Jodorowsky's Dune (2013) - News Poster

News

Into The Unknown: curator Patrick Gyger on his new sci-fi exhibition

Ryan Lambie May 31, 2017

A major exhibition at the Barbican explores the history of the sci-fi genre. We catch up with curator Patrick Gyger to tell us more...

Science fiction is now part of the mainstream. No longer confined to the pages of niche pulp magazines or cheap mass-market novels, no longer the preserve of low-budget B-movies, the genre is just about ubiquitous in modern pop culture. From hit films like Interstellar and Guardians Of The Galaxy to such TV shows as Black Mirror and best-selling novels like The Hunger Games, sci-fi has become a vital means of exploring and making sense of the world around us.

See related  John Wick 3 already on the cards John Wick 3: Keanu Reeves confirms his interest

For proof, look no further than Into The Unknown: A Journey Through Science Fiction, a major new exhibition which starts at the Barbican Centre on the 3rd June.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Highlander reboot: director plans a trilogy

Simon Brew Jan 31, 2017

The influence of Star Wars will loom over the Highlander reboot - and a trilogy of movies is planned...

The Highlander sequels, it would not be incorrect to say, didn’t turn out awfully well. In fact, if you’re looking for a top tip from us, if it’s got Highlander in the title and a number afterwards, it’s a film you don’t need to put yourself out to watch.

See related A closer look at Jodorowsky's Dune The fall and rise of Alejandro Jodorowsky's Dune Looking back at David Lynch’s Blue Velvet

Director Chad Stahelski has been promoting the John Wick sequel, and his next job is helming the long-planned Highlander reboot. Turns out, though, he’s looking to break the curse of the Highlander sequels as well.

In a new interview with Collider, he said that “I think the ginal Highlander] TV
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Splinter Cell movie is still on, Tom Hardy on board

Simon Brew Jan 31, 2017

The upcoming Splinter Cell movie is heading for a PG-13 rating – and may even shoot this year…

Since the Assassin’s Creed movie landed in cinemas and failed to ignite the box office quite as 20th Century Fox and UbiSoft had planned, questions have been asked about the other videogame adaptations that UbiSoft had in various stages of development.

See related A closer look at Jodorowsky's Dune The fall and rise of Alejandro Jodorowsky's Dune Looking back at David Lynch’s Blue Velvet

Notwithstanding Assassin’s Creed 2, which is looking like a long shot at the moment, there’s also The Division, that last week landed Stephen Gaghan (Syriana) to direct. And then there’s the Ghost Recon film, that had been announced as having Tom Hardy on board.

Nothing has been heard of the project for a while, but now, thanks to Collider, we have a bit of news.
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Danny Boyle sci-fi short film we never got to see

Ryan Lambie Jan 31, 2017

Shot well over 18 years ago, Danny Boyle's sci-fi short film Alien Love Triangle has never been released - despite a starry cast...

In the late 90s, two very different filmmakers were still in the (relatively) early stages of their careers. Mexican director Guillermo del Toro had released his first feature, Cronos (1993) to widespread acclaim. The UK's Danny Boyle had captured the zeitgeist with his second movie, Trainspotting, and was about to embark on his next film, A Life Less Ordinary (1997).

See related A closer look at Jodorowsky's Dune The fall and rise of Alejandro Jodorowsky's Dune Looking back at David Lynch’s Blue Velvet

Had everything gone to plan, del Toro and Boyle could have wound up directing their own chapters of a three-part anthology movie - the sci-fi equivalent of, say, Amicus Productions' portmanteau horror films of the 60s and 70s, such as The House That Dripped Blood
See full article at Den of Geek »

Pretty Packaging: Jodorowsky's Dune Gets A Spiced French Release

Frank Pavich' documentary Jodorowsky's Dune has a lot of fans in these parts, with our Ryland Aldrich being one of them. Its subject is Jodorowsky's failed quest to create a film based on Frank Herbert's Dune saga, an attempt often considered to be "the greatest film never made". And while you can put some question marks there, pondering the epic that would have been is a fun exercise, one which the documentary fully supports. It's been out on DVD and Blu-ray in several regions already, and this week France added a special edition of their own to the list. What attracted me to it was the inclusion of an art-book, which is always a good thing and Especially with this title. What I didn't expect...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Dune: Legendary acquires the movie and TV rights

Mike Cecchini Nov 22, 2016

Frank Herbert's Dune may be coming back to our screens, as the film and television rights have been picked up by Legendary...

After far too long, someone is taking another crack at Dune, Frank Herbert's classic series of science fiction novels. In this case, that someone is Legendary Entertainment, who are no stranger to genre franchises. There are no real details to report at the moment other than the fact that Legendary has "the film and television motion picture rights" to the Dune saga, but that's big enough news in itself. Paramount previously had the rights and had been attempting to make a new Dune movie since 2008, at one point announcing Deepwater Horizon's Peter Berg as director.

I'd like to focus on one word from the press release that's been sent out: television.

While David Lynch's ambitious and troubled 1984 big screen adaptation has achieved cult status over the years,
See full article at Den of Geek »

'Blade Runner' sequel director would like to adapt Frank Herbert's 'Dune' next

  • Hitfix
'Blade Runner' sequel director would like to adapt Frank Herbert's 'Dune' next
Denis Villeneuve is either trolling sci-fi fans or just really, really ambitious. The Canadian director, who's currently promoting Arrival and in production on the Blade Runner sequel, has just said he'd like to adapt Frank Herbert's Dune. I find myself feeling bad for Villeneuve sometimes (and then I remember he's a well-off director with high-profile gigs). Especially recently when he talked about being rushed off his film Arrival so he could start on Blade Runner. And every time I talk about the movie people get angry. Considering his current work schedule I'm sure none of that negativity is getting to him. Yet. But Ridley Scott's Blade Runner is an untouchable classic to a lot of people and many don't see the point in a sequel at all. Regardless, it's happening and while doing some recent press tours, Villeneuve told Variety he has a great love for sci-fi and revealed
See full article at Hitfix »

Video: The 10 Best Movies Never Made

One thing film fans like to talk about almost as much as movies they love are movies that had fantastic talent attached, but for some reason or another, never ended up making it to the big screen. Documentaries like Jodorowsky's Dune and The Death of Superman Lives: What Happened? have contributed to this conversation recently, and now ScreenRant is trying to keep it going with a video of their 10 Best Movies Never Made.

I'd heard about a handful of these before (Darren Aronofsky's Batman: Year One is common knowledge among Batfans, and the troubles around George Miller's Justice League Mortal were well-documented a few years ago), but there are also some cool details that I'd never heard before. For example, I knew The Beatles wanted to make The Lord of the Rings, but I didn't know about the casting in mind for each of the Fab Four. Check out the video below,
See full article at GeekTyrant »

DVD Review: 'The Dance of Reality'

  • CineVue
★★★★☆ It's been more than two decades since audiences last got to see a new film from visionary Chilean director Alejandro Jodorowsky, with Frank Pavich's documentary on an abandoned sci-fi epic - Jodorowsky's Dune (2013) - looking like being the closet they might get. Now comes The Dance of Reality (2013), an absurdist dreamscape of a biopic that begins with the director himself addressing the camera extolling the the life-giving power of money; presumably by way of an explanation for his twenty-five year absence and its abrupt end. While still a carnival of politics and sex, in keeping with his most famous work, it's significantly more sincere story of myth and memory.

The edges of his provocation have been rounded and wilful obfuscation is less of a hurdle than viewers may have had to leap in the past; though this may not be surprising for a film that purports to tell of his family history.
See full article at CineVue »

Snowfort Pictures Expanding Film Production Team

Snowfort Pictures Expanding Film Production Team
Read More: Meet the 2013 SXSW Filmmakers #3: 'Cheap Thrills' Rejects the American Dream and a 'Big Ass Spider!' Destroys La Snowfort Pictures, an La-based production company founded in 2010 by Travis Stevens, has expanded its team. The company produced SXSW Audience Award winner "Cheap Thrills," along with the acclaimed documentary "Jodorowsky's Dune" and the horror film "Starry Eyes." In order to expand its production capabilities in the future, Snowfort has added Stephanie Trepanier as Director of Development, David Lawson Jr. as Head of Production and Alessando Pulisci as Conventions Coordinator. Trepanier has founded both the Frontières International Co-Production Market of the Fantasia International Film Festival and the consultation company Evokative Films. Lawson has produced award-winning films such as "Spring" and "Resolution." On the expansion and the hopes to grow production...
See full article at Indiewire »

Watch: First 10 Minutes of 'The Death of 'Superman Lives'' As Movie is Released Exclusively Online

Everything I know about Tim Burton's failed 1998 superhero film Superman Lives I've learned from Kevin Smith's great recollection in An Evening with Kevin Smith. Starring Nicolas Cage as the titular protagonist, kooky producer Jon Peters guiding it as long as he could and possibly hosting a giant spider in the third act, this would have been not only a wildly different take on the iconic Man of Steel but vastly eccentric from anything produced in the superhero genre then-or-now. Smith can only give one man's account, though, and like any movie there are more than a handful of people who need to come together to make it happen. To writer/director Jon Schnepp's credit, the filmmaker rounded up as many of those people as he could and successfully made a movie about one that failed to do so entirely. The film in question, The Death of "Superman
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Documentary About George Miller's Abandoned 'Justice League Mortal' In The Works

It would seem there's just as much interest in comic book movies that didn't happen, as the ones that have. Last year the excellent "Jodorowsky's Dune" dropped, this year we've already received “The Death of ‘Superman Lives’: What Happened?” about Tim Burton's failed attempt to bring the Man Of Steel to the big screen, and now, perhaps the granddaddy of aborted superhero flicks is getting the documentary treatment. Director Ryan Unicomb is putting together "Miller's Justice League Mortal," which as the title suggest, will profile George Miller's scrapped "Justice League Mortal." On paper it was certainly promising, with the script bringing together the comic book storylines from “Jla: Tower of Babel,” “Superman: Sacrifice” and “Crisis on Infinite Earth” #8 with a cast that would've seen Armie Hammer as Batman, D.J. Cotrona as Superman, Adam Brody as The Flash and Megan Gale as Wonder Woman. But the budget...
See full article at The Playlist »

George Miller's aborted Justice League movie is getting a tell-all documentary

George Miller's aborted Justice League movie is getting a tell-all documentary
A documentary focusing on George Miller's ill-fated Justice League movie is in the works.

The film - titled Justice League Mortal - was aborted in 2008, and now Australian director Ryan Unicomb is to take a closer look at the scrapped project.

Unicomb said that he has drawn inspiration for Miller's Justice League Mortal from Jon Schnepp's The Death of Superman Lives, which focused on Tim Burton's aborted Superman film, and 2013 documentary Jodorowsky's Dune.

Speaking to Inside Film, Unicomb said: "We wanted to get the story out there to help us gauge interest.

"I have always been fascinated with the project, which would be in the same vein as Jodorowsky's Dune and this year's The Death of Superman Lives: What Happened?."

Miller's Justice League film had been due to star Armie Hammer as Batman, DJ Cotrona as Superman and Megan Gale as Wonder Woman.

Warner Bros confirmed that
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Justice League: documentary coming on film that never was

George Miller's Justice League was one of the comic book movies that never was. A new documentary aims to chart what happened/

Whilst director Zack Snyder will be turning his attention to a pair of Justice League films for DC once he's done and dusted with Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice, another new movie project will be looking back at the Justice League film that never happened.

This was relatively recently too. Mad Max director George Miller had begun casting a Justice League film, and the plan was to shoot the movie in Australia. However, Warner Bros eventually pulled the plug on that particular project back in 2008, in the light of the success of Christopher Nolan's Dark Knight films. A new documentary, from director Ryan Unicomb and producers Aaron Cater and Steven Caldwell, wants to chart the story of what happened with the abandoned Justice League project.
See full article at Den of Geek »

The Death of George Miller’s Justice League Finds Life in a New Documentary

This film follows and was inspired by such docs as Jodorowsky's Dune and the upcoming The Death of "Superman Lives: What Happened?.

"The Death of George Miller’s Justice League Finds Life in a New Documentary" was originally published on Film School Rejects for our wonderful readers to enjoy. It is not intended to be reproduced on other websites. If you aren't reading this in your favorite RSS reader or on Film School Rejects, you're being bamboozled. We hope you'll come find us and enjoy the best articles about movies, television and culture right from the source.
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

"Justice League: Mortal" Doco Planned

Following in the wake of such films as "Jodorowsky's Dune" and "The Death of Superman Lives: What Happened?," a new feature-length documentary is in the works about "Justice League Mortal," the DC Comics adaptation that "Mad Max: Fury Road" helmer George Miller was slated to direct before the project fell apart back in 2008.

Short film director Ryan Unicomb is teaming with producers Aaron Cater and Steven Caldwell and Sydney-based writer/author Maria Lewis to develop the documentary which will reportedly be an unbiased account of the superhero ensemble project's gestation, development and ultimate disintegration.

Currently going by the working title of "Miller's Justice League Mortal," Unicomb is said to already have private investors lined up though he may augment that however with a crowd-funding campaign. The plan is to interview some of the cast and crew who would have been a part of the film along with showcasing some never-before-seen artwork and costumes.
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Jodorowsky: Before, After and Santa Sangre

One of the unlikeliest “comebacks” in recent history was that of Alejandro Jodorowsky, who at age eighty-five last year had two new movies in cinemas: One a documentary in which he was the subject, the other his first feature as writer-director in nearly fifteen years. Frank Pavich’s Jodorowsky's Dune drew on voluminous archival materials to chronicle the Chilean-French surrealist’s failed (yet still influential) attempt to make a mid-1970s film of Frank Herbert’s science-fiction epic, which would have utilized such disparate talents as Salvador Dalí, Pink Floyd, H.R. Giger, Mick Jagger and Orson Welles. The filmmaker’s own The Dance of Reality was an autobiographical phantasmagoria that cast several of his family members. It showed his distinctively outrageous, poetical imagination as vigorous as ever. But a look back at 1989's Santa Sangre... >> - Dennis Harvey
See full article at Fandor: Keyframe »

Jodorowsky: Before, After and Santa Sangre

One of the unlikeliest “comebacks” in recent history was that of Alejandro Jodorowsky, who at age eighty-five last year had two new movies in cinemas: One a documentary in which he was the subject, the other his first feature as writer-director in nearly fifteen years. Frank Pavich’s Jodorowsky's Dune drew on voluminous archival materials to chronicle the Chilean-French surrealist’s failed (yet still influential) attempt to make a mid-1970s film of Frank Herbert’s science-fiction epic, which would have utilized such disparate talents as Salvador Dalí, Pink Floyd, H.R. Giger, Mick Jagger and Orson Welles. The filmmaker’s own The Dance of Reality was an autobiographical phantasmagoria that cast several of his family members. It showed his distinctively outrageous, poetical imagination as vigorous as ever. But a look back at 1989's Santa Sangre... >> - Dennis Harvey
See full article at Keyframe »

Alejandro Jodorowsky Wrote two Episodes of Metal Hulant (Heavy Metal)

Add this to the many things I didn't know: Alejandro Jodorowsky, the director of such surreal masterpieces as El Topo and The Holy Mountain, and the subject of the recent documentary Jodorowsky's Dune wrote two episodes of the Heavy Metal television series, Metal Hurlant Chronicles.

Point? Now I want to see them episodes.

The titles of the episodes are "Loyal Khondor" and "Master of Destiny" and by the looks of the teaser for "Loyal Khondor" below, Jodorowsky is that much closer to making his Dune movie.

Check it out:

Recommended Release: Metal Hurlant Chronicles

[Continued ...]
See full article at QuietEarth »

Watch: Trailer for the Documentary 'The Death of "Superman Lives": What Happenedc'

A favorite subject amongst film nerds is the movies that could have been made but never did. We have had Lost of La Mancha chronicling Terry Gilliam's attempt to make Don Quixote. Just last year, we had Jodorowsky's Dune, about the failed making of Dune by Alejandro Jodorowsky. The Death of "Superman Lives": What Happenedc takes a look at the could-have-been Superman movie from Tim Burton and starring Nicolas Cage, and there's a new trailer for the latter that you can watch below. I don't mind a little bit of "what ifc" dreaming. I do it all the time. What if this filmmaker had made this movie instead of the one that did sort of thing. The thing I do have an issue is when everybody just automatically assumes the movie that could have been made would have been amazing. Quite frankly, everyone talking about Jodorowsky's vision of
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites