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Forsaken (2015)

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In 1872, an embittered gunslinger named John Henry Clayton attempts to make amends with his estranged father Reverend Samuel Clayton while their community is besieged by ruthless land-grabbers.

Director:

Jon Cassar

Writers:

Brad Mirman, Tari
1 win & 9 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Esther Purves-Smith Esther Purves-Smith ... Shot Child Mother
Kiefer Sutherland ... John Henry Clayton
Donald Sutherland ... Reverend Samuel Clayton
Lex Cassar Lex Cassar ... Tim Slade
Graeme Black Graeme Black ... Hank Plummer
Dave Trimble ... Mr. Parsons
Joe Norman Shaw ... Silver Barrel Bartender
Aaron Poole ... Frank Tillman
Michael Wincott ... Dave Turner
Brian Cox ... James McCurdy
Chris Ippolito ... Bob Waters
Dylan Smith ... Little Ned
Landon Liboiron ... Will Pickard
Michael Mitchell Michael Mitchell ... Clyde Burnett
Justin Michael Carriere Justin Michael Carriere ... Ed Tealy
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Storyline

John Henry returns to his hometown in hopes of repairing his relationship with his estranged father, but a local gang is terrorizing the town. John Henry is the only one who can stop them, however he has abandoned both his gun and reputation as a fearless quick-draw killer. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Redemption. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Western

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence and some language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

Canada | France | USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

19 February 2016 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Forsaken See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$11,000,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

John Henry is also the real name of Doc Holliday. See more »

Goofs

At 1:15 after John Henry has purchased his gun, the shop has "Amunition" spelled wrong on the painted wall/sign outside. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Rev. Clayton: Your mother is dead.
[turns and walks back into the house]
John Henry Clayton: [follows him into the house] I did not know that she had passed.
Rev. Clayton: How could you?
John Henry Clayton: If I had known that she had been sick, I'd...
Rev. Clayton: You would've done what? You would've come home if you knew she was dying? But you couldn't come home when she was living, when she was full of hope?
John Henry Clayton: How did she pass?
Rev. Clayton: In my arms, lying beside me in bed. Weeping. Calling out your name.
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Connections

References Unforgiven (1992) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Solid western, Michael Wincott is a badass!!

It's refreshing that in an age populated by revisionist westerns and snazzy new takes on the ancient genre, some filmmakers just want to play it straight and deliver a good old oater without any newfangled bells and whistles. Jon Cassar's Forsaken does just that, arriving a few years late (turbulent post production issues) but in modest, simple form, here to tell the age old tale of one man who stands up to some evil frontier bankers with stoic heroism. Kiefer Sutherland is John Henry Clayton, a man who has been away from his quiet hometown for nearly a decade. Following a traumatic stint in the war, circumstance led him into the life of the gunfighter. His unannounced return home stirs up old wounds in his preacher father (Donald Sutherland) who cringes in the very presence of his violent aura. John has thrown down the guns and sworn never to pick them up again, but we all know that just ain't true, and when he meets a certain group of unsavory dudes in town, he becomes a time bomb of righteous anger that's liable to go off any time. He spends some time mourning his mother and reconnecting with a lost love (Demi Moore), until the inevitable conflict brews. Corrupt banker James McCurdy (Brian Cox) is buying up farms and forcing families who don't want to sell off their land, using despicable methods carried out by his two goons, vicious Frank Tillman (Aaron Poole) and mercurial 'Gentleman' Dave Turner (Michael Wincott). Tensions arise and everyone finds themselves headed for an unavoidable and blistering conclusion. Kiefer always has a jagged rage simmering just below the surface, which is what made him so perfect as Jack Bauer, another time bomb. He's downright implosive here, delivering the best work I've ever seen him give. He's got a touching scene with his father in which he goes to places I didn't know he was capable of in his work. Donald is quiet, resentful and compassionate, wrestling internally to keep his serenity in the face of injustice. Cox always puts on a good show as the villain, and he's exactly what he needs to be here: bureaucratic menace with just a dash of swagger. It's Wincott who steals the show though, with the best work in the film. He inhabits Dave (and his incredibly dapper costume) with a relaxed, lupine calm, punctuated by sudden bursts of danger and always presided over by the midnight black, raspy croon of a voice that makes him so special. He jaunts along the line between villain and sympathetic antihero so well, the only character in the film to shirk the archetypes, and I was please try reminded of Jason Robard's Cheyenne from Once Upon A Time In The West. His best work in a while as well, but then he's always perfect. The film is refreshingly violent in its gunplay, with an earned brutality that never feels gratuitous, and always satisfying. The production took place in wildest alberta, a trip worth the taking for the breathtaking scenery we get to feast on, especially in an opening credit sequence that is very reminiscent of Eastwood films of yesteryear. It's a landmark in the sense that although both Kiefer and Donald have been in the same film before (Joel Schumacher's underrated A Time To Kill) they never have shared the same frame until now. Trust me, it was worth the wait. They are both excellent, along with their peers in a simple, honest to goodness Western film that should please fervent fans of the genre and moviegoers alike.


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