three days, an area the size of England becomes contaminated with radioactive dust, creating a 'zone' of poisoned land. Based on Mario Petrucci's award-winning book-length poem (split over two books), 'Heavy Water: a film for Chernobyl', and the shorter version 'Half Life: a Journey to Chernobyl", tells the story of the people who dealt with the disaster at ground-level: the fire-fighters, soldiers, 'liquidators', and their families. Written by AtomicTv

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Documentary

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Not Rated
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7 January 2007 (UK)  »

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Interesting
17 October 2016 | by See all my reviews

Heavy Water: A Film for Chernobyl is based on the book of the same name which in turn is poetry based on eye witness accounts of the disaster.

The film has some interesting images, if not all of them from Pripyat, the official line is that there is no or little video surviving of Pripyat before the disaster, even pre-explosion still photography is in short supply. So the film intermingles newer Soviet footage, with images of abandoned Pripyat, poetry and some small facts.

If you are after a documentary on Chernobyl then you will be highly disappointed and if you are not into poetry then Heavy Water is going to be heavy going. As someone who has been to Chernobyl the experience is a very personal one that differs to every person and really Heavy Water is a personal reflection on the worst nuclear disaster in the world. So it may not mean a lot to you.


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