Life After Beth (2014) - News Poster

News

Justin Theroux Spotted with Aubrey Plaza in N.Y.C. After Split from Jennifer Aniston — See the Photo

Justin Theroux Spotted with Aubrey Plaza in N.Y.C. After Split from Jennifer Aniston — See the Photo
Justin Theroux is spending time with his old Parks and Recreation costar Aubrey Plaza.

The duo, who appeared together in four episodes of the NBC comedy series in 2010, were photographed strolling in New York City and stopping by the actor’s apartment.

“They met to discuss a potential film project,” a source tells People.

The Tropic Thunder writer, 46, guest starred on Parks and Recreation as Justin Anderson, the love interest of Leslie Knope, played by Amy Poehler. Plaza appeared in all seven seasons of the popular sitcom as fan-favorite April Ludgate. Both are also accomplished comedy writers.

Theroux has been
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Movie Review – The Little Hours (2017)

The Little Hours, 2017.

Written and Directed by Jeff Baena

Starring Alison Brie, Dave Franco, Kate Micucci, Aubrey Plaza, John C. Reilly, Molly Shannon, Fred Armisen, Jemima Kirke, Adam Pally, Paul Weitz, Jon Gabrus, Lauren Weedman, Paul Reiser, and Nick Offerman

Synopsis:

A young servant fleeing from his master takes refuge at a convent full of emotionally unstable nuns in the Middle Ages.

For his third feature, writer/director Jeff Baena (Life After Beth, Joshy) has concocted a type of comedy largely missing from the genre’s modern-day state, which is essentially plopping current day lexicons, attitudes, and personalities into a historical setting, specifically here an Italian convent (the movie was actually filmed on-location in Tuscany) somewhere during the 1300s. Not only does such a premise offer up a number of humorous scenarios regardless of variables such as who and where, it allows any feature that chooses this route to present
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Eiff: The Little Hours is Both Cute and Filthy [Review]

Writer-director Jeff Baena (Life After Beth) reunites with Aubrey Plaza, John C. Reilly and Molly Shannon for a raunchy comedy set in a medieval convent and based (very loosely) on a chapter of "The Decameron." The Little Hours follows the misadventures of a young servant, Massetto, played by Dave Franco, whose ill-advised affair with the wife of his master sends him running to the local convent for sanctuary, unaware that he's falling right into the hands of a group of terribly sinful and extremely horny nuns.

Reilly plays Father Tommasso - ostensibly in charge of the convent, his love of the communion wine somewhat undermines his authority, allowing the nuns free-reign to revel, cavort, experiment with witchcraft, "special herbs," and, indeed, with each other. Massetto [Continued ...]
See full article at QuietEarth »

Aubrey Plaza and Director Jeff Baena Reveal the Highs and Lows of Dating Your Creative Collaborator

Aubrey Plaza and Director Jeff Baena Reveal the Highs and Lows of Dating Your Creative Collaborator
In “The Little Hours,” Aubrey Plaza plays a foul-mouthed nun in 14th century Italy, the kind of sarcastic humor Plaza does best. Unsurprisingly, the actress had more than one hand in the production: It’s her first movie as a producer, and director Jeff Baena is her boyfriend.

The film, which also stars John C. Reilly, Dave Franco, Molly Shannon, and a host of other comedic actors, is a loose adaptation of “The Decameron,” the 1353 short story collection by Giovanni Boccaccio. However, “The Little Hours” is also notable for Plaza because it marks her first producing credit. The actress best known for her recurring role in “Parks and Recreation” already has a few more of those in the bag, including the upcoming “Ingrid Goes West,” which opens in August. Plaza’s work on “The Little Hours,” however, provides a window into the collaborative process of an indie power couple who
See full article at Indiewire »

Sound Design Tutorial: The 5 Five Steps of Audio Post Production:

