An unexpected romance blooms after the the youngest daughter of a merchant who has fallen on hard times offers herself to the mysterious beast to which her father has become indebted.

Director:

Christophe Gans

Writers:

Sandra Vo-Anh (scenario and dialogue), Christophe Gans (scenario and dialogue) | 1 more credit »
1 win & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Vincent Cassel ... La Bête / Le Prince
Léa Seydoux ... Belle
André Dussollier ... Le marchand
Eduardo Noriega ... Perducas
Myriam Charleins ... Astrid
Audrey Lamy ... Anne
Sara Giraudeau ... Clotilde
Jonathan Demurger ... Jean-Baptiste
Nicolas Gob ... Maxime
Louka Meliava ... Tristan
Yvonne Catterfeld ... La Princesse
Dejan Bucin ... Louis
Wolfgang Menardi ... Thierry
Mickey Hardt ... Etienne
Arthur Doppler Arthur Doppler ... Virgil
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Storyline

An unexpected romance blooms after the the youngest daughter of a merchant who has fallen on hard times offers herself to the mysterious beast to which her father has become indebted.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The legend is reborn...


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some fantasy violence, sensuality and partial nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the tale, Belle's father spends the night in the castle to rest and leaves in the morning, whereas he leaves immediately after having dinner in this movie. Furthermore, he begs the Beast for forgiveness after taking the rose and promises to come back in the original story. Here, he defies the Beast, forcing it to threaten his family. See more »

Quotes

[Translated From Trailer]
Belle: Who does this castle belong to?
The Beast: Everything here belongs to me.
Belle: You talk like any other man. It's a little disappointing.
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Crazy Credits

The Eskwad logo turns into a rose. See more »

Connections

Version of Beauty and the Beast (1987) See more »

Soundtracks

Sauras Tu M'Aimer
Written by François Welgryn and Olivier Reine
English adaptation by Jeremy Clancy (as Jeremy Clancy)
Performed by Yoann Fréget (as YOANN FREGET), Olivier Reine (piano) and F.A.M.E.'S. Project (as Macedonian Radio Symphonic Orchestra)
Courtesy of Mercury Music Group, UN Label Universal Music France Éditions Eskwadzik/ Pathé Production
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User Reviews

 
Looks good, but where's the love?
28 January 2016 | by ferguson-6See all my reviews

Greetings again from the darkness. If you are looking for dancing tea cups or singing candelabras, you've come to the wrong movie. If you are looking for the Gothic approach to the dark psychological analysis of the original story … again, you've come to the wrong movie. Director Christophe Gans (Silent Hill, 2006) offers up a version that is neither animated Disney (1991) nor Jean Cocteau (1946), though his film does have a visual flair that will likely keep audiences (it's not for very young kids) engaged throughout.

The familiar story was first written by Gabrielle-Suzanne Barbot de Villenueve in 1740, however, it's the revised version from Jeanne-Marie Leprince de Beaumont in 1756 that provides the fairy tale/fable that has been filmed so many times since. The story's genealogy based in France instills a bit more hope and responsibility in a project starring Vincent Cassel, Lea Seydoux and Andre Dussolier, and directed by the Frenchman Gans.

Ms. Seydoux is an admirable Belle, and her grace and beauty make for quite the contrast to her needy and entitled sisters. Her time in the castle with the Beast is limited, and therein is the film's biggest weakness. We never really see the transformation of the Beast to a man who repents, turns over a new leaf, and is worthy of love … it all just kind of happens thanks to the beautiful dresses. Mr. Gans and Sandra Vo-Anh co-wrote the script, and this misstep deflates the core of the story. We are on our own to interpret the messages of class warfare, greed, and judging others by looks. The focus instead is on the visual presentation, which at times is spectacular.

The set design and costumes are especially impressive and elaborate, and though the look of the Beast may not be precisely to your imagination, the film isn't shy about putting him front and center with the camera. Vincent Cassel's time as the Prince is pretty well done, and the CGI and explanation of the gold doe, nymph of the forest, magic healing water, pack of beagles and the curse are enough to move the story along … even if some details are lacking.

A bedtime story being read to two young kids is the framing device and might explain why the fantasy world is emphasized over the dark psychological undertones (more prevalent in the Cocteau version). While some might view the ending as somewhat mawkish, it's really nice to see happily-ever-after is not twisted into some contemporary take on independence.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

France | Germany | Spain

Language:

French | English

Release Date:

23 September 2016 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Beauty and the Beast See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

EUR33,000,000 (estimated)

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$47,430,624
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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