7.1/10
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68 user 50 critic

5 to 7 (2014)

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2:26 | Trailer

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An aspiring novelist enters into a relationship with a woman, though there's just one catch: She's married and the couple can only meet between the hours of 5 and 7 each evening.

Director:

Victor Levin

Writer:

Victor Levin
1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Anton Yelchin ... Brian Bloom
Bérénice Marlohe ... Arielle Pierpont
David Shannon David Shannon ... Jim the Doorman
Lambert Wilson ... Valéry Pierpont
Amina Robinson ... Governess
Milo Mungier Jacob Milo Mungier Jacob ... Marc Pierpont
Brune de Drueille Senecterre Brune de Drueille Senecterre ... Elodie Pierpont
Alan Gilbert Alan Gilbert ... Himself
Julian Bond Julian Bond ... Himself
Daniel Boulud ... Himself
Olivia Thirlby ... Jane Hastings
Pamela Sue Horowitz Pamela Sue Horowitz ... Herself
Kajsa William-Ollson Kajsa William-Ollson ... Herself
Glenn Close ... Arlene Bloom
Joseph D'Onofrio ... Waiter (as Joe D'Onofrio)
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Storyline

In New York, an aspiring novelist has a cinq-a-sept affair with the beautiful wife of a French diplomat. Cultures, world views, personal ethics and dietary preferences clash as love deepens, with remarkable results. Romance, drama and comedy.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some sexual material | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Facebook

Country:

USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

12 February 2015 (Ukraine) See more »

Also Known As:

Amantes de 5 a 7 See more »

Filming Locations:

New York City, New York, USA

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$18,006, 5 April 2015, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$116,400, 26 April 2015
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Olivia and Anton shared the screen previously in 'New York I Love You'. See more »

Goofs

Brian decided after 3 weeks, on April 21, that he had to see her again. That means it was March when he met her. Neither was dressed appropriately She walked with Brian while wearing a sun dress after the museum. Trees were all in bloom. The weather in NY in late March is often FREEZING but OK let's assume it was warm. But the trees could not be in full bloom. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Brian: Some of the best writing in New York won't be found in books, or movies, or plays, but on the benches of Central Park. Read the benches, and you understand.
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Connections

Features Jules and Jim (1962) See more »

Soundtracks

Whiskey And Rye
Written & Performed by Ian Honeyman
Courtesy of Cutting Edge Music (Holdings) Ltd.
By arrangement with 4AM Music Limited
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User Reviews

 
Til then then
2 April 2015 | by ferguson-6See all my reviews

Greetings again from the darkness. Somewhere along the line, the magic of movie romance has been lost. Love stories these days tend to take either the direction of snark or sap (or whips). Ever so popular in the 1940's and 50's, well-written sentimentality for the big screen would best be described these days as passé'. And that's what makes writer/director Victor Levin's little film such a pleasure to experience.

We begin with a narrator proclaiming that some of the best writing is found on the tribute plaques attached to the benches within Central Park. Those plaques are used a few times throughout the film to drive home a particular situation or status within the story. The narrator is Brian (Anton Yelchin, Star Trek), a 24 year old struggling writer whose parents want him to give up his writing dream and head to law school.

One day, while walking through the city, Brian catches a glimpse of striking woman smoking a cigarette. He crosses the street and the two exchange some clever banter. Just like that … the story begins and their lives are forever changed.

The woman is Arielle (Berenice Marlohe, Skyfall), and she is French, older than Brian, and married … 3 things that are equally problematic according to his dad (Frank Langella), though his mom (Glenn Close) is just thrilled someone likes her boy. As the flirting escalates, Arielle proceeds to explain to Brian that she is open to seeing him daily between the hours of 5:00 pm and 7:00 pm. Familiar with French language, but unfamiliar with customs, Brian is brought up to speed on "cinq a sept" affairs – a tradition in France, where a married person's whereabouts are not questioned during the period after work and before home.

As you might guess, the affair does wonders for Brian as he is finally experiencing the world … passion … connection. Arielle opens his eyes and mind to many things, and Brian is especially taken aback as the lines blur between family and outsiders. This leads him to meet Jane (Olivia Thirlby), who is not just a rising young editor, but also the mistress to Arielle's husband Valery (Lambert Wilson). Yes, it's a tangled web that's woven.

Mr. Levin's script is remarkable in its effectiveness at providing the awkward situations with a dose of humor; and his targets include Jews, the French, and Americans and their customs. It's impossible not to think of the classic film The Graduate, or even Linklater's "Before" franchise, but this one is different … it does not shy away from sentimentality, romance or emotion. The film wears its heart on its sleeve – or more aptly, the screen. We feel (good and bad) right along with the characters.

The camera only uses close-ups when it must, and instead allows the scene and the characters to breathe. There is a simple looking, but wonderful shot of Brian and Arielle walking through Central Park directly towards the camera. They are in discovery mode towards each other, and it's fascinating to listen and watch.

Anyone who fancies themselves a writer will tip their cap to no less than eight lines that are near perfection. Being "too happy to write" is certainly a relatable emotion, but few films feature better last lines than this one … if only we could each be that one reader to which the line refers. If you are open to some heartfelt sentimental romance, then give this one a watch. If not, you'll certainly find no shortage of reviews from caustic critics so quick to rip a film lacking in snark and sarcasm.


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