Midsomer Murders (1997– )
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The Dark Rider 

The DeQuettevilles and the Fleetwoods have been enemies since the English Civil War. Now the DeQuettevilles are dying, each first seeing a headless horseman. Is the ancient feud to blame? Or is there a modern murderer at large?

Director:

Alex Pillai

Writers:

Michael Aitkens (screenplay), Caroline Graham (characters)
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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
Neil Dudgeon ... DCI John Barnaby
Jason Hughes ... DS Ben Jones
Fiona Dolman ... Sarah Barnaby
Tamzin Malleson ... Kate Wilding
Eleanor Bron ... Izzy DeQuetteville
James Callis ... Toby DeQuetteville / Julian DeQuetteville
Raquel Cassidy ... Diana DeQuetteville
Kerry Fox ... Betty DeQuetteville
William Gaunt ... Ludo DeQuetteville
Natalie Mendoza ... Sasha Fleetwood
Paul Ritter ... Harry Fleetwood
Murray Melvin ... Bentham DeQuetteville
James Clay ... Simon DeQuetteville
Louisa Clein ... Amanda Harding
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Storyline

As the aristocratic De Qutteville family prepares for a Civil war reenactment battle, elderly Bentham De Quetteville falls to his death from a roof after seeing a headless horseman. The family legend is that this is the ghost of ancestor Sir Geoffrey De Quetteville whose appearance spells death to those who encounter him. Reasonable Toby De Quetteville's first wife died after an apparent meeting with the spectre, a fact which traumatised his son Simon. Barnaby is sceptical until Toby's unpleasant twin Julian also dies after seeing the horseman. Toby's ambitious wife Betty, who will become lady of the manor if her father-in-law Ludo also dies, becomes a prime suspect, as do neighbouring couple the Fleetwoods, long involved in a land dispute with the De Quettevilles. Barnaby must decide which of them, or any other family member is committing murder whilst perpetuating the myth of the dark rider. Written by don @ minifie-1

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Mystery

Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

1 February 2012 (UK) See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Bentley Productions See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Both Kate Wilding as well as Barnaby are wrong when they speak of the fallen stone figure. They both call it a gargoyle. A gargoyle is in fact a figure designed to spout water from the roof and away from the building. What they ought to call the carved stone figure is "chimera" or "grotesque". See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Bentham DeQuetteville: Ge... Geoff... Geoffrey.
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Soundtracks

Main Theme
Composed by Jim Parker
Theremin played by Celia Sheen
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User Reviews

 
The masterpiece of the 15th season.
1 April 2013 | by dsmoscowrentSee all my reviews

A really good classical MM episode! Aitkens did again a terrific job! The scripts written by him are always unique and unexpectedly twisted. Though this episode reminds of the first Aitkens' script "The vixen's run" (family secrets and so on), still it remains genuine and fresh. The idea of a horseman without a head is just brilliant and was fulfilled in a very convincing, unobtrusive way. Twin-brothers, one of whom gets killed and another one is doomed by the Headless Horsemen - another good idea of Aitkens. The allusions to the English Civil War are also to be mentioned here. And of course - the family feud between the DeQuettevilled and the Fleetwoods - the favourite artifice of Aitkens who presented us once again a real masterpiece that is certainly worth seeing twice. Aitkens managed to create the atmosphere of suspense and mystery evolving around an ancient family ghost, at the same time it all doesn't seem to be the raving of a madman, the plot is built very logically, no loose end or unexplained tricks, you fully enjoy an intellectual battle with the suspense master like Aitkens. And of course the biggest surprise awaits you in the end since the identity of the culprit is absolutely unexpected, though the motives are quite understandable and comprehensible. In one word, Aitkens did it again. It seems that he is the only script writer who saves the series nowadays.


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