7.9/10
18
4 user 13 critic

More Than the Rainbow (2012)

Not Rated | | Documentary | 2012 (USA)
Trailer
1:53 | Trailer
As it chronicles the life and times of street photographer and former cabbie Matt Weber, More Than The Rainbow becomes a vibrant conversation about the photographic medium, artistic ... See full summary »

Director:

Dan Wechsler
1 nomination. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview:
Matt Weber ... Himself
Dave Beckerman Dave Beckerman ... Himself
Boogie Boogie ... Himself
Ralph Gibson Ralph Gibson ... Himself
Eric Kroll Eric Kroll ... Himself
Zoe Strauss Zoe Strauss ... Herself
Jeff Mermelstein Jeff Mermelstein ... Himself
Jeffrey Ladd Jeffrey Ladd ... Himself
Julio Mitchell Julio Mitchell ... Himself
Todd Oldham ... Himself
Ben Lifson Ben Lifson ... Himself
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Storyline

As it chronicles the life and times of street photographer and former cabbie Matt Weber, More Than The Rainbow becomes a vibrant conversation about the photographic medium, artistic expression and NYC. Set to wonderful jazz and drenched in evocative images, the film is bittersweet and nostalgic from beginning to end. Written by More Than the Rainbow

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Certificate:

Not Rated
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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

2012 (USA) See more »

Filming Locations:

New York City, New York, USA

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$1,082, 4 May 2014, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$1,082, 4 May 2014
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Lespedi Productions See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color
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User Reviews

 
"Finding Vivian Meier" meets "Taxi Driver"
28 January 2015 | by paul-allaerSee all my reviews

"More Than the Rainbow" (2012 release; 82 min.) is a documentary about street photography in New York, and in particular chronicles Matt Weber. As the documentary opens, we are right away introduced to Matt Weber. I assume he is well known in the photographers' circles but I admit I had never heard of him. We get to know Matt and he brings his story of how he started taking pictures more than 30 years ago when he was a taxi driver in New York and he's literally shoot pictures from within his cab. Nowadays he's no longer driving a cab and has the good fortune of taking pictures on a full-time basis. Along the way we are introduced to others in New York, including other street photographers, who comment on what they think of Matt's work. And of course the documentary includes tons of pictures shot by Matt (and others).

Couple of further comments: first, I can't remember where I read about this documentary recently, but it came highly recommended, and so I sought it out at my local library here in Cincinnati. So glad I did. There is no "story line" as such in this documentary (unlike in, say, the similarly-themed "Finding Vivian Meier" recent documentary), but it doesn't affect the viewing experience negatively, as long as you have an interest in photography (and New York, I suppose). Second, Matt makes some astute observations about life as a photographer, let alone a street photographer. Comments Matt: "it's a pretty obscure profession. If people are asked to name a photographer, Ansel Adams is often the only name people know." Comments another photographer: "the camera saved me from a boring life", ha! Third, the overall feel and mood of the documentary in certain parts of this documentary seemingly comes straight out of "Taxi Driver" (Martin Scorsese's 1976 pic): the setting, the music , etc. Amazing. This leads me to my last, but certainly not least, comment: the music that is featured in this documentary is nothing short of stellar and spectacular, holy cow. The jazzy-sounding score plays virtually non-stop the entire movie, and much of it is courtesy none other than Thelonius Monk (with tracks like Locomotive, We See, Green Chimneys, Ugly Beauty, Ask me Now, and on and on), and the rest of the music is from Keith Gurland. How in the world were the documentary makers able to get the permission to use all of this Monk music? (Maybe that also explains why there is unfortunately no soundtrack available for purchase, be it digitally, or on CD, vinyl or any other medium.)

Bottom line: if you like documentaries and havean interest in art in general or photography in particular, I'd readily recommend you check out "More Than the Rainbow", you will not be disappointed. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!


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