7.3/10
16,727
75 user 269 critic

Phoenix (2014)

Trailer
2:05 | Trailer
A disfigured Holocaust survivor sets out to determine if the man she loved betrayed her trust.

Director:

Christian Petzold

Writers:

Christian Petzold (screenplay), Hubert Monteilhet (novel) | 1 more credit »
17 wins & 30 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Nina Hoss ... Nelly Lenz
Ronald Zehrfeld ... Johnny Lenz
Nina Kunzendorf Nina Kunzendorf ... Lene Winter
Trystan Pütter ... Soldat an der Brücke
Michael Maertens ... Arzt
Imogen Kogge Imogen Kogge ... Elisabeth
Felix Römer Felix Römer ... Geiger
Uwe Preuss ... Clubbesitzer
Valerie Koch ... Tänzerin
Eva Bay ... Tänzerin
Jeff Burrell ... Soldat im Club
Nikola Kastner Nikola Kastner ... Junge Frau
Max Hopp Max Hopp ... Der Mann
Megan Gay ... Mitarbeiterin Zentralstelle Halensee
Kirsten Block ... Wirtin
Edit

Storyline

In the aftermath of WWII, Nelly, a Jewish survivor of the Auschwitz concentration camp, horribly disfigured from a bullet wound in her face, undergoes a series of facial reconstruction surgeries and decides to find her husband Johnny who works at the Phoenix club in Berlin. Undoubtedly, Nelly is stunning, yet, her new self is beyond recognition, so Johnny, the man who may have betrayed her to the Nazis, will never imagine that the woman in front of him who bears an uncomfortable and unsettling resemblance to his late wife, is indeed her. Without delay, and with the intention to collect the deceased's inheritance, Nelly will go along with Johnny's plot and she will impersonate the dead woman, giving the performance of a lifetime before friends and relatives in a complex game of deceit, duplicity, and ultimately, seduction. In the end, during this masquerade, as the fragile and broken Nelly tries to find out whether Johnny betrayed her or not, she will have to dig deep into her wounded ... Written by Nick Riganas

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A Post-war Masterwork by way of VERTIGO. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some thematic elements and brief suggestive material | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

German visa # 146663 delivered on 22-8-2014. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Lene Winter: [arriving at the border]
Soldat an der Brücke: Passport... Nice car. Where did you get it from?
Lene Winter: It's from Switzerland.
Soldat an der Brücke: Just like you?
Lene Winter: Like me.
Soldat an der Brücke: [whistles to the gate] They're from Switzerland. The girl too.
[to her passenger]
Soldat an der Brücke: I want to see your face.
Lene Winter: Can I talk to you?
[...]
See more »

Connections

Version of Return from the Ashes (1965) See more »

Soundtracks

Largo D-moll Op. 3 Nr. 11
Written by Antonio Vivaldi
Conducted by Hector Berlioz
See more »

User Reviews

Simply a superior film.
24 September 2015 | by jdesandoSee all my reviews

"Tomorrow is here, tomorrow is near and always too soon." Kurt Weill

Even if you're a disfigured Holocaust survivor like Nelly (Nina Hoss), tomorrow's march of time will bring its own survival scenario. Her new face gives her problems with her husband, Johnny (Ronald Zehrfeld), as he recruits her to impersonate his wife in order to get his wife's inheritance. As in Hitchcock's Vertigo, the lead female undergoes transformation dealing with the man in her life while sustaining the mistaken identity motif.

Even that plot feels Hitchcockean. No question it's a classic suspend-your-disbelief situation, and it has the almost dreamy quality of Boy in the Striped Pajama. Both works take an isolated, unbelievable scenario related to the Holocaust that nevertheless illuminates the numbing, existential anguish of that horror.

While Nelly searches for Johnny, she is also discovering strength in herself that is part survival and part recognition that the corruption of Auschwitz is not the only corruption in the world. The depiction of that dark postwar world has German expressionism written all over it with the black and white contrasts, lonely European streets and even the corruption and irony of the cabaret.

Nina Hoss's performance, part stunned and part determined, deserves award-season recognition. Her uncertain gait and disfigured face suggest the disorientation the war has brought.

Director Christian Petzold deserves credit for the stunning noirish look that also reflects a real-world, anytime struggle humans have with the combat between appearance and reality and the realization that we cannot know each other completely. As the title suggests and the name of the night club reflects, regeneration is possible but may be as elusive as the mythical bird.

"No movie has ever been able to provide a catharsis for the Holocaust, and I suspect none will ever be able to provide one for 9/11. Such subjects overwhelm art." Roger Ebert


4 of 6 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 75 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Official site | Official site [Japan] | See more »

Country:

Germany | Poland

Language:

German | English

Release Date:

25 September 2014 (Germany) See more »

Also Known As:

Phoenix See more »

Edit

Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$30,296, 26 July 2015

Gross USA:

$3,184,472

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$5,793,245
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed