7.7/10
444
2 user 3 critic

Benim çocugum (2013)

What happens when your child comes out to you? In this feature documentary, parents of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans-gender individuals in Turkey intimately share their experiences with the... See full summary »

Director:

Writer:

Reviews

Photos

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Sule Ceylan ... Herself
Ömer Ceylan ... Himself
Günseli Dum ... Herself
H. Metehan Ozkan ... Himself
Mehmet Tarhan ... Himself
Sema Yakar ... Herself
Nilgül Yalcinoglu ... Herself
Zeki Yalcinoglu ... Himself
Pinar Özer ... Herself
Edit

Storyline

What happens when your child comes out to you? In this feature documentary, parents of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans-gender individuals in Turkey intimately share their experiences with the viewer, as they redefine what it means to be parents, family, and activists in this conservative, homophobic, and trans-phobic society. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis


Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Official site | Official site

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

7 June 2013 (Turkey)  »

Also Known As:

Dete moje  »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Brave and Forthright Documentary on Alternative Sexualities
7 May 2014 | by See all my reviews

Directed by Can Candan, Ayse Cetinbas and Gokce Ince, BENIM COCUGUM (MY CHILD) is an extremely brave and forthright documentary about alternative sexualities. It begins mundanely enough, with a series of direct-to-camera interviews with middle-aged men and women talking about their experiences of childbirth, rather in the manner of Sarah Polley's STORIES WE TELL (2012). As the narrative unfolds, so these interviewees begin to talk about the ways in which they discovered how their offspring were either gay or transsexual. For people to talk with such frankness in the Turkish context is a wonderful achievement: even in the metropolitan areas of Istanbul, where people seem outwardly very free and liberal in their attitudes, the subject of alternative sexualities is seldom discussed, and when it is, it is often equated with deviance or illness. What renders BENIN COCOGUM such a groundbreaking piece is the ways in which the interviewees disclose how they came to terms with their children's sexualities - so much so, in fact, that they resolved to join a local LGBT organization dedicated to promoting equal rights. The second half of the film shows them attending meetings, talking to psychologists, and planning a demonstration where they call for equal rights - not just before the law, but in the day-to-day exchanges of life. They are shown walking down Istiklal Street, one of Istanbul's iconic streets, in a phalanx, enjoying the pleasures of community while determined to express their point of view. The fact that the interviewees discuss their feelings with such candor, as well as those of their offspring, is a wonderful achievement - especially in the Turkish context, where LGBT people are often assaulted and even killed for daring to express their sexualities. Traditions still run deep within the mainstream of society. Nonetheless BENIM COCUGUM offers hope for the future; if more people are prepared to come out in public, and then contribute to the work of LGBT organizations, both parents and children alike, then perhaps attitudes might change. We can only hope so.


7 of 7 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 2 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Trending TV Series With Prime Video

Explore popular and recently added TV series available to stream now with Prime Video.

Start your free trial