5.6/10
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40 user 27 critic

A Dark Truth (2012)

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1:46 | Trailer
A former CIA operative turned political talk show host is hired by a disaffected corporate shareholder to expose her company's cover-up of an incident and deaths in an Ecuadorian village.

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1 win. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
... Ben
Alfredo Álvarez Calderón ... General Aguila (as Alfredo Alvarez-Calderon)
Josh Bainbridge ... Mattie
Danielle Baker ... Reporter #2 / Reporter
... Tony Green
... Renaldo
Sarah Bryant ... Robert Johnson's Assistant
... Baddie #1
Rod Carley ... Cop
... Baddie #5
... Clive Bell
... Bruce Swinton
Jorge Contreras ... Neck Slit Villager
... Karen Begosian
Elias Caamaño Perez ... Assaulting soldier (as Elias Caamano)
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Storyline

A large international water purification company has a major filtration system malfunction in Ecuador, South America resulting in a typhoid breakout in the town. Government security forces move in and shoot the villagers to prevent the information getting out and spoiling the next big deal the company is working on in South Africa. Morgan Swinton, the daughter in the family controlled business discovers what is happening and hires an ex-CIA agent, Jack Begosian, to go down and get the information on what is really happening. The company's security force, working with the brother, are overly aggressive and have secretive special handling resources to deal with the woman, her contract investigator and the witnesses from the village that survived to prevent anything impacting the pending closure of the next multi-million dollar deal. There are homicides, suicides, double crosses and lots of gratuitous violence before the truth gets told. Written by Prairiekid

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Escape the jungle. Expose the truth.

Genres:

Action | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence and disturbing images | See all certifications »

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Release Date:

29 November 2012 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Truth  »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$630, 6 January 2013, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$5,750, 27 January 2013
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Did You Know?

Goofs

Esmeraldas in Ecuador is located by the seaside and not in the jungle hills as shown in the movie. See more »

Quotes

Jack Begosian: Um, when you can't effect change from within, I mean positive change, you have an obligation if you're at all conscious, to get out and try other things.
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Connections

Referenced in Behind the Truth (2013) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Vigorous, ruthlessly bloody, choppy and glib, actually...skip it.
20 September 2013 | by See all my reviews

A Dark Truth (2012)

An ambitious movie, intending more than it achieves. At stake is a critique of the corporate cornering of water rights in the Third World. This is a real problem, and deserves better than this by Hollywood, if a big movie is the way to go about it. (A far better attempt, and a far better movie, is "También la lluvia", or "Even the Rain," set in Bolivia and starring Gael García Bernal.)

The really great actor here is Forest Whitaker, who has a fairly small role as a South American rebel leader with a true conscience. The lead actor is the ever-struggling (if sincere) Andy Garcia, who is a retired South American CIA man with a quasi-political radio talk show to keep him and his troubled wife and child alive and very well.

You can smell the connection that has to be made here, between Whitaker's jungle world of righteous rebellion and Garcia's safely withdrawn world of buried political misdeeds. The third world (narratively) is the big water purification company itself, with a slightly evil corporate head and his slow-to-wake sister who finally realizes the corporation their father started is corrupt and murderous. This third leg of the triangle is complex, and a bit unconvincing with its too-easy array of killers and corporate spies and Ecuadorian accomplices all a cell phone call away.

I might make clear here the movie is not a dud but it's very troubled, both formally (editing and writing issues, mostly) and in terms of its purported content. That is, ultra-violent scenes of mass murder are used over and over again to press home how ruthless and bloody the corporate heads are, safe in their glassed offices in Toronto. (Yes, the corporation is Canadian, which I guess is a nice novelty since Canadians are so famously nice.) The actual problem of water use and clean water supplies for the villages shown is never explored. Instead we have people running and getting gunned down with weirdly nonsensical abandon. A lot.

The more you dwell on this the more you realize the movie makers are as evil as the corporate bosses they are portraying. They use this horrifying cinematic mayhem to draw you in and make you (in theory) sympathize with the rebels, and with the ordinary people who just want to live and have clean water. Well, of course! So then we get back to Garcia drawn to the jungle to single-handedly (with a revolver) save these rebels from the advancing army troops. (Yes, Andy Garcia plays the Matt Damon character here, which is really quite funny at times, and not on purpose.)

So eventually you see through all the seriousness to a pretty poorly cobbled together movie with lots of overlapping plots and some very very fast solutions to messy problems (like getting the wanted rebel leader out of Ecuador on an airplane without a blink). I'd skip this mess for lots of reasons. And go see "Even the Rain" with its much gentler flaws.


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