7.4/10
79
3 user

43,000 Feet (2012)

When statistician John Wilkins is sucked out of a plane at 43,000 feet, he calculates that he has exactly 3 minutes and 48 seconds before he hits the ground.

Director:

Campbell Hooper

Writers:

Matt Harris (as Matthew Harris), Matt Harris
Reviews
2 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

Add Image Add an image

Do you have any images for this title?

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Dylan Pharazyn Dylan Pharazyn ... John Wilkins
Edit

Storyline

When statistician John Wilkins is sucked out of a plane at 43,000 feet, he calculates that he has exactly 3 minutes and 48 seconds before he hits the ground.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A short film about falling.

Genres:

Short | Drama

Edit

Details

Country:

New Zealand

Language:

English

Release Date:

April 2012 (USA) See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

NZD 90,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Special Problems See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color
See full technical specs »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Nicely engaging tone and style
12 February 2014 | by bob the mooSee all my reviews

I have seen short film before where really the narration sets the tone and the rest falls in around it perfectly to complete a whole – Bullet in the Brain is one very good example in the later stages and, although 43,000 Feet doesn't compare in terms of quality, it does have the same structure and effect. The story is a man falling to his (probably) death from an airplane while his inner thoughts calmly narrate his plans, his advice to others in the same situation and so on. In terms of content there is not too much of real impact or meaning here but yet it engages throughout and you do pretty much hang on each word, whether it be a story, logic, reasoning or truths. Looking back from the position of a few seconds after it finishes, you may feel like me that it was a stylistic piece rather than a satisfying one but this is not too big a problem.

It does work as style and I enjoyed the animation and the supporting pieces of film in terms of the structure of the film, while the narration from Dylan Pharazyn is very good with its even, careful tone – not a whisper but the sort of deliberate low tone that makes you lean in a little bit to be sure you hear him as he goes. Ultimately it doesn't amount to much and the idea doesn't come to a big impact (well, apart from the one awaiting John Wilkins) but it is nicely engaging as it goes as the visuals, narration and dialogue fit well together to work in this way.


1 of 1 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 3 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Popular Action and Adventure Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular action and adventure titles available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed