A family is forced to sell their Italian home.
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Valeria Bruni Tedeschi ... Louise Rossi Levi
Louis Garrel ... Nathan
Filippo Timi ... Ludovic
Marisa Borini Marisa Borini ... La mère
Xavier Beauvois ... Serge
Céline Sallette ... Jeanne
Pippo Delbono ... Le prêtre
André Wilms ... André, le père de Nathan
Silvio Orlando ... Le maire italien
Marie Rivière ... La mère de Nathan
Bernard Nissile Bernard Nissile ... Le moine
Filippo Rutigliano Filippo Rutigliano ... Le jardinier
Anna Morello Anna Morello ... La femme de chambre
Magali Woch Magali Woch ... Jeune femme soupe populaire
Oury Milshtein Oury Milshtein ... Bénévole soupe populaire
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Storyline

A family is forced to sell their Italian home.

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Genres:

Comedy | Drama

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My Heart Belongs to Daddy
Written by Cole Porter
Performed by Eartha Kitt
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User Reviews

 
Going, going, gone: Home
7 March 2015 | by anagram14See all my reviews

A stunning film, both visually and musically. What a wonderful use of "Asturias" in the funeral scene. The Bruni Tedeschis were certainly brought up to appreciate beauty. The director-cum- star is on record as saying she didn't like to think of the film as autobiographical. How, when the film set is her childhood home and life so full of parallels? *possible spoiler* Castello Castagneto Po, bought and renovated by her father, was sold to a Saudi in 2009 after her brother died of AIDS. The only time the grand edifice was opened to the public is in this film. The credits conspicuously omit to name the film set. (But do hang in there and watch them all: if not, you'd miss the most joyous tribute to tomato soup I've ever had the pleasure of seeing.) That said, of course Louise is a caricature. A brave one.

Some critics called "Un château en Italie" self-indulgent, suggesting Bruni Tedeschi was asking for sympathy in scenes like the one where her mother lists the costs of their pile of bricks, or the auction. I beg to differ. She's just telling it the way it is. What more can one ask of a good movie? It gives us a glimpse into a closed world, the most colourful and entertaining one I've seen since Il Gattopardo. (There are a few contemporary documentaries, but Warren Buffet's granddaughter was cut off for her part in Jamie Johnson's "Born Rich". Nobody's going to repeat that any time soon.) On the other hand, great wealth is a wet dream to the public. We see the castles. We don't see the financial and human costs. Bruni Tedeschi questions the golden calf. She not only dares to depict her milieu - she even got her mother to help. Although they were the in-laws of the French president at the time. She must have seen the reactions coming; she'd been there after "Il est plus facile pour un chameau". How did her wealthy peer group react? Perhaps worse... What should she be doing, in the opinion of those critics? The done thing is either to do good and talk about it, American style; or to shut up, European style. She fits neither cliché: she makes films about money and the complex effects it has on people, but not about the doing good. There is a foundation fighting AIDS named after her brother, and she adopted a kid from Africa. Please keep those movies coming, signora!


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Details

Country:

France

Language:

French | Italian | English

Release Date:

30 October 2013 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

A Castle in Italy See more »

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Box Office

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$2,579,459
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Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color
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