7.5/10
41,825
79 user 211 critic

The Imposter (2012)

Trailer
2:32 | Trailer
A documentary centered on a young man in Spain who claims to a grieving Texas family that he is their 16-year-old son who has been missing for 3 years.

Director:

Bart Layton
Won 1 BAFTA Film Award. Another 11 wins & 30 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Nicholas Barclay Nicholas Barclay ... Himself - Missing Person (archive footage)
Carey Gibson Carey Gibson ... Herself - Nicholas' Sister
Bryan Gibson Bryan Gibson ... Himself - Nicholas' Brother-in-Law
Beverly Dollarhide Beverly Dollarhide ... Herself - Nicholas' Mother
Frédéric Bourdin Frédéric Bourdin ... Himself - Imposter (as Frederic Bourdin)
Nancy Fisher Nancy Fisher ... Herself - Special Agent, FBI (as Nancy B. Fisher)
Philip French Philip French ... Himself - Consul General, U. S. Embassy in Spain (as Phillip French)
Codey Gibson Codey Gibson ... Himself - Nicholas' Nephew
Charlie Parker Charlie Parker ... Himself - Private Investigator
Bruce Perry Bruce Perry ... Himself - Texas Children's Hospital (as Bruce D. Perry)
Allie Hostetler Allie Hostetler ... Herself - Nicholas' Neighbor (as Allie Hosteiler)
Kevin Hendricks Kevin Hendricks ... Himself - Nicholas' Childhood Friend
Adam O'Brian ... Frédéric Bourdin
Anna Ruben ... Carey Gibson
Cathy Dresbach Cathy Dresbach ... Nancy Fisher
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Storyline

A documentary centered on a young man in Spain who claims to a grieving Texas family that he is their 16-year-old son who has been missing for 3 years.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

There are two sides to every lie. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Avalon [Spain] | Official Facebook

Country:

UK

Language:

English | Spanish

Release Date:

24 August 2012 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

Az Imposztor See more »

Filming Locations:

Phoenix, Arizona, USA See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$22,379, 15 July 2012, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$892,409, 23 November 2012
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Goofs

High mountains visible in background in at least five scenes including sister's airport departure, Nicholas boarding school bus, kids hanging out in vacant lot. Supposedly set in San Antonio which is in the Texas 'Hill Country' but we see real mountains in the background. End credits reveal recreated scenes were shot in Arizona including Phoenix, Buckeye and Avondale where there are numerous mountain ranges often visible in any direction you look at varying distances. See more »

Quotes

Frédéric Bourdin - Imposter: Before I was born, I definitely had the wrong identity. I already didn't know - I was already prepared not to know who I really was. A new identity with a real passport, an American passport... I could go to the U.S., go to school there, live with that family, and just being someone and don't have never again to worry about being identified. I saw the opportunity.
See more »

Connections

Version of The Chameleon (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

Wayfaring Stranger
Written by David Eugene Edwards & Jean Yves Tola (as Edwards/Tola)
Performed by Sixteen Horsepower (as 16 Horsepower)
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
A bizarre, chilling, surprising & thoroughly enthralling 99-minute eye-popping experience.
3 October 2012 | by TheSquissSee all my reviews

There are far too few documentaries on general release so it's a rare pleasure to sit in a dark screening room with six other people to watch another example of bizarre real life unfold across the screen. The Imposter is one of those documentaries where you sit there with the sense of incredulity growing as every twist in the plot reveals itself. It's not as jaw-droppingly absurd as the excellent Tabloid and it isn't remotely funny, but it is a fascinating and compelling experience. I'll qualify that; the story of The Imposter is fascinating while the manner in which it is presented to us upon the screen is absolutely compelling and worthy of the plaudits it has so far received, including a nomination for the Grand Jury Prize at this year's Sundance Film Festival and a gong in the same category at the Miami Film Festival. In San Antonio, Texas on 13 June 1994, thirteen-year-old Nicholas Barclay disappeared. Three and a half years later, when his family's only hope was to find his remains and gain closure, they received word that Nicholas was alive and had been found in Spain. His elder sister, Carey, flew out to Spain to bring Nicholas home whereupon he unfolded a tale of kidnapping and abuse. However, blonde, blue-eyed American Nicolas had somehow become darker skinned, dark haired and French and now looked out onto the world through brown eyes. Yet the family still accepted him as their own! Told partly through interviews with the players including, incredibly, the imposter himself and dramatized interpretations of events, The Imposter gently reveals the events as private investigator Charlie Parker suspects Frédérick Bourdin's true identity and uncovers his history. It bears some resemblance to Le Retour de Martin Guerre (or Sommersby if you preferred the American adaptation) but there is no sign of altruism or a purity of intent from Bourdin. Just as you think you've understood the situation, another nugget of information widens the eyes even further until 'How could the family not know?' turns to 'Why did they decide not to know?' And still more questions arrive. It's an incredible story where doubt is cast over the sanity and honesty of those at the heart of it. At one point, Nicholas' sister (the real one, not the version played by an actress) says with all sincerity, "Spain? That's, like, across the country!" It is plainly obvious we're not dealing with the brightest sparks. But being educationally challenged does not mean dishonesty is not a factor. Director Bart Layton weaves the tale beautifully, never giving away too much in one go and his use of reconstruction blends perfectly with the genuine interviews. The use of real person and actor for each 'character' so often jars in TV documentaries leaving the viewer confused as to who s/he is watching on the screen. Here, Layton has cast perfectly and the dual appearances compliment each other, blending so it is neither noticeable nor important which version we are watching. Star status is usually reserved for performers in feature films, not factual documentaries, but Bourdin is so relaxed, so matter of fact in the telling of his own version of events that he draws the viewer in and leaves us wanting to climb inside his head an know how his brain turns and how many teeth are missing from each cog. The Imposter, though unlikely to enthuse as wide an audience as last year's Project Nim or Senna, is a bizarre, chilling, surprising and thoroughly enthralling 99-minute eye-opening experience.


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