Aspiring musician Miguel, confronted with his family's ancestral ban on music, enters the Land of the Dead to find his great-great-grandfather, a legendary singer.

Directors:

Lee Unkrich, Adrian Molina (co-director)

Writers:

Lee Unkrich (original story by), Jason Katz (original story by) | 4 more credits »
Popularity
544 ( 190)
Top Rated Movies #75 | Won 2 Oscars. Another 109 wins & 40 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Anthony Gonzalez ... Miguel (voice)
Gael García Bernal ... Héctor (voice)
Benjamin Bratt ... Ernesto de la Cruz (voice)
Alanna Ubach ... Mamá Imelda (voice)
Renee Victor ... Abuelita (voice) (as Renée Victor)
Jaime Camil ... Papá (voice)
Alfonso Arau ... Papá Julio (voice)
Herbert Siguenza ... Tío Oscar / Tío Felipe (voice)
Gabriel Iglesias ... Clerk (voice)
Lombardo Boyar ... Plaza Mariachi / Gustavo (voice)
Ana Ofelia Murguía Ana Ofelia Murguía ... Mamá Coco (voice)
Natalia Cordova-Buckley ... Frida Kahlo (voice)
Selene Luna Selene Luna ... Tía Rosita (voice)
Edward James Olmos ... Chicharrón (voice)
Sofía Espinosa ... Mamá (voice)

Meet New 'Coco' Star Anthony Gonzalez

Get to know the talented young star of Pixar's latest movie about a 12-year-old, music-loving boy who makes an unforgettable journey to the Land of the Dead.

Meet the new Pixar star

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Storyline

Despite his family's baffling generations-old ban on music, Miguel dreams of becoming an accomplished musician like his idol, Ernesto de la Cruz. Desperate to prove his talent, Miguel finds himself in the stunning and colorful Land of the Dead following a mysterious chain of events. Along the way, he meets charming trickster Hector, and together, they set off on an extraordinary journey to unlock the real story behind Miguel's family history. Written by Disney/Pixar

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The celebration of a lifetime


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for thematic elements | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

John Ratzenberger, long considered Pixar's good-luck charm, continues his streak of appearing in every one of the studio's feature films. In Coco (2017), he plays a ghost called Juan Ortodoncia. He is the skeleton who is allowed to cross over to the land of the living because his dentist remembers him. See more »

Goofs

When Miguel's abuelita catches him in the plaza with the Mariachi, Miguel pushes the guitar back. The Mariachi puts his hands up to keep his sombrero on and between shots, the guitar flips over in his lap. In one shot, the neck is on the Mariachi's right hand--the position Miguel, facing opposite, was holding it in--and in the next, the neck is on the Mariachi's left hand, as if the Mariachi was about to play it. See more »

Quotes

Miguel: This isn't a dream, then - you're all really out there.
Tía Victoria: You thought we weren't?
Miguel: Well, I don't know - I thought it might have been one of those made-up things adults tell kids! Like vitamins.
Tía Victoria: Miguel, vitamins are a real thing!
Miguel: Well, now I'm thinking maybe they could be.
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Crazy Credits

After the end credits but before the above-mentioned mosaic comes on it reads: "Dia de Muertos is a Mexican heritage tradition with roots in indigenous culture. To learn more, visit your local library." See more »

Alternate Versions

Also released in 3D version See more »


Soundtracks

La Petenera
Traditional
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User Reviews

 
Heartbreakingly beautiful. Surpasses Up and Inside Out
15 April 2018 | by Charliedog2015See all my reviews

Coco is about Dias de las Muerte (Day of the Dead), family, family crises and musical passion. The posters have a boy and an adult skeleton capering through the afterlife. So you can know that upfront, Pixar is going to fully deal with the subject of death that it touched upon I UP and hinted at in the death of childhood innocence in Inside Out.

We were subtly forewarned that tissues would be needed. :)

It surpasses the other aforementioned masterpieces by being more relatable, drawing on family restrictions and prohibitions (e.g. "there will be no X in this family!" X being "instead whatever has caused pain to a family member in the past". Pick your poison my reader). It surpasses them in making death tolerable. It reminds us that we should be mindful and respectful of all those who went before us. Most of all it taps on the shoulder and whispers that the temporal, the world we live in, in just as important as the next one and we should strive to keep family bonds strong. For when we're at the end of our rope, who else is there to pull us up?

Did I mention bring Kleenex? A full box. Even hard core macho men are driven to quiet sobs and immediate phone calls to mothers and fathers telling them "mama, I miss you."

Beautiful.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA | Mexico

Language:

English | Spanish

Release Date:

22 November 2017 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Untitled Dia de los Muertos Project See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$175,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$50,802,605, 26 November 2017

Gross USA:

$210,460,015

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$807,817,888
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

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