(2011)

News

Watch: Mark Duplass and Jason Blum Talk Found Footage Horror 'Creep,' Now on Netflix

Watch: Mark Duplass and Jason Blum Talk Found Footage Horror 'Creep,' Now on Netflix
As busy as he is, multi-tasker Duplass ("The League," "Cyrus," "Your Sister's Sister") enjoys collaborating with young filmmakers--in this case recent Cal Arts grad Patrick Brice, whose thesis film "Maurice" played Rotterdam and won the Grand Jury Prize for Best Short Doc at the Florida Film Festival. They co-wrote and filmed this found-footage two-hander off a ten-page outline. Instead of writing a long script, they skipped to the shooting phase, spending a few weeks at a remote cabin near Big Bear, California. Their first footage was "terrible," admits Duplass. And then they reshot. And reshot, "shooting as we go."  Obsessed with watching the odd behavior of real people, Duplass never forgot his own three-hour experience dealing with breaking down a loft bed that he was buying that was supposed to be unassembled: "This guy talked about his divorce, how 'Star Wars'...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Exclusive Interview: Mark Duplass And Patrick Brice Talk Creep

On the surface, Creep looks like yet another found footage movie and the kind that Blumhouse Productions keeps churning out month after month. But once you watch it, you’ll discover something different and far more unnerving about it.

The film follows Aaron (Patrick Brice, who also co-wrote and directed), a videographer who accepts an offer from a man named Josef (Mark Duplass) on Craigslist. After they meet, Josef explains that he has terminal cancer and that he wants to record a diary for his unborn son to let him know the kind of person he is a la Michael Keaton in My Life. But as Aaron’s keeps filming Josef, he comes to find that Josef is not at all who he appears to be. In fact, he proves to be far more unhinged than Aaron could ever imagine.

During a recent press day held for Creep in Los Angeles,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Females On Film: Ranking the summer's biggest box office winners based on lady roles

  • Hitfix
Females On Film: Ranking the summer's biggest box office winners based on lady roles
Films with great women’s roles aren’t always great films. Films with poor female representation aren’t necessarily bad films. But poorly written female roles will always be a problem for cinema so long as they continue to persist. The damsel in distress. Angel-whore. The token girl. Trophy wives. Mother, daughter, sister. The unconditional love interest. These are among the popular clichés most frequently applied to female characters as they’re written on the page. Some films are so desperate for conflict that they just keep going to the well without altering the mold. Have women not earned the right by now to play more villains, complicated lovers, a-holes, The Best Friends, soldiers, comic reliefs or leads? Can a woman be sexy in a film and still have a great role? Yes. Give her agency. Can a woman support other characters but still have a great role? Yes. Keep her vital.
See full article at Hitfix »

RaDiUS-twc Partners with Blum and Duplass on 'Creep' Trilogy, "Utterly Insane New Franchise" (Exclusive Video)

RaDiUS-twc Partners with Blum and Duplass on 'Creep' Trilogy,
Following the SXSW premiere of low-budget psychological thriller "Creep," RADiUS-twc is partnering with Mark and Jay Duplass and Jason Blum's Blumhouse Productions on a "Creep" trilogy which Duplass calls an "utterly insane new franchise." (My SXSW interview with Blum and Duplass is below.) SXSW often features a movie that Mark Duplass has dabbled in. Thriller "Creep" was this year's model. As busy as he is, multi-tasker Duplass ("The League," "Cyrus," "Safety Not Guaranteed," "Your Sister's Sister") enjoys collaborating with young filmmakers--in this case recent Cal Arts grad Patrick Brice, whose thesis film "Maurice" played Rotterdam and won the Grand Jury Prize for Best Short Doc at the Florida Film Festival. They co-wrote and filmed this found-footage two-hander off a ten-page outline. Instead of writing a long script, they skipped to the shooting phase, spending a few weeks at a remote cabin near Big Bear,...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Mark Duplass & Jason Blum Talk 'Creep,' SXSW Review and Roundup (Exclusive Video)

Mark Duplass & Jason Blum Talk 'Creep,' SXSW Review and Roundup (Exclusive Video)
SXSW often features a movie that Mark Duplass has dabbled in. Thriller "Creep" is this year's model.  As busy as he is, multi-tasker Duplass ("The League," "Cyrus," "Your Sister's Sister") enjoys collaborating with young filmmakers--in this case recent Cal Arts grad Patrick Brice, whose thesis film "Maurice" played Rotterdam and won the Grand Jury Prize for Best Short Doc at the Florida Film Festival. They co-wrote and filmed this two-hander found-footage thriller off a ten-page outline. Instead of writing a long script, they skipped to the shooting phase, spending a few weeks at a remote cabin near Big Bear Lake, California. Their first footage was "terrible," admits Duplass. And then they reshot. And reshot, "shooting as we go."  Obsessed with watching the odd behavior of real people, Duplass never forgot his own three-hour experience dealing with breaking down a loft bed that he was buying that was supposed to be unassembled:.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

2012 Chicago Underground Film Festival: Award Winners

The 19th annual Chicago Underground Film Festival, which just ran for the entire first week of June at the Gene Siskel Film Center, have announced their award winners. Picking the winners this year was a jury composed of Julia Gibbs (University of Chicago’s Film Studies Center), Dan Koretzky (Drag City Records) and Jonathan Marlow (Fandor).

Awards were given in seven categories, each of which have a singular winning film and several honorable mentions. Taking home the coveted Made in Chicago Award was Jesse McLean‘s experimental short film Remote, a haunting meditation on nature and technology.

Other short films winning awards were Ben Russell‘s ethnographic film River Rites for Best Documentary Short, Bryan Boyce‘s hilarious Walt Disney’s Taxi Driver for Best Film Using Appropriation or Pre-existing Material and Peter Jessien Laugesen’s Nature’s Voice for Best Animation/Experimental Short.

On the feature film front, Daniel Schmidt
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

2012 Chicago Underground Film Festival: Official Lineup

Having been around for eighteen years, the Chicago Underground Film Festival has continually changed what it defines as “underground.”

So its 19th annual edition, which will be held on May 31 to June 7 at the Gene Siskel Film Center, feels like its most experimental edition in recent years.

While things kick off on the 31st with the Vice-produced anthology film The Fourth Dimension by Alexsei Fedorchenko, Harmony Korine and Jan Kwiecinski, the rest of the fest is packed with feature-length and short experimental work, documentaries and alternative narratives.

Some of the experimental feature highlights include the vastly prolific Robert Todd‘s Master Plan, which examines theories of modern housing from private residences to prisons; Australia’s two-person art collective Soda_Jerk’s epic rip on media piracy, Hollywood Burn; Michael Kosakowski’s compendium on murder fantasies, Zero Killing; L.A. filmmaker Daniel Martinico’s meditation on the acting process, Ok, Good
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

2011 Nevada City Film Festival: Official Lineup

The 11th annual Nevada City Film Festival, running Aug. 18-21, is four nights crammed full with short films, several feature-length documentaries, one dramatic feature, stand-up comedy performances and more surprises, all nestled within the rolling hills of Northern California.

The fest opens with the feature documentary Someplace With a Mountain, directed by Steve Goodall and narrated by Chevy Chase. The film tells the story of the embattled people of the Puluwat atoll who are besieged by the Pacific Ocean itself. Rising waters due to global warming are making their land slowly disappear beneath the waves.

Other feature docs include music-based films We Are Wizards, directed by Josh Koury, about the oddball phenomenon of rock bands that only craft songs about the world of Harry Potter; and Everyday Sunshine, directed by Lev Anderson and Chris Metzler, which profiles the legendary ska punk band Fishbone that continues to bring their enthusiastic music to the masses.
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

See also

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