7.1/10
33,537
132 user 185 critic

The Railway Man (2013)

Trailer
2:29 | Trailer

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Prime Video

A former British Army officer, who was tortured as a prisoner of war at a Japanese labor camp during World War II, discovers that the man responsible for much of his treatment is still alive and sets out to confront him.

Director:

Jonathan Teplitzky

Writers:

Frank Cottrell Boyce (screenplay), Andy Paterson (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
7 wins & 20 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Jeremy Irvine ... Young Eric
Colin Firth ... Eric
Stellan Skarsgård ... Finlay
Nicole Kidman ... Patti
Michael MacKenzie Michael MacKenzie ... Sutton
Jeffrey Daunton Jeffrey Daunton ... Burton
Tanroh Ishida ... Young Takeshi Nagase
Bryan Probets Bryan Probets ... Major York
Tom Stokes ... Withins
Tom Hobbs ... Thorlby
Sam Reid ... Young Finlay
Akos Armont ... Jackson
Takato Kitamoto Takato Kitamoto ... Japanese Officer
Keith Fleming Keith Fleming ... Removal Man
Ben Aldridge ... Baliff
Edit

Storyline

Eric Lomax was one of thousands of Allied prisoners of war forced to work on the construction of the Thai/Burma railway during WW2. His experiences, after the secret radio he built to bring news and hope to his colleagues was discovered, left him traumatised and shut off from the world. Years later, he met Patti, a beautiful woman, on a train and fell in love. Patti was determined to rid Eric of his demons. Discovering that the young Japanese officer who haunted her husband was still alive, she faced a terrible decision. Should Eric be given a chance to confront his tormentor? Would she stand by him, whatever he did? Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Revenge is never a straight line.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for disturbing prisoner of war violence | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Country:

Switzerland | UK | Australia

Language:

English | Japanese

Release Date:

23 May 2014 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Un pasado imborrable See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$18,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

£1,230,483 (United Kingdom), 12 January 2014, Limited Release

Opening Weekend USA:

$61,845, 13 April 2014, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$4,438,438

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$24,123,142
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Jeremy Irvine was cast as the younger version of Colin Firth's character, after Firth himself suggested him for the role. See more »

Goofs

After the surrender of British forces in Singapore, the Union Flag is lowered, and the Nisshoki, or Hinomaru (red disk on a white field) is hoisted in its stead. However, as Singapore was being occupied by the Japanese military, and not, at this point, yet a part of the Japanese empire, the flag should have been the Kyokujitsu-ki, or 'Rising Sun' flag. The flags shown later, hanging from military vehicles, also Nisshoki, are correct, as Thailand had at this point been effectively annexed, and was now part of the Japanese Empire. The Thai-Japanese alliance was signed on December 21st, 1941. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Eric: At the beginning of time, the clock struck one. A drop of dew, and the clock struck two. From the dew grew a tree, and the clock struck three. Then the tree made a door, and the clock struck four. Then man came alive, And the clock struck five. Count not, waste not, the hours of the clock. Behold I stand at the door and knock.
See more »


Soundtracks

Introduction (Prelude) from Gadfly Suite
Performed by Ukraine National Symphony Orchestra and Theodore Kuchar (Conductor)
Composed by Dmitri Shostakovich (as D. Shostakovich)
Published by Native Tongue Publishing
Licensed Courtesy of Select Audio Visual Distribution on behalf of Naxos
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
powerful and emotive WWII autobiographical tale of PTSD and triumph in adversity
13 December 2013 | by HelenMarySee all my reviews

Saw this as a test screening some time ago but wasn't allowed to post until it was released, consequently I've not seen the finished film but the test version affected me quite a bit. Based on a true story - Eric Lomax (Firth) - was building the Thai/Burma railway WWII as a POW. The conditions were horrific, treatment atrocious and Lomax clearly suffered PTSD, although it wasn't diagnosed yet - the film was set in the 70s. In an attempt to lay ghosts of his past to rest he travels back to revisit the sites of his incarceration and comes face to face with a Japanese officer from that time who was central to his torture.

It's a grey, period-style, sombre film, there's little in the way of humour and the only colour at the beginning is Nicole Kidman's (more or less extraneous) role as the "love interest." Her role was apparently meant to be played by Rachel Weisz and I think that would have been a better choice, and it bugs me that Kidman is first listing on the credits when Lomax' role is the titular role, and it's HIS book that the film is based on. However, the synopsis puts emphasis on her standing by her man and seeing him through his adversity and she does, and is good in the role she is given, and in that she was well chosen played down in her looks to given some small-town glamour.

It's a slow pace and if you like bells and whistles and CGI rather than real life and emotions then don't bother with this... it's a gripping, sad, heartbreaking and heartwarming tale or triumph over adversity, courage and strength of spirit with an ending that if you don't have a tear in your eye then you are dead inside.

Colin Firth, I think, is well cast and plays stayed, rather eccentric and dull due to his brokenness extremely well. He is fascinated by railways and trains (which is surprising) since his experiences and we meet his love interest on a train. His emotions turn erratically and he suffered terrifying nightmares, working through the pain/suffering of his character with a quiet studied grace. The star turn in my opinion... and all at the test screening agreed... is Hiroyuki Sanada who played Lomax' nemesis as an adult. He had a very challenging role and was superb. He played his role with so much calm that you could believe his conversion experience and he made the tale come alive and be very believable. Nothing he did was superfluous and even the tiniest nuances of his actions were obviously deliberate and perfect, his facial expressions were... oh enough to make me weep in places. I'd like to see him get applauded for it - and will look out for him in other films (eg 47 Ronin). Stellan Skarsgard (always excellent) was good in the role he played but at the test screening we all questioned why someone without a heavy English accent was cast for the role of an English soldier in his middle age when in his young scenes the actor who played Finlay was quintessentially British with no explanation as to why he is suddenly Swedish, "After the war he went to Sweden and has lived there" would have done - maybe they've done that now. His character too was a tragedy, also not coping at all with life after war.

The young actors playing the tough scenes in Japan building the railway had the hardest roles and Jeremy Irvine and Sam Reid did their older selves proud in some quite harrowing scenes, and oftentimes they really did look emaciated, thin and on their last legs. The film pulls no punches but does leave the terrible experience that Lomax suffered as a cliff-hanger to the last.

A powerful film, not for the feint or lighthearted, I fear, but certainly if you are interested in history, and enjoy good performance led character pieces you will find this an excellent cinema-going experience. I do recommend taking something to dry your eyes with and stay to the end to learn about Lomax and Nagase - the real people. The truth in the story adds so much more to the film.


66 of 82 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 132 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed