When the newly crowned Queen Elsa accidentally uses her power to turn things into ice to curse her home in infinite winter, her sister Anna teams up with a mountain man, his playful reindeer, and a snowman to change the weather condition.

Directors:

Chris Buck, Jennifer Lee

Writers:

Jennifer Lee (screenplay by), Hans Christian Andersen (story inspired by: "The Snow Queen" by) | 3 more credits »
Popularity
643 ( 65)
Won 2 Oscars. Another 79 wins & 60 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Kristen Bell ... Anna (voice)
Idina Menzel ... Elsa (voice)
Jonathan Groff ... Kristoff (voice)
Josh Gad ... Olaf (voice)
Santino Fontana ... Hans (voice)
Alan Tudyk ... Duke (voice)
Ciarán Hinds ... Pabbie / Grandpa (voice)
Chris Williams ... Oaken (voice)
Stephen J. Anderson ... Kai (voice)
Maia Wilson Maia Wilson ... Bulda (voice)
Edie McClurg ... Gerda (voice)
Robert Pine ... Bishop (voice)
Maurice LaMarche ... King (voice)
Livvy Stubenrauch ... Young Anna (voice)
Eva Bella ... Young Elsa (voice)
Edit

Storyline

Fearless optimist Anna teams up with rugged mountain man Kristoff and his loyal reindeer Sven and sets off on an epic journey to find her sister Elsa, whose icy powers have trapped the kingdom of Arendelle in eternal winter. Encountering Everest-like conditions, mystical trolls and a hilarious snowman named Olaf, Anna and Kristoff battle the elements in a race to save the kingdom. From the outside Elsa looks poised, regal and reserved, but in reality she lives in fear as she wrestles with a mighty secret: she was born with the power to create ice and snow. It's a beautiful ability, but also extremely dangerous. Haunted by the moment her magic nearly killed her younger sister Anna, Elsa has isolated herself, spending every waking minute trying to suppress her growing powers. Her mounting emotions trigger the magic, accidentally setting off an eternal winter that she can't stop. She fears she's becoming a monster and that no one, not even her sister, can help her. Written by DeAlan Wilson for ComedyE.com

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for some action and mild rude humor | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The third computer animated film of the 21st century to win the Oscar for Best Original Song, the first two being Monsters, Inc. (2001) and Toy Story 3 (2010). See more »

Goofs

Elsa's parents and the trolls knew that the main reason her powers to go out of control were fear. But locking her in her room and keeping her away from people will just add to that. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Young Kristoff: [pulling on the reins of his reindeer in a snowy land] Come on, Sven!
[the scene changes to the castle of Arendelle]
Young Anna: [approaching her big sister, who is sleeping soundly in bed] Elsa, psst! Elsa!
[Anna climbs on the bed and pushes on Elsa]
Young Anna: Wake up! Wake up! Wake up!
Young Elsa: Anna, go back to sleep!
Young Anna: [sighs and rolls around] I just can't! The sky's awake so I'm awake. So we have to play!
Young Elsa: Go play by yourself!
[...]
See more »

Crazy Credits

For the Disney credits, "Caffeination" is one of the job titles. See more »

Alternate Versions

Also released in 3D. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Mortal Kombat 11 (2019) See more »

Soundtracks

Love is an Open Door
Written by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez (uncredited)
Performed by Kristen Bell and Santino Fontana
See more »

User Reviews

 
Great Visuals, Unremarkable Script
9 January 2014 | by brent_orSee all my reviews

First of all, I strongly disagree with any assertions that Frozen hearkens back to the great Disney films of the late 80s and early 90s. The music is nowhere near that level, and the storytelling is not nearly as sharp. Even suggesting that this is the best *since* The Lion King rings false with me. I have not seen every Disney film of the past twenty years, but offhand I can say that Tangled, Bolt and Meet the Robinsons are all far superior examples well-written stories than Frozen. In my personal opinion, of course.

Second of all, Frozen definitely skews towards the younger crowd, with little to none of the sophisticated touches or wittily mature humor that have come to be somewhat more commonplace in recent animated films. This one is aimed at the pre-teen crowd. Not that that is necessarily a bad thing, but it is worth noting.

The overall story is an interesting one, but the execution is rather sloppy and the narrative meanders a bit too much. The dialog, in particular, is not a strength. Unlike the best films, in which every line and every scene feels both essential and perfect, Frozen is more of a loose joyride. Again, there is nothing inherently wrong with that approach, but in my personal estimation, it earns lower marks as a storytelling method.

The songs are for the most part unremarkable, and some of the musical sequences suffer from not fully committing to dialog or singing. They just feel hastily-choreographed and not fully thought out. And do not even get me started on the troll song. Yikes.

Two of the songs, "Do You Want to Build a Snowman" and especially "Let it Go," do work very well. The latter ties into what is unquestionably the best scene in the film on every level. It provides the one glimpse of true majesty, the sort of quality that would explain all of the extremely positive "this is the greatest" reviews that are being posted by others. Unfortunately, the film descends most of the way back into mediocrity after that scene.

On the positive front, however, Frozen offers a fantastic, gorgeous take on the visual elements of winter. Deep blue ice, snowflakes, white mountains contrasting with colored skies. It is an unspeakably lovely display of a subject matter than CGI animation has never (in my experience) turned its energies to before, at least not like this. Of course, it goes without saying that all of the animation in Frozen, characters and landscapes alike, is excellent.

For me, Tangled was much more satisfying than Frozen. I applaud Disney for honing their CGI skills, and for finally adapting The Snow Queen to screen. I just wish that they would have spent more time on the script.

With films like this one, a distinction needs to be made between loving it for the visceral takeaway ("it was sweet"/"it had a great message"/"it made me feel good") and looking at it from a critical standpoint. Now, I understand that one needs to just "forget about being critical" and enjoy a film - for me, the best films take care of that themselves. It is the ones, like Frozen, that seem like they clearly could have been much better, that get me thinking about just that.

This film is a fun one for kids, and great to look at for adults, but it is far short of being great, or a masterpiece. More focus on an truly excellent story, and it might have been.


230 of 395 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 1,178 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA | Norway

Language:

English | Norwegian

Release Date:

27 November 2013 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Snow Queen See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$150,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$243,390, 24 November 2013

Gross USA:

$400,953,009

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$1,282,237,224
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed