8.1/10
621,340
1,089 user 593 critic

Inside Out (2015)

Trailer
0:32 | Trailer
After young Riley is uprooted from her Midwest life and moved to San Francisco, her emotions - Joy, Fear, Anger, Disgust and Sadness - conflict on how best to navigate a new city, house, and school.

Directors:

Pete Docter, Ronnie Del Carmen (co-director)

Writers:

Pete Docter (original story by), Ronnie Del Carmen (original story by) | 7 more credits »
Popularity
513 ( 123)
Top Rated Movies #158 | Won 1 Oscar. Another 99 wins & 115 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Amy Poehler ... Joy (voice)
Phyllis Smith ... Sadness (voice)
Richard Kind ... Bing Bong (voice)
Bill Hader ... Fear (voice)
Lewis Black ... Anger (voice)
Mindy Kaling ... Disgust (voice)
Kaitlyn Dias ... Riley (voice)
Diane Lane ... Mom (voice)
Kyle MacLachlan ... Dad (voice)
Paula Poundstone ... Forgetter Paula (voice)
Bobby Moynihan ... Forgetter Bobby (voice)
Paula Pell ... Dream Director / Mom's Anger / Additional Voices (voice)
Dave Goelz ... Subconscious Guard Frank (voice)
Frank Oz ... Subconscious Guard Dave (voice)
Josh Cooley ... Jangles (voice)
Edit

Storyline

Growing up can be a bumpy road, and it's no exception for Riley, who is uprooted from her Midwest life when her father starts a new job in San Francisco. Like all of us, Riley is guided by her emotions - Joy, Fear, Anger, Disgust and Sadness. The emotions live in Headquarters, the control center inside Riley's mind, where they help advise her through everyday life. As Riley and her emotions struggle to adjust to a new life in San Francisco, turmoil ensues in Headquarters. Although Joy, Riley's main and most important emotion, tries to keep things positive, the emotions conflict on how best to navigate a new city, house and school. Written by Pixar

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A Major Emotion Picture See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for mild thematic elements and some action | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Sadness' importance to Riley's mental and emotional health is telegraphed right from the first scene. She's shown making Riley sad, and thus cry which alerts her parents that she needs food. If babies didn't cry, you wouldn't know when to feed them, or that something else like a dirty diaper needs attention. The secondary function of sadness empathy- is also shown in various ways: Riley's Sadness's ability to console Bing Bong over the loss of his rocket is what allows him to compose himself and move on from it where Joy's attempt to distract him through short-term optimism failed. This secondary role is also shown through how Mrs. Andersen's mind operates: she is the parent who is the most in tune and aware of her daughter's emotional state, being the first to pick up that something is not quite right with Riley. See more »

Goofs

During dream production, when Riley is dreaming that her teeth are falling out, a production worker is dropping "teeth" in front of the camera. Since the camera is supposed to show Riley's point of view the falling teeth shouldn't be seen by the camera. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Joy: Do you ever look at someone and wonder, "What is going on inside their head?" Well, I know. Well, I know Riley's head.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Emotion circles, resembling all the 5 emotions, appear and disappear in the background, while moving around like particles. See more »

Alternate Versions

In some countries, the sport game the father is thinking about at the dinner table is football (soccer) instead of hockey. See more »

Connections

References Sesame Street (1969) See more »

Soundtracks

Grim Grinning Ghosts (Otherworldly Concerto)
Written by Buddy Baker & Xavier Atencio
Performed by Gaylord Carter
Courtesy of Walt Disney Records
See more »

User Reviews

 
Tears of Joy
20 September 2015 | by OliverGingerSee all my reviews

Before I start, I will say this; I'm writing this after coming back from a second viewing of Inside Out. Both viewings were out of choice. That's not a unique thing, but I very rarely watch films more than once at the cinema, mainly because life is short, or rather, life is too quick for me. But there's two main reasons why people watch some films more than once at the cinema, especially where I come from; either the film was interesting, detailed, or multi-layered and needs to be seen again to sink in properly, or, it was really, really good.

In this case, for me, it's the latter. That's not to say that the film isn't interesting, detailed or multi-layered, but the reason that was repeating in my head to see it again was 'it's really, really good.' But is it? Yes, yes of course it is... Speaking with a bunch of friends with whom I saw it the first time, a risky phrase was unanimously agreed upon, which was that we 'trust the Pixar team to do the right thing.' Needless (totally needless) to say that expectations were high, and frankly, they were surpassed.

Even though the film is what we come to expect from Pixar (the universal moral themes, the perfect balance between comedy and sadness, and visually stunning animation and action sequences), I didn't feel that I had seen it all before, and neither was it repetitive nor 'ordinary'. The film hits all the high notes, with perfect intonation, and with discipline and passion. As touched on before, the balance between humour and sadness is strong and impressive; the amount of emotions that the film displays and takes us through is varied and immersive, yet not overwhelming. The film executes such clever ideas with simplicity and ease, leaving us to feel for the characters rather than worry about the 'science' of it all, or even being worried about 'not getting it'.

The animation is constantly eye-drawing and detailed; the characters' glistening skin is particularly wondrous. And what great characters they are. Riley is brilliantly sympathetic throughout, even with her difficult mood swings, and the supporting characters are perfectly entertaining. One might think that the superficial nature of the characters (Anger is angry, Fear is always scared etc.) would become old quickly, however the fun never diminishes, thanks to a witty script, expressive animation, and very strong voice performances from the entire cast.

However, to top all this off, the real gem comes from the character of Joy, surely a strong contender in the list of Pixar's greatest characters. Even though we are inside the head of Riley for the majority of the film, and the events that drive the movie are essentially her reactions to her new world (moving from Minnesota to San Francisco), the story is Joy's. Being probably the most flawed character in the film (paradoxically, maybe), it's her journey we care about the most, and she ends up being the most in-depth character in the film, occasionally questioning her actions in the first half (well, the cynics will be), and becoming the most sympathetic by the end. Amy Poehler's outstanding performance makes Joy simultaneously the strongest and weakest character in the film (emotionally, that is).

After all of this, the freshness of the ideas, the simplified neuroscience, the technical brilliance (saying that, Giacchino's score is probably the most subtle thing in the film, exquisitely putting the finishing touches on the most emotional scenes), fleshed out characters and universal themes, all of this comes together simply to entertain us, to let us escape, and to release us emotionally, which it does by making us laugh and cry in an even and fair manner.

And you will laugh. And you will cry. And it is fun to do so. Thank god we're living in a time when Pixar is making these films.


377 of 799 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 1,089 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Portuguese

Release Date:

19 June 2015 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Untitled Pixar Movie That Takes You Inside the Mind See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$175,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$90,440,272, 21 June 2015

Gross USA:

$356,921,711

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$858,071,350
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color | Color (Rec. 2020) (some scenes)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed