Wrong (2012) - News Poster

(I) (2012)

News

Cannes 2018 Wish List: 37 Movies We Hope Make the Cut, From Barry Jenkins to Claire Denis

  • Indiewire
Cannes 2018 Wish List: 37 Movies We Hope Make the Cut, From Barry Jenkins to Claire Denis
The Cannes Film Festival is always a major turning point for the year in cinema. While Sundance kicks off the calendar with an overview of new American movies, Cannes casts a much wider net, digging through an international set of possibilities that includes its usual stable of reliable auteurs in addition to some rising stars. Unlike most high-profile festivals, the Cannes selection is fairly small, with most attention being paid to the roughly 20 features that crack the Official Competition. Artistic director Thierry Fremaux and his mysterious programming team tend to wait until the last second before securing titles, which means it’s a bit of a crapshoot to pontificate about which movies will actually score a spot at the festival.

Until April 12, the full program is anybody’s guess, but a few possibilities can be eliminated from the outset. Richard Linklater’s Amazon-produced Cate Blanchett vehicle “Where’d You
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Bitch’ Review: Marianna Palka’s Vicious Feminist Satire Has Plenty of Bark and Bite — Sundance 2017

‘Bitch’ Review: Marianna Palka’s Vicious Feminist Satire Has Plenty of Bark and Bite — Sundance 2017
There are plenty of stories about domestic housewives who grow tired of their oppressive routines, but none quite like Marianna Palka’s vicious feminist satire “Bitch,” in which the writer-director-star plays a woman who takes on the identity of a wild dog. It’s a blunt metaphor, but Palka transforms an absurd premise into a chilling look at the destruction of the nuclear family with a vivid, snarling vision driven by the propulsive energy of its biting critique.

Inspired by a real-life case study documented by psychologist R.D. Lang, “Bitch” follows the plight of afflicted matriarch Jill (Palka) and her clueless husband Bill (Palka regular Jason Ritter). The usually sweet-natured Ritter boldly plays against type, initially coming across as an “American Psycho”-like creep who sleeps with his secretary and buries himself in the office, leaving the care of his three young children to his clearly unstable wife. When she snaps,
See full article at Indiewire »

Horror Highlights: The Crooked Man, Night Of The Living Dead: Genesis, Stalkher, Blanc/Biehn Productions, XLrator Media & Blue Fox Entertainment

  • DailyDead
Excited for the Halloween season yet? Syfy's 31 Days of Halloween kicks off this Friday and will feature The Crooked Man, starring Michael Jai White (The Dark Knight, Spawn). Also in today's Horror Highlights: trailers for both Night of the Living Dead: Genesis and StalkHer, festival screening details for films from Blanc/Biehn Productions, and details on a distribution agreement between XLrator Media and Blue Fox Entertainment.

The Crooked Man Airing on Syfy's 31 Days of Horror: "The Crooked Man, starring Michael Jai White (Spawn), Amber Benson (“Buffy the Vampire Slayer”) and Dina Meyer (Starship Troopers) kicks off Syfy's 31 Days of Halloween [on Saturday, October 1st at 9:00 p.m. Et.]

Synopsis: While at a slumber party, twelve year old ‘Olivia’ is blamed for the horrific and mysterious death of her friend after singing a song, created by a reclusive mastermind, ‘Milo’ (Michael Jai White), which summons a demonic figure known as "The Crooked Man". Returning to her hometown six years later,
See full article at DailyDead »

[Tiff Review] We Are Never Alone

Fans of Quentin Dupieux should rejoice because I haven’t seen a film this absurdly hilarious since Wrong. Petr Václav‘s We Are Never Alone is definitely bleaker, darker, and strangely realist, but it has that same sense of subtle humor to give you pause about the meaning of what’s thus far been viewed. The story concerns two families with certifiably insane patriarchs, a local pimp searching for escape, and the whore he deludes himself into thinking loves him despite her pining over the father of her daughter in jail. They each have their own personal problems that should be uniquely particular to their individual psychological imperfections and yet when they converge they’re insanely revealed to be kindred spirits spinning around atop this cesspool we call Earth.

Václav includes political commentary about the current state of affairs in Czech Republic (don’t tell Miroslav Hanus‘ prison guard he’s a communist,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Film Guide: What Movie Should I Watch This Weekend? (June 24, 2016)

Film Guide: What Movie Should I Watch This Weekend? (June 24, 2016)
To help sift through the increasing number of new releases (independent or otherwise), the Weekly Film Guide is here! Below you’ll find basic plot, personnel and cinema information for all of this week’s fresh offerings.

Starting this month, we’ve also put together a list for the entire month. We’ve included this week’s list here, complete with information on screening locations for films in limited release.

See More: Here Are All the Upcoming Movies in Theaters for June 2016

Here are the films opening theatrically in the U.S. the week of Friday, June 24. All synopses provided by distributor unless listed otherwise.

Wide

Free State of Jones

Director: Gary Ross

Cast: Matthew McConaughey, Keri Russell, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Mahershala Ali, Jacob Lofland

Synopsis: “In Jones County, Miss., Newt Knight joins forces with other farmers and a group of slaves to lead a rebellion against the Confederacy.”

Independence Day: Resurgence
See full article at Indiewire »

Daniel Radcliffe & Paul Dano Have A Surreal Fight For Survival In ‘Swiss Army Man’ [Review]

Daniel Radcliffe is a dead body that gives life in the infinitely strange and terminally unsatisfying “Swiss Army Man.” The feature directorial debut from inventive and successful music video directors the Daniels (real names: Dan Kwan and Daniel Scheinert) teams Radcliffe with Paul Dano. It edges into the non-sequitur weirdness of Quentin Dupieux (“Rubber,” “Wrong“) […]

The post Daniel Radcliffe & Paul Dano Have A Surreal Fight For Survival In ‘Swiss Army Man’ [Review] appeared first on The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Sundance Review: 'Swiss Army Man' Starring Paul Dano, Daniel Radcliffe & Mary Elizabeth Winstead

Daniel Radcliffe is a dead body that gives life in the infinitely strange and terminally unsatisfying "Swiss Army Man." The feature directorial debut from inventive and successful music video directors the Daniels (real names: Dan Kwan and Daniel Scheinert) teams Radcliffe with Paul Dano. It edges into the non-sequitur weirdness of Quentin Dupieux ("Rubber," "Wrong") and the fantastical romantic yearning of Michel Gondry ("Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind") but doesn't persuasively mint a uniquely "Daniels" brand of oddity. "Swiss Army Man" is a big swing — there's no denying the risk in putting two well-known actors in a film where one plays a barely-mobile corpse — but also a big whiff that rarely connects its characters and situations to humor or empathy. Read More: Sundance Exclusive: Photos Of 'Swiss Army Man' Starring Paul Dano, Daniel Radcliffe, And Mary Elizabeth Winstead Dano...
See full article at The Playlist »

Full AFI Festival Lineup And Schedule Unveiled

The American Film Institute announced today the films that will screen in the World Cinema, Breakthrough, Midnight, Shorts and Cinema’s Legacy programs at AFI Fest 2015 presented by Audi.

AFI Fest will take place November 5 – 12, 2015, in the heart of Hollywood. Screenings, Galas and events will be held at the historic Tcl Chinese Theatre, the Tcl Chinese 6 Theatres, Dolby Theatre, the Lloyd E. Rigler Theatre at the Egyptian, the El Capitan Theatre and The Hollywood Roosevelt.

World Cinema showcases the most acclaimed international films of the year; Breakthrough highlights true discoveries of the programming process; Midnight selections will grip audiences with terror; and Cinema’s Legacy highlights classic movies and films about cinema. World Cinema and Breakthrough selections are among the films eligible for Audience Awards. Shorts selections are eligible for the Grand Jury Prize, which qualifies the winner for Academy Award®consideration. This year’s Shorts jury features filmmaker Janicza Bravo,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

25 great directors working outside mainstream cinema

Meet some of the best directors working today, who haven't gone down the blockbuster movie route...

Ever find it a bit lame when the same big name directors get kicked around for every high profile project? Christopher Nolan, Jj Abrams, maybe the Russo Brothers? With so much focus on blockbuster films these days, getting a major franchise job seems like the main acknowledgement of success for a filmmaker. And yes, both the financial and creative rewards can be great. But there are plenty of other directors out there, doing their own thing, from art house auteurs to Dtv action specialists.

Here are 25 examples.

Lee Hardcastle

Even if you don’t know his name, you’ve probably seen Lee Hardcastle’s ultraviolent claymations shared on social media. He first started getting noticed for his two-minute remake of The Thing, starring the famous stop motion penguin Pingu. Far from just a cheap one-joke mash-up,
See full article at Den of Geek »

William Fichtner Also Cast in Emmerich's 'Independence Day' Sequel

The cast for this big sequel continues to grow, with yet another intriguing name. Deadline reports that actor William Fichtner is joining Roland Emmerich's Independence Day 2 as a "top general". Apparently Fichtner's role as a general will get "even larger in the two films that will follow." Very interesting. Fichtner has appeared in a variety of films recently, including The Homesman, Elysium, The Lone Ranger, Phantom, Wrong, Drive Angry and The Dark Knight of course. He's always great to see in a movie, and I'm curious why his role will expand as it goes on. Does something happen to him or is he just a survivor? This also indicates that Fox is really pushing forward with a new trilogy of Independence Day movies coming up. As for returning cast members – Jeff Goldblum, Vivica A. Fox, Brent Spiner and recently confirmed Bill Pullman and Judd Hirsch will all be back
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Review: Reality

When Quentin Dupieux arrived on the scene with his surreal (and Very weird)”slasher tire” film, Rubber, it was instantly apparent that this was a filmmaker who had absolutely no intention in making a point A to point B kind of film. It was a breath of fresh air, and his following films, Wrong, Wrong Cops both full explored that marriage of humor, satire and an imagination that feels almost like it was straight from the mind of a child. Continuing that approach once again, in in the most effective way to date, Dupieux’s Reality (which opened in NY/VOD on May 1st and here in La on May 15th via IFC Films) is quite easily Dupieux’s most accomplished piece of work to date, a laugh out loud surrealist comedy filled to the brim with wit and intelligence.

A series of scenes involving characters that seemingly have nothing
See full article at Icons of Fright »

Watch: Quentin Dupieux Narrates a Meta-Movie Moment From His Brain-Bending 'Reality' (Video)

Watch: Quentin Dupieux Narrates a Meta-Movie Moment From His Brain-Bending 'Reality' (Video)
"Reality" unfolds as a tapestry of very strange story strands that casually intersect and bleed into each other. They're hard to parse, which makes Quentin Dupieux's latest oddity a uniquely playful kind of moviegoing experience, much like his earlier cult comedies "Rubber" (2010) and "Wrong" (2012). It goes something like this: A precocious little girl named Reality (Kyla Kenedy) finds a videotape inside the guts of a hog her father has slaughtered; a cooking show host (Jon Heder of "Napoleon Dynamite") dressed in a giant rat suit has a form of eczema only he can see; French camera-operator Jason (Alain Chabat) wants to make a film about murderous television sets; and Reality's school principal (Eric Wareheim) is plagued by dreams of cross-dressing. Are these episodic flights of fantasy reality, or wish-fulfillment? Though shot around Los Angeles, where Dupieux is now based, the film exists somewhere outside time and place, similar to.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Review: Quentin Dupieux's Reality, Not Just Another Headscratcher

French DJ-cum-filmmaker Quentin Dupieux, aka Mr.Oizo, invaded the cinema landscape rather abruptly through his Dadaistic effort Rubber, following a killing tire in a twisted slasher formula. The comic element aside, Dupieux knew what he was up to since the first minute, not only in the opening scene of Rubber, featuring its unforgettable manifesto "No Reason," but also in his films to come. (He had previously tried his hand at filmmaking in the unfinished Nonfilm and the adequately bizarre comedy Steak.)Rubber marked a new chapter in the filmmaker´s career building his own topsy-turvy world. Wrong demonstrated his potential, not only through the absolutely ridiculous story of a dog-obsessed protagonist but mostly through the stylistic and formal solutions that blended into Dupieux´s personally-bred brand of poetics. The expansion...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Reality Review

French filmmaker Quentin Dupieux has made a career out of blurring the lines between ambition and utter lunacy, vouching for those who argue that beauty and chaos go hand-in-hand. I’ll confess that Rubber and Wrong hold a special place in my heart, but his latest film, aptly titled Reality, might be where I hop off this gonzo train of absurd, nonconforming, dreamlike voyeurism. As you can assume, Dupieux’s hazily overexposed interpretation of reality is anything but “normal,” as we’re once again caught in multiple character arcs that are pieced together by – well, I can finally say I have no ‘effing idea how everything comes together. Rubber addresses cinematic cultures, and Wrong chases a dog, but Reality introduces a nightmare that we never wake up from no matter how hard we try.

There’s no point in explaining a plot that’s non-existent, but here’s the short-hand version.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Reality (Réalité) | Review

Quentin Dupieux's Reality is the stream of consciousness of a mad cinematic scientist, intertwining the perspectives of Jason (Alain Chabat), Reality (Kyla Kenedy), Zog (John Glover), and Henri (Eric Wareheim) to the point of sheer mindfuckery. While keeping with the absurdist tendencies of Rubber and Wrong, Reality is heavily dosed with the meandering dream logic of surrealism. Showcased in a brilliant menagerie of dreams, films-within-films and presumed realities, Reality abides by Dupieux's mantra of "no reason" as it fluidly contorts into a rat's nest of narrative threads, simultaneously unfolding and folding within itself like a M. C. Escher illustration.
See full article at SmellsLikeScreenSpirit »

Review: Quentin Dupieux's 'Reality' Is A Mind-Itch Worth Scratching

If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. And if it is broke, no harm in breaking it further. After the modest, cultier-than-thou successes of killer tire movie “Rubber” and lost dog odyssey “Wrong,” perpetual student filmmaker Quentin Dupieux returns with another iteration of his very narrowly defined field of expertise with “Reality” (you probably guessed that is a mildly ironic title). Surprisingly though, while he’s ploughing the same old furrow of deadpan sight gags with the color grade set to "stonewash" and disjointed moments of droll absurdity, “Reality,” if you're in the right frame of mind, is actually pretty good fun, thanks to a clutch of enjoyable performances and a healthy dose of not taking itself even remotely seriously. In the film's puzzle-box structure, justified by essentially being set in a network of dreams and movies (and dreams-within-dreams and movies-within-dreams-within-movies), very occasionally Dupieux puts together something that adds up to slightly more.
See full article at The Playlist »

Rotterdam 2015: Reality, Not Just Another Headscratcher By Dupieux

French DJ-cum-filmmaker Quentin Dupieux, aka Mr.Oizo, invaded the cinema landscape rather abruptly through his Dadaistic effort Rubber, following a killing tire in a twisted slasher formula. The comic element aside, Dