6.6/10
5,552
58 user 75 critic

Sunshine on Leith (2013)

Trailer
1:59 | Trailer
Two soldiers return home to Edinburgh to resume their romantic and family lives.

Director:

Dexter Fletcher

Writers:

Stephen Greenhorn, Stephen Greenhorn (stage play)
1 win & 10 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Paul Brannigan ... Ronnie
George MacKay ... Davy
Kevin Guthrie ... Ally
Jane Horrocks ... Jean
Peter Mullan ... Rab
Freya Mavor ... Liz
John Spence John Spence ... Brendan
Paul McCole Paul McCole ... Ewan
Emily-Jane Boyle Emily-Jane Boyle ... Christine
Antonia Thomas ... Yvonne
Jason Flemyng ... Harry
Emma Hartley-Miller Emma Hartley-Miller ... Janice
Elaine M. Ellis Elaine M. Ellis ... Morag (as Elaine Mackenzie Ellis)
Gayle Telfer Stevens Gayle Telfer Stevens ... Francine
Sara Vickers ... Eilidh
Edit

Storyline

Sunshine on Leith is based on the sensational stage hit of the same name, featuring music by pop-folk band The Proclaimers. The film follows the stories of Davy and Ally, who have to re-learn how to live life in Edinburgh after coming home from serving in Afghanistan. Both struggle to learn to live a life outside the army and to deal with the everyday struggles of family, jobs and relationships. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

When it happens... there's nothing like it!


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for some suggestive and thematic material, language and brief violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

4 October 2013 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

Aftab bar Faraze Leith See more »

Filming Locations:

Edinburgh, Scotland, UK See more »

Edit

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

£770,239 (United Kingdom), 6 October 2013, Limited Release
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Most of the characters are portrayed as supporters of Hibernian Football Club, the club supported by the Proclaimer Twins, Craig Reid and Charlie Reid, who wrote all of the songs featured. Behind the bar in the "Let's Get Married" scene, a flag proclaims "Scottish Cup Winners 1902". Hibs did win the Scottish Cup in 1902, followed by an 114 year wait until they next won it in 2016. See more »

Goofs

Clothes shopping, Jane Horrocks holds up a black dress on a coat hanger with a name clearly visible on it. She then holds it up to a mirror and it is on a plain black coat hanger. See more »

Crazy Credits

The initial credits show the main characters in short outtakes from the film. The order is Peter Mullan, Jane Horrocks, George Mackay, Antonia Thomas, Freya Mavor, Kevin Guthrie, Jason Flemyng, Paul Brannigan, Sara Vickers, Michael Beat (as Michael 'Cuban' Keat) and John Spence (as 'Wee' John Spence'). This is followed by a listing of the major crew (director, etc,) on a background of the city of Leith in sunshine. Then the credits revert to the traditional scrolling form, starting with the cast listed in order of appearance. See more »

Alternate Versions

The DVD contains the original ending, which was shot indoors, but was replaced at a cost of £500,000 by the ensemble ending shot in Edinburgh. See more »


Soundtracks

Hate My Love
Written by Charlie Reid and Craig Reid
Performed by Jane Horrocks
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Story & music link to make an excellent movie for both men & women
11 October 2013 | by dbayggSee all my reviews

So-called 'budget' movie manages to tick almost all the right boxes. The Proclaimers' music is not always easy, but the cast make a good - sometimes excellent - stab at it. Good acting all round although casting might have been a tad more appropriate.

The storyline hangs together well, and gets better as it develops into 3 distinct strands. There are moments of comedy, high drama, and emotional romance-gone-wrong. It evokes different emotions and I noticed even grown men rubbing their eyes at bits. Surprisingly, not usually the same scenes which seemed to affect women. A touch of Men are from Mars perhaps; or just in touch with their feminine side.

Scenery and scene setting were excellent. The cityscape shots of Edinburgh were truly remarkable, although the director played havoc with Edinburgh's actual street directions. The finale, obviously filmed around Festival time, was great and worth the additional cost.

Go see it, then visit Edinburgh during the festival and 'enjoy' it again.


8 of 11 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 58 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed