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A Quiet Passion (2016)

PG-13 | | Biography, Drama | 7 April 2017 (UK)
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The story of American poet Emily Dickinson from her early days as a young schoolgirl to her later years as a reclusive, unrecognized artist.

Director:

Terence Davies

Writer:

Terence Davies
3 wins & 22 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Emma Bell ... Young Emily
Sara Vertongen Sara Vertongen ... Miss Lyon (as Sara Louise Vertongen)
Rose Williams ... Young Vinnie
Benjamin Wainwright ... Young Austin
Keith Carradine ... Father
Marieke Bresseleers Marieke Bresseleers ... Jenny Lind
David Van Bouwel David Van Bouwel ... Concert Hall Pianist
Annette Badland ... Aunt Elizabeth
Steve Dan Mills Steve Dan Mills ... Dr. Holland
Joanna Bacon ... Mother
Daniel Vereenooghe Daniel Vereenooghe ... Carriage Driver
Michel Delanghe Michel Delanghe ... Carriage Driver Assistant
Maurice Cassiers Maurice Cassiers ... Photographer
Duncan Duff ... Austin Dickinson
Jennifer Ehle ... Vinnie Dickinson
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Storyline

The story of American poet Emily Dickinson from her early days as a young schoolgirl to her later years as a reclusive, unrecognized artist.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Biography | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for thematic elements, disturbing images and brief suggestive material | See all certifications »
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Details

Official Sites:

Official site [Japan]

Country:

UK | Belgium | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

7 April 2017 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

Historia de una pasión See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

€6,900,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$45,825, 14 April 2017, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$1,864,266, 7 July 2017
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Terence Davies admitted to Cynthia Nixon before filming that he was not only not a fan of her famous show Sex and the City (1998), he found it "pernicious." He did admit that he watched an episode with the sound off and found her reactions the truest. According to him, Nixon was very civilized about his honesty. See more »

Goofs

Emily's brother refers to the draft and the fee for avoiding it right after Fort Sumter, in 1861. The draft and the fee were not established until 1863, and in 1861 everyone was sure that volunteers would end the war very quickly. See more »

Quotes

Emily Dickinson: If I can't have equality, then I want nothing of love.
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Soundtracks

The Unanswered Question
Written by Charles Ives
Published by Peer International Corporation (BMI)
Performed by the Brussels Philharmonic Orchestra
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User Reviews

 
Neither quiet nor passion
29 October 2016 | by howard.schumannSee all my reviews

The great American poet Emily Dickinson wrote:

"Because I could not stop for Death, He kindly stopped for me; The carriage held but just ourselves And Immortality."

Whether or not Dickinson stopped for life, it kindly stopped for her and her immortality is enshrined in the legacy of the 1800 exquisite poems she left, only ten of which were published during her lifetime. She did not leave any commentaries to interpret her work, but left them for us to understand and explain. One interpretation of her life and work is provided by Terence Davies in his film A Quiet Passion, a sympathetic but overwritten and curiously wooden look at her life and the influences that shaped her art. Starring Cynthia Nixon ("The Adderall Diaries") as Emily, Davies traces Dickinson's life in a standard linear format. Raised in the Puritan New England city of Amherst, Massachusetts (the film is shot near Antwerp, Belgium) the poet was lonely and secretive throughout her life, seldom left home, and visitors were few.

She stayed with her family all of her life, living through births, marriages, and deaths but always setting aside the early morning hours in her study to compose. Bright and outgoing as a young woman, Emily is portrayed as becoming more isolated, and bitter as she grows older. Her only companions were her austere and unforgiving father, Edward (Keith Carradine, "Ain't Them Bodies Saints"), a one-term Congressman, her haughty brother, Austin (Duncan Duff, "Island"), who became an attorney and lived next door with his wife Susan Gilbert (Johdi May, "Ginger and Rosa"), and her younger sister, Lavinia (Jennifer Ehle, "Little Men") who was her greatest solace. As the film opens, Emily is tagged as an outsider almost immediately. As a young student (Emma Bell, "See You in Valhalla") at the Mount Holyoke women's seminary, she stands up to the governess by declaring that she does not want either to be saved by divine Providence or forgotten by it and also speaks out for feminism, women's rights and abolitionism.

Her willingness to challenge conventional thinking by dismissing Longfellow's poem "The Song of Hiawatha" as "gruel," and her support for the poorly-regarded Bronte sisters was not appreciated by her family. "If they wanted to be wholesome," she retorted, "I imagine they would crochet." As Davies cleverly morphs the faces of Emily and her well-to-do family from children into adults, a clearer picture emerges of her relationship with her strict father and reserved mother (Joanna Bacon, "Love Actually"). Her only refuge from family conflicts and disappointments was her intimate relationship with Vinnie, the companionship of her best friend Vryling Buffam (Catherine Bailey, "The Grind"), and the sermons of Reverend Wadsworth (Eric Loren, "Red Lights"). Irreverent and provocative, Emily, Vinnie, and Vryling are shown walking through the gardens, exchanging witty aphorisms while they twirl their parasols, but the element of artifice is overbearing.

We do not see Emily in the process of composition but listen to her poems read aloud in voice-over. They are the highlight of the film, but there are not enough of them and too much time is spent on Emily's sad physical deterioration as she confronts the debilitating Bright's disease. In this regard, there is no subtlety in the film's presentation as the camera unnecessarily lingers over Emily's shaking fits for an inordinate length of time and her last days are an endurance test for the audience. In spite of the family's strong religious approach to life, there is no reflection about her life and legacy or talk about life's meaning and purpose.

Though Emily Dickinson's poetry glimmers with a spiritual glow, the uniqueness of who she is does not fully come across. For all of its fine performances and moments of comic satire, A Quiet Passion is dramatically inert, and its stilted and mannered dialogue is an emotional straitjacket with each character talking to the other as if they were reading a book of aphorisms. Terence Davies has directed some memorable period films in his career such as his remarkable adaptation of Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth. A Quiet Passion, however, has neither quiet nor passion. Gratitude must be offered, however, to Davies for introducing the poems of Emily Dickinson to a wider audience. Thanks Terence and thanks Emily.

"You left me, sweet, two legacies, A legacy of love A Heavenly Father would content, Had He the offer of; You left me boundaries of pain Capacious as the sea, Between eternity and time, Your consciousness and me"


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