In the antebellum United States, Solomon Northup, a free black man from upstate New York, is abducted and sold into slavery.

Director:

Steve McQueen

Writers:

John Ridley (screenplay by), Solomon Northup (based on "Twelve Years a Slave" by)
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740 ( 75)
Top Rated Movies #203 | Won 3 Oscars. Another 240 wins & 336 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Chiwetel Ejiofor ... Solomon Northup
Dwight Henry ... Uncle Abram
Dickie Gravois Dickie Gravois ... Overseer
Bryan Batt ... Judge Turner
Ashley Dyke ... Anna
Kelsey Scott ... Anne Northup
Quvenzhané Wallis ... Margaret Northup
Cameron Zeigler Cameron Zeigler ... Alonzo Northup
Tony Bentley ... Mr. Moon
Scoot McNairy ... Brown
Taran Killam ... Hamilton
Christopher Berry ... Burch
Bill Camp ... Radburn
Mister Mackey Jr. Mister Mackey Jr. ... Randall
Chris Chalk ... Clemens

A Guide to the Films of Steve McQueen

Through detailed close-ups, single-take dialogues, and powerhouse performances, Oscar-winning filmmaker Steve McQueen has shown audiences his unflinching perspectives on real-world drama.

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Storyline

Based on an incredible true story of one man's fight for survival and freedom. In the pre-Civil War United States, Solomon Northup, a free black man from upstate New York, is abducted and sold into slavery. Facing cruelty personified by a malevolent slave owner, as well as unexpected kindnesses, Solomon struggles not only to stay alive, but to retain his dignity. In the twelfth year of his unforgettable odyssey, Solomon's chance meeting with a Canadian abolitionist will forever alter his life. Written by Fox Searchlight

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The extraordinary true story of Solomon Northup


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence/cruelty, some nudity and brief sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Tibeats mocks the black men by singing a hopeful song, urging them to run away lest they be caught by the "patty roller." This word, also spelled "patter roller" among other variants, was slang for patrolman. The Patrols, also called the Regulators, were semi-official secret police who kept slaves in line in antebellum times. These groups also served as a model for the post-war terror society Ku Klux Klan. See more »

Goofs

Near the beginning while Solomon is being bamboozled by Mr Brown and Mr Hamilton, Mr Brown says "If we could persuade you to accompany us as far as Washington..." His lips are not saying the word "Washington". He might well be saying "New York", although this is not conclusive. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Overseer: Alright now, y'all fresh niggers. Y'all gonna be in the cuttin' gang.
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Soundtracks

My Lord, Sunshine
Written by Nicholas Britell
Performed by Roosevelt Credit and David Hughey
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User Reviews

 
Roll Jordan Roll
18 October 2013 | by dvc5159See all my reviews

A random and encounter has led Solomon Northup from living freely in New York to being kidnapped and sold into slavery in Louisiana, getting handed over to various slave owners. There, Solomon witnesses numerous acts of cruelty that no man should ever face.

As I stared at the movie screen with full dread, I was reeling back at certain scenes I had just witnessed. There were good films and television shows about slavery before, and they had various nuances at how to tackle slavery. This film is part of said resurgence of the sub- genre, hot on the heels of "Django Unchained" and "The Butler". But while the former relinquishes on Spaghetti Western entertainment more than attempting to address the issue in a political light as the latter, Steve McQueen's "12 Years a Slave" shuts those two up, and perhaps the entire sub-genre, for good. I doubt any future slavery-themed film will be as harrowing as this one was.

Steve McQueen is a fearless filmmaker, continuing his streak of unfiltered brutality within human depths. He frames his actors' faces in extreme close-up, the eyes staring into despair, the nostrils fuming in aggression. Naked flesh are shown not because of erotic content, but rather because of desperation and futility. Long takes and wide shots are not uncommon in his films, and here they showcase a plethora of fantastic scenes and performances that work to discomfort the viewer as much as possible. McQueen doesn't just allow the audience to tackle slavery, he guts the audience and leaves them for the consequences. This is an extremely uncomfortable film to watch. Beautifully shot locations are placeholders for unsettling sequences before and after, contemplated by Hans Zimmer's poignant and at times horrifying score. This all works to create a nightmarish time and place where hell walks on Earth.

Central to all of this is the performance of Chiwetel Ejiofor as Solomon. Ejiofor showcases that he is a natural force to be reckoned with in this film, after a decade of mostly supporting characters. He spaces out in despair as the camera lingers onto him for solid minutes, not a word spoken. Another sequence shows him mourning the death of a fellow worker, in which the singing of the surrounding group compels him and shakes him down to tears. These scenes follow earlier ones where he is a classy, free man in the upper states, mingling happily with the crowd and partaking in fanciful music sessions. It is a tour-de-force performance.

A fine ensemble of established and up-and-coming actors surround Ejiofor in his limelight - Paul Dano, Paul Giammati, Alfre Woodard, Sarah Paulson, even Brad Pitt and Benedict Cumberbatch, but none so ferociously as McQueen regular Michael Fassbender as the despicable, sadistic plantation owner Edwin Epps. So excellent and terrifying is Fassbender's portrayal of such a merciless and barbaric person, that the mere sight of him will either cause audience members unfamiliar to him to flinch.

I was left speechless as the credits rolled. A lesser film would have added tacked-on sentimentality/exaggeration and politically influenced claptrap. Not this one. This is a movie to watch as a reminder of how powerful the human spirit can endeavor, and how lucky all of us have grown past that dreadful time in history. The full effect of it has not been felt in movies before, until now.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA | UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

8 November 2013 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Twelve Years a Slave See more »

Filming Locations:

New Orleans, Louisiana, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$20,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$923,715, 20 October 2013

Gross USA:

$56,671,993

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$187,733,202
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

DTS (Digital DTS Sound)| Dolby Digital | SDDS | Dolby Surround 7.1 | DTS (5.1 surround)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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