Sundance-winning film sound mixer reveals the power of dialog editing, sound design, and audio mixing. https://youtu.be/Jb2RRoEt4_M The 5 Five Steps of Audio Post Production: 2:20 Sound Editing 3:05 Spotting Session 3:37 Dialog Editing 7:03 Sound Design 11:08 Sound Mixing Ugo Derouard is a Sound Designer & Supervising Sound Editor and has been successfully working in Hollywood since 2006. Over his career, Ugo has worked with A-List Directors and Music Composers, on Award-winning Films, TV Shows, Commercials and Documentaries since 2002. Ugo’s work as a Supervising Sound Editor and Sound Designer has been featured many times at the Sundance Film Festival. In 2012 for the film "The End of Love" featuring Mark Webber & Michael Cera, again in the 2014 “Life After Beth” with Aubrey Plaza as well as the 2015...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Aubrey Plaza On ‘Little Hours,’ ‘Ingrid Goes West’ And ‘Legion’: “I Never Think Anything I Do Is Good” [Podcast]

To say Aubrey Plaza is in the middle of a breakout year is something of an understatement. Sure, she’s had career highlights such as “Parks and Recreation,” “Life After Beth” and “Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates,” but nothing has allowed her to stretch her impressive creative talents as a prestige television series, and the two dark comedies she has hitting theaters this summer.

First off, Noah Hawley’s “Legion” is in serious danger of being ignored by Emmy voters in a sea of impressive Peak TV programming and if it happens it might even be a worse sin than “The Leftovers” being snubbed for its first two seasons.

Continue reading Aubrey Plaza On ‘Little Hours,’ ‘Ingrid Goes West’ And ‘Legion’: “I Never Think Anything I Do Is Good” [Podcast] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Silicon Valley’s’ Thomas Middleditch Cast in ‘Godzilla: King of the Monsters’

‘Silicon Valley’s’ Thomas Middleditch Cast in ‘Godzilla: King of the Monsters’
Silicon Valley” star Thomas Middleditch has been cast in Legendary Entertainment’s “Godzilla: King of the Monsters,” Variety reports. The film will hit theaters on March 22, 2019. Middleditch will star alongside Millie Bobby Brown, Kyle Chandler, Vera Farmiga and O’Shea Jackson Jr.

Read More: ‘Silicon Valley’: Thomas Middleditch Breaks Down Richard’s Big Gamble in the Season 4 Premiere

Godzilla: King of the Monsters” will be directed by “Krampus” director Michael Dougherty, who co-wrote the script with Zach Shields. The film follows 2014’s “Godzilla,” which took in roughly $530 million at the worldwide box office, and will hit theaters more than a year before “Godzilla vs. Kong,” which just attached director Adam Wingard and will debut on May 29, 2020.

Middleditch voices the role of Harold in Dreamworks Animation’s upcoming “Captain Underpants: The First Epic Movie,” which hits theaters on Friday. He will also appear in the Bruce Willis action-comedy “Once Upon
See full article at Indiewire »

New Trailer for The Nunsploitation Comedy The Little Hours with Aubrey Plaza and Alison Brie

A new trailer has been released for the upcoming nunsploitation comedy The Little Hours. I had a chance to watch this movie at Sundance and it was definitely one of the stranger and more awkward films that I saw there. It wasn't really my thing, but I think there's an audience out there who will enjoy it and find it funny.

The story was is set in medieval times and follows three nuns named Alessandra (Alison Brie), Fernanda (Aubrey Plaza), and Ginevra (Kate Micucci), who lead a simple yet complicated life in their convent. "Their days are spent chafing at monastic routine, spying on one another, and berating the estate’s day laborer. After a particularly vicious insult session drives the peasant away, Father Tommasso (John C. Reilly) brings on new hired hand Massetto (Dave Franco), a virile young servant forced into hiding by his angry lord. Introduced to the
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Trailer Watch: Alison Brie and Aubrey Plaza are Raunchy Nuns in “The Little Hours”

The Little Hours

Nuns are usually depicted as stern, stoic, and cloistered away from the debauchery of the wider world. A Nsfw trailer has landed for “The Little Hours,” and never before have we seen the likes of the (un)holy ladies at the center of the comedy. A passerby greets the Sisters by commenting on the beautiful weather, and his innocuous, pleasant remark is not received well. “Hey! Don’t fucking talk to us,” they chide him, calling him a “fucking creep.”

“Medieval nuns Alessandra (Alison Brie), Fernanda (Aubrey Plaza), and Ginevra (Kate Micucci) lead a simple life in their convent. Their days are spent chafing at monastic routine, spying on one another, and berating the estate’s day laborer,” the film’s official synopsis details. “After a particularly vicious insult session drives the peasant away, Father Tommasso (John C. Reilly) brings on new hired hand Massetto (Dave Franco), a virile young servant forced into hiding by his angry lord. Introduced to the sisters as a deaf-mute to discourage temptation, Massetto struggles to maintain his cover as the repressed nunnery erupts in a whirlwind of pansexual horniness, substance abuse, and wicked revelry.”

According to a priest who tallies the Sisters’ sins, their offenses include filthy conversation, lustfulness, homosexuality, and eating blood. But it’s not all fun and games for the nuns at the convent. Alessandra complains of being “stuck here with all of these bitches.”

The Little Hours” received strong reviews at Sundance, where it made its world premiere in January. The film’s cast includes Molly Shannon and “Girls’” Jemima Kirke.

Written and directed by Jeff Baena (“Life After Beth”), “The Little Hours” hits theaters June 30.

https://medium.com/media/c657877e5725e54757b8c3ff4a1aa055/href

Trailer Watch: Alison Brie and Aubrey Plaza are Raunchy Nuns in “The Little Hours” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Little Hours Red Band Trailer Has Nuns Behaving Very Badly

Little Hours Red Band Trailer Has Nuns Behaving Very Badly
New distribution company Gunpowder & Sky has released the first trailer for their outrageous comedy The Little Hours, which was acquired shortly after the R-rated comedy's premiere at the Sundance Film Festival in January. Aubrey Plaza, Alison Brie and Kate Micucci lead a cast chocked full of comedy all-stars, starring as a group of nuns who aren't exactly pleased with their life in the convent. This indie comedy could very well be one of this summer's sleeper hits when it debuts in theaters this coming June.

Medieval nuns Alessandra (Alison Brie), Fernanda (Aubrey Plaza), and Ginevra (Kate Micucci) lead a simple life in their convent. Their days are spent chafing at monastic routine, spying on one another, and berating the estate's day laborer. After a particularly vicious insult session drives the peasant away, Father Tommasso (John C. Reilly) brings on new hired hand Massetto (Dave Franco), a virile young servant forced
See full article at MovieWeb »

Alison Brie & Aubrey Plaza Play Bawdy Medieval Nuns In The Raunchy, Nsfw Trailer For ‘The Little Hours’ [Watch]

You may not quite know the name Jeff Baena, but you kind of do already. Baena helped co-write “I Heart Huckabees” with David O. Russell and if you were paying attention, you’ll also know he directed his feature-length indie with “Life After Beth” in 2013 — a hilarious rom-zomcom starring Aubrey Plaza as the zombie girlfriend from hell. He’s also been working at a ridiculously fast clip.

Continue reading Alison Brie & Aubrey Plaza Play Bawdy Medieval Nuns In The Raunchy, Nsfw Trailer For ‘The Little Hours’ [Watch] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Sundance: 'The Little Hours' heads to Gunpowder & Sky

  • ScreenDaily
Sundance: 'The Little Hours' heads to Gunpowder & Sky
The company that recently acquired FilmBuff has picked up North America and select territories on Jeff Baena’s latest drama.

Baena’s follow-up to Sundance 2016 selection Joshy and Sundance 2014 entry Life After Beth stars Alison Brie, Aubrey Plaza and Kate Micucci as Italian nuns having a hard time keeping their vow of celibacy.

The cast includes Dave Franco, John C Reilly, Molly Shannon, Fred Armisen, Jemima Kirke, Lauren Weedman, Paul Reiser, Adam Pally, Paul Weitz, Jon Gabrus and Nick Offerman.

Liz Destro of Destro Films produced The Little Hours with Plaza. Starstream Media, Bow and Arrow Entertainment, Foton Pictures, Concourse Media and Exhibit served as executive producers.

Jake Hanly and Janet Brown negotiated on behalf of Gunpowder & Sky with Wme Global and CAA for the filmmakers.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Alison Brie, Aubrey Plaza Naughty Nun Movie ‘The Little Hours’ Picked Up by Gunpowder & Sky

  • The Wrap
Alison Brie, Aubrey Plaza Naughty Nun Movie ‘The Little Hours’ Picked Up by Gunpowder & Sky
Gunpowder & Sky has acquired the Alison Brie and Aubrey Plaza naughty-nun movie “The Little Hours” following its premiere in the midnight section of the Sundance Film Festival, TheWrap has learned. Van Toffler’s digital-first studio paid low-seven figures for writer-director Jeff Baena’s new movie, which reunites him with his “Life After Beth” star Aubrey Plaza. Plaza, Brie and Kate Micucci play medieval nuns who chafe at convent routine, spy on one another and berate a day laborer until Father Tommasso (John C. Reilly) brings on new hired hand Massetto (Dave Franco), a virile young servant forced into hiding by his angry.
See full article at The Wrap »

Gunpowder & Sky Acquires Sundance Pic ‘The Little Hours’

Gunpowder & Sky Acquires Sundance Pic ‘The Little Hours’
Exclusive: The Sundance Film Festival deals keep coming. Gunpowder & Sky has made one for low-seven figures for The Little Hours. Written and directed by Life After Beth helmer Jeff Baena, the film revolves around a young servant fleeing from his master who takes refuge at a dysfunctional convent in medieval Tuscany. Alison Brie, Dave Franco, Kate Micucci, Aubrey Plaza, John C. Reilly and Molly Shannon star. Elizabeth Destro and Plaza produced the film that is part of the…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Sundance 2017: Climate Change and Cussing Nuns Kick of 33rd Film Festival

As in the past few years, the 2017 Sundance Film Festival kicked off with a sampling of six movies from the different sections, but the movie that probably had the most interest right off the bat was the premiere of An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power.

Ten years after Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth was blowing minds about global warming from its 2006 Sundance premiere to winning the Oscar, he’s back with an update that offers at least some hope for the future of the earth, but tempered with a warning that the United States could end up backtracking under the leadership of a vocal denier of climate change.

The previous movie was essentially Gore’s slide show presentation of graphs and charts showing how the build-up of carbon gases in the atmosphere has created unstable climate and weather, being responsible for the increase in the deadliest typhoons and hurricanes. At first,
See full article at LRM Online »

Sundance Review: Nuns Go Wild in Medieval Comedy The Little Hours

The Sundance Film Festival has arrived! One of the things I enjoy most about this event is that I have no idea what to expect from most of the movies that I see. It's like playing a deadly game of cinematic Russian roulette. You pull the trigger on seeing a film you know nothing about hoping it doesn't blow your brains out.

The first film I saw at the festival was a medieval comedy called The Littlest Hours, and it didn't necessarily blow my brains out, but it was certainly a misfire that left me dazed and confused. This was an absolutely ridiculous movie. I had no idea what the hell was going on in this film or what the point of it even was.

The story was is set in medieval times and follows three nuns named Alessandra (Alison Brie), Fernanda (Aubrey Plaza), and Ginevra (Kate Micucci), who lead
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Aubrey Plaza Leads a Hilarious Cast of Sexually Deviant Nuns In Jeff Baena’s ‘The Little Hours’ — Sundance 2017 Review

Aubrey Plaza Leads a Hilarious Cast of Sexually Deviant Nuns In Jeff Baena’s ‘The Little Hours’ — Sundance 2017 Review
You know you’re in for a good time when a trio of nuns turn to the genial farmer who greets them one morning with the retort, “Don’t fucking talk to us!” That’s the underlying charm of “The Little Hours,” in which every joke stems from people talking the last way you’d expect of them. Matching a crackling wit with the absurd dissonance of time and place found in the best of Monty Python and Mel Brooks, “Little Hours” is so eager to please that its one-note humor lands with ease.

Writer-director Jeff Baena’s improv-laden twist on “The Decameron,” in which wily 13th-century nuns speak in raunchy contemporary dialogue and engage in sexual deviance, milks its premise for as many jokes as possible and then keeps going, with uneven but mostly hilarious results. Overall, it’s a perfectly satisfying snapshot of subversive comedy that delivers where it counts.
See full article at Indiewire »

Sundance Film Review: ‘The Little Hours’

Sundance Film Review: ‘The Little Hours’
What for American satirist Jeff Baena (“Life After Beth,” “Joshy”) must have felt like a radically innovative idea — take a medieval piece of literature, such as Giovanni Boccaccio’s “The Decameron,” and recreate it with an irreverent modern sensibility — is in fact a strategy that Euro auteurs have been doing for decades. Not that a somewhat overinflated sense of novelty makes Baena’s twisted nuns-gone-wild comedy “The Little Hours” any less entertaining.

Only the most ascetic of filmmakers sets out to create a starchy period piece about naïve maidens pining away in airless old castles. The trouble is that even when such racy directors as Benoit Jacquot and Catherine Breillat attempt to modernize such material, between the subtitles and cultural differences, too much is lost in translation. “The Little Hours” is, then, a medieval convent comedy for the megaplex crowd, one that dispenses with the notion of nuns as prim-and-proper
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Sundance Review: ‘The Little Hours’ Gets by on the Comedic Charms of Its Cast

Take a portion of The Devils, add a splash of The Witch, a heaping of Monty Python, and then douse it in the comedy of today and you have The Little Hours. Set in a 1347 medieval Italy, Jeff Baena’s follow-up to Joshy packs an even bigger cast — including Alison Brie, Dave Franco, Kate Micucci, Aubrey Plaza, John C. Reilly, Molly Shannon, Nick Offerman, Fred Armisen, Jemima Kirke, Adam Pally, and Paul Reiser — and marks a step forward in his directorial style, even if the comedy ends up running out of steam. As our trio of nuns over-indulge in sacramental wine and take part in God-forbidden sexual desires, the cast exudes a lovable charm, despite the nagging sense they had more amusement making it then the audience has watching it.

Based on an amalgamation of short stories in Giovanni Boccaccio’s The Decameron, The Little Hours may base its structural
See full article at The Film Stage »

Sundance Past & Present: Seven Hair-Raising Lessons from Returning Filmmakers

Sundance Past & Present: Seven Hair-Raising Lessons from Returning Filmmakers
Filmmakers around the world harbor the same fantasy: I’m going to make a film so good that it will play the Sundance Film Festival, score rave reviews, sell in an overnight bidding war for a multi-million-dollar minimum guarantee to a major theatrical buyer, open in packed theaters around the country, and launch my career.

Right.

Truth is, this hardly ever happens. We checked in with a group of lauded Sundance filmmakers, all who are returning to the festival this year with new films, to glean what they learned the hard way from their Sundance experiences.

1. Manage expectations.

Alex Ross Perry (“Golden Exits”): My first time was with “Listen Up Philip” [2014], which was a huge step forward from my last movie, “The Color Wheel,” which I made for $25,000 with all my friends. This was a sizable, produced movie with a cast of well-known people [Jason Schwartzman, Elizabeth Moss, Jonathan Pryce]. The first days was all
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites