6.6/10
9,087
45 user 99 critic

Words and Pictures (2013)

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An art instructor and an English teacher form a rivalry that ends up with a competition at their school in which students decide whether words or pictures are more important.

Director:

Fred Schepisi

Writer:

Gerald Di Pego (as Gerald DiPego)
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Clive Owen ... Jack Marcus
Juliette Binoche ... Dina Delsanto
Bruce Davison ... Walt
Navid Negahban ... Rashid
Amy Brenneman ... Elspeth
Valerie Tian ... Emily
Adam DiMarco ... Swint
Josh Ssettuba ... Cole Patterson
Janet Kidder ... Sabine
Christian Scheider Christian Scheider ... Tony
Keegan Connor Tracy ... Ellen
Andrew McIlroy Andrew McIlroy ... Roy Loden
Harrison MacDonald ... Shaftner
Willem Jacobson ... Stanhope
Tanaya Beatty ... Tammy
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Storyline

A flamboyant English teacher (Clive Owen) and a new, stoic art teacher (Juliette Binoche) collide at an upscale prep school. A high-spirited courtship begins and she finds herself enjoying the battle. Another battle they begin has the students trying to prove which is more powerful, the word or the picture. But the true war is against their own demons, as two troubled souls struggle for connection. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Is a man worth more than his words, a woman worth more than her pictures?

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for sexual material including nude sketches, language and some mature thematic material | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA | Canada | Australia

Language:

English

Release Date:

17 July 2014 (Australia) See more »

Also Known As:

Apropó szerelem See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$78,200, 30 May 2014, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$2,166,206, 15 August 2014
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the scene in which Jack Marcus destroys his living room, the music in the background is David Bowie's "The Stars (Are Out Tonight)" from his album The Next Day. Clive Owen insisted on using this on the soundtrack rather than the classical music that director Fred Schepisi preferred. See more »

Quotes

Elspeth: Just be who you were!
Jack Marcus: Nobody can.
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Soundtracks

You Bring The Sun Out
Written by Jessy Dixon & Tom Snow
Performed by Randy Crawford
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User Reviews

 
A mediocre film enlivened by fascinating characters and great performances.
12 June 2014 | by shawneofthedeadSee all my reviews

It's a rare film that manages to be tedious and fascinating at the same time, but that's precisely what happens with the clumsily-named and executed Words And Pictures. The film's central conceit is right there in its title: a battle for supremacy unfolds between an English teacher (words) and his new colleague, who schools students in the fine arts (pictures). It shouldn't work at all, especially when the relationship moves predictably into romantic territory. But it's tough to completely dismiss the film when its awkward screenplay also features two intriguing central characters, played with subtle, almost miraculous depth by Clive Owen and Juliette Binoche.

English teacher Jack Marcus (Owen) is on the brink of academic implosion: his job is on the line, he's barely making it to his classes on time, and he's drinking a little too much for anyone's comfort. But, just as things are looking really bleak, his downward trajectory is briefly interrupted by the arrival of Dina Delsanto (Binoche), a revered artist who's losing her ability to make art as her body is increasingly ravaged by the aches and pains of rheumatoid arthritis. She values imagery and art; he treasures words and literature - their clash fires up their students' imaginations, even as they bicker and spar their way into an evident mutual attraction.

There's no denying that the film rests on an awkward foundation: the script keeps returning to the ridiculous dichotomy it establishes between words and pictures, pitting Marcus against Delsanto in a competition that makes very little sense. It's all tied up with a subplot involving shy arts student Emily (Valerie Tian), whose ability to come out of her shell to be the artist she can be is all wrapped up with issues of sexual harassment and public humiliation. Frankly, it's just not very good.

What is very good about the film is its two central characters, and the spiky, difficult and joyfully equal relationship that springs up between them. There's so much depth, sadness and maturity layered into Marcus and Delsanto that it's absolutely fascinating just to watch them in action, together and apart. Both characters have rough edges that aren't sanded away, and the odd fireworks between them work precisely because both their lives have stalled: Marcus is a charming mess who lost himself somewhere along the way; Delsanto is a brilliant artist who can no longer express herself the way she wants to. Somehow, they wind up inspiring each other to do better and be better - and, instead of feeling horribly mawkish, it works.

That's due in no small part to the excellent work done by the two lead actors. Owen sinks thoroughly into the part of Marcus, dialling up the charm and the horror of his character in equal measure. The film doesn't soften or romanticise Marcus and his problems, which gives Owen plenty of great character stuff to do. Binoche, too, has ample room to uncover the sad, yearning soul of a whip-smart, independent woman whose illness has stolen not just her art but also a little of her dignity.

Ultimately, the fantastic and fascinating interplay between the two actors and characters are pretty much worth the price of admission. They're surrounded by an odd, awkward beast of a movie, built on a very shaky foundation. But their brave, deep performances and bittersweet chemistry come very close to making Words And Pictures worth a lot more than it really is.


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