6.6/10
3,864
56 user 128 critic

A Quiet Passion (2016)

PG-13 | | Biography, Drama | 7 April 2017 (UK)
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The story of American poet Emily Dickinson from her early days as a young schoolgirl to her later years as a reclusive, unrecognized artist.

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3 wins & 22 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... Young Emily
Sara Vertongen ... Miss Lyon (as Sara Louise Vertongen)
... Young Vinnie
... Young Austin
... Father
Marieke Bresseleers ... Jenny Lind
David Van Bouwel ... Concert Hall Pianist
... Aunt Elizabeth
Steve Dan Mills ... Dr. Holland
... Mother
Daniel Vereenooghe ... Carriage Driver
Michel Delanghe ... Carriage Driver Assistant
Maurice Cassiers ... Photographer
... Austin Dickinson
... Vinnie Dickinson
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Storyline

The story of American poet Emily Dickinson from her early days as a young schoolgirl to her later years as a reclusive, unrecognized artist.

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Genres:

Biography | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for thematic elements, disturbing images and brief suggestive material | See all certifications »
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Details

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Official site [Japan]

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Release Date:

7 April 2017 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Historia de una pasión  »

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Box Office

Budget:

€6,900,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$45,825, 14 April 2017, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$1,864,266, 7 July 2017
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2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Terence Davies read six biographies of Emily Dickinson prior to making the film and he believes that she is a genius. Cynthia Nixon also read a lot of biographies of Emily Dickinson in order to get into the role and she detected contradictions, but she found it interesting because she had the chance to choose her favorite versions. See more »

Goofs

Emily says she writes at 3a.m. until 5 a.m., yet she is sometimes seen writing at her desk in what appears to be broad daylight. Though she writes a lot, no ink stains her fingers or her sleeves. See more »

Quotes

Emily Dickinson: Poems are my solace for the eternity which surrounds us all.
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Soundtracks

Ah! Non Credea Mirarti
[From "La sonnambula"]
Written by Vincenzo Bellini
Performed by Marieke Bresseleers and Luc De Vos (as Luke Devos)
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User Reviews

 
Too quiet, not enough passion
20 April 2017 | by See all my reviews

Emily Dickinson lived her entire life (1830-1886) in Amherst, Massachusetts, rarely leaving the town and, in middle age, not even leaving the family home. She never married and, in this biopic, only once falls seriously in love – with a married vicar who almost certainly did not know of her "quiet passion". A young man who courts her later in the movie has to talk to her unseen at the top of the stairs.

Dickinson's life lacks the stuff that might make a substantial movie. Cynthia Nixon does a valiant job of giving her substance – in conversations and arguments with her sister (Jennifer Ehle), her father (Keith Carradine, looking like a Mount Rushmore effigy) and visitors and relatives – but what little drama there is here comes from illness and death scenes, of which there are many, long drawn out. The overdone manners of the era are parodied in drawing-room scenes borrowed from Jane Austen and Oscar Wilde, scenes that are pleasingly comic but seem more than a little contrived. Nixon reads some of the verse in voice-over but the early efforts, celebrating Nature, are not in Walt Whitman's league and only the later poems anticipating (almost inviting) Death have any real resonance. It is for these that Emily Dickinson is mostly remembered.

The cinematography is splendid, and the costumes and the over- furnished sets convey a stifling sense of the period. A moment in which portraits of the younger Dickinsons morph into their older selves is exquisite and there's another nice one at the end. The script – and the direction – struggle to make a mountain out of the molehill that was Emily's life. I was constantly thinking how much more 'oomph' there is in an Austen or a Brontë adaptation.


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