Scientists are discovering volcanoes on worlds we once thought dead. From our nearest planetary neighbour to tiny moons billions of miles away, today we are discovering volcanoes on alien ... See full summary »

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Cast

Episode credited cast:
... Narrator (voice) (as Erik Todd Dellums)
... Herself - Astronomer, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (as Dr. Michelle Thaller)
... Himself - Theoretical Physicist, City University of New York (as Prof. Michio Kaku)
... Himself - Astronomer, Discover Magazine (as Dr. Phil Plait)
David Grinspoon ... Himself - Astrobiologist, Denver Museum of Nature & Science (as Dr. David Grinspoon)
Alex Filippenko ... Himself - Astrophysicist, University of California: Berkeley (as Prof. Alex Filippenko)
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... Himself - Narrator (voice)
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Scientists are discovering volcanoes on worlds we once thought dead. From our nearest planetary neighbour to tiny moons billions of miles away, today we are discovering volcanoes on alien worlds. Are these worlds where, tomorrow, we might find life? Written by Anonymous

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Documentary

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TV-PG
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Release Date:

11 July 2012 (USA)  »

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User Reviews

 
Cool episode on volcanoes
5 July 2017 | by See all my reviews

I am a University student studying biology at the moment, so I am very intrigued by things like the origins of life on earth (astrobiology), deep sea vents, volcanoes, evolution, and so on. This is a very interesting episode of a show that is pretty good in terms of scientific entertainment.

Billions of years ago, Venus was perfect for life to develop, but early events on the planet destroyed those chances. Now it is 900 degrees Fahrenheit on the surface and the atmosphere is thick with far too much carbon dioxide from the ancient volcanoes. We can take what we learn from Venus and use it outside of Astronomy to guide studies like Ecology, Geology, and Sustainable Development.

The episode also details other fascinating facts and marvels of the universe - ice volcanoes (pretty damn cool if you consider how it challenges everything we know about volcanoes), the moons of Jupiter and Saturn, the importance of liquid water for life to exist, and so forth. I may sound like a total geek, but truly, they are awe-some.

Although I found the content of the episode well-researched, well-written for entertainment value, and interesting, I did not like the narrator's voice and that to me is the only problem with the show I can readily pick out. It's definitely worth watching if you're looking for an attention-grabbing program about our solar system's volcanoes or other facts about astronomy, physics, and the other natural sciences.


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