6.7/10
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87 user 286 critic

Clouds of Sils Maria (2014)

Trailer
2:12 | Trailer

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A film star comes face-to-face with an uncomfortable reflection of herself while starring in a revival of the play that launched her career.

Director:

Olivier Assayas

Writer:

Olivier Assayas
19 wins & 42 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Juliette Binoche ... Maria Enders
Kristen Stewart ... Valentine
Chloë Grace Moretz ... Jo-Ann Ellis
Lars Eidinger ... Klaus Diesterweg
Johnny Flynn ... Christopher Giles
Angela Winkler ... Rosa Melchior
Hanns Zischler ... Henryk Wald
Nora von Waldstätten ... Actress in Sci-fi Movie
Brady Corbet ... Piers Roaldson
Aljoscha Stadelmann Aljoscha Stadelmann ... Urs Kobler
Claire Tran ... Maria's London Assistant
Stuart Manashil Stuart Manashil ... Maria's Agent
Peter Farkas Peter Farkas ... Journalist in Zürich
Ben Posener ... Journalist in London
Ricardia Bramley Ricardia Bramley ... Talk Show Host
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Storyline

The first real professional success for famed French actress Maria Enders was twenty years ago as the co-lead in writer Wilhelm Melchoir's play and subsequent movie "Maloja Snake", he who picked Maria, then an unknown, personally. She played Sigrid, an opportunistic eighteen year old in an emotionally dependent lesbian relationship with forty year old Helena, who was at a vulnerable stage of her life. Maria has turned down the play's upcoming London revival in which she would now play Helena, it remounted by director Klaus Diesterweg. Her reasons for turning down the role are many including: being at a vulnerable stage of her own life going through a painful divorce; remembering the suicide of Susan Rosenberg, the original Helena, following the original run of the play, the suicide purportedly mirroring what happens to Helena; and the painful memories of the production in still having hard feelings toward who was her older male costar, Henryk Wald, with who she had an affair at the ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and brief graphic nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

France | Germany | Switzerland

Language:

English | French | German | Swiss German

Release Date:

20 August 2014 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Sils Maria See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$61,810, 12 April 2015, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$1,811,138, 28 June 2015

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$4,733,798, 31 December 2015
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital EX

Color:

Color | Black and White (archive footage)

Aspect Ratio:

2.40 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Bruno Ganz was widely reported to be cast for the role of Henryk Wald, but Ganz was never involved in the project. See more »

Goofs

in part two, during Maria's discussion with her assistant, Juliette Binoche will be seen picking up her glass of wine with the right hand (front shot), then seen using her left hand (shot from the back) See more »

Quotes

Maria Enders: Jo-Ann?
Jo-Ann Ellis: What's up?
Maria Enders: I wanted to ask you. You know the scene at the beginning of Act 3 when you tell me you want to leave and I get on my knees and I beg you to stay? You're on the phone ordering pepperoncini pizza for your coworkers in accounting. You leave without looking at me. As if I didn't exist. If you could pause for a second. Helena's distress would last longer when she's left alone in her office. Well, the way you're playing it, the audience follows you out but instantly forgets about ...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

During the closing credits, four of the actors are shown under the heading "guest appearance by". See more »


Soundtracks

"Paavin of Albarti'
Composed by Innocentio Alberti'
Performed by Hespèrion Xx, Conducted by Jordi Savall
[From the Album Elizabethan Consort Music: 1558-1603]
(p) 1998 Alia Vox
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
One of the most intelligent films of recent years
2 December 2015 | by themadmoviemanSee all my reviews

This is a seriously clever film, with an almost watertight screenplay that keeps you completely engrossed from start to finish and some mesmerising central performances. It is a bit harder to unlock than more mainstream movies, but it provides a hugely satisfying and intriguing discussion when it comes to the end.

Unlike most Hollywood takes on the state of show business and celebrities in the modern world, which is more often than not pretty depressing (take recent films like Birdman and Maps To The Stars), this European film has a much more elegant atmosphere to it whilst it delves into the world of this ageing actress struggling to keep her cool under a lot of pressure.

The film has some absolutely fascinating insights into the world of show business. It looks at jealousy and media pressure on older actresses, whilst also putting across an ironic, satirical poke at the pretentiousness that so many of us have been guilty of with regards to art. There's a lot of talk in this film about reading into films perhaps more than they need to be, but also how more mainstream movies sometimes don't get the deeper recognition they deserve from elitist viewers because of their reputation, which I found absolutely enthralling to watch unfold.

Also, there are some very clever parallels between the relationship between the two main characters, this actress (Juliette Binoche) and her personal assistant (Kristen Stewart), and the characters in the play that they are rehearsing for. It seemed to me that the parallels were pretty deliberate, given that it was almost impossible to tell whether the two were rehearsing or talking to each other for real during the practice scenes, which I thought was a brilliant little touch that really helped to emphasise the confusion and deeper trouble that the characters were facing in the story.

Beyond that, there's so much more to think about in the plot, and I'm sure it requires multiple viewings to fully understand, but it's still a hugely captivating drama first time off anyway, which is absolutely brilliant to see.

Away from the story, the performances here are pretty fantastic too. Juliette Binoche perfectly captures her character's sense of confusion and loss as she goes through this time in her life, whilst also making her a recognisably snooty and diva-ish person that you can understand much clearer. Meanwhile, Kristen Stewart is excellent as the personal assistant, who tries hard to get to her employer, but often ends up feeling frustrated, and makes her character just as interesting, even if she is a side-player in the grand scheme of things.

Another point on the performances is that everyone, not only Binoche and Stewart, deliver their lines so brilliantly. It seems a pretty trivial thing to say, but in this film, I noticed what proper dialogue delivery sounds like so much more than anything else I've seen; every word was so clear and crisp, with fantastic emotion behind it, and that was just wonderfully impressive to witness for me.


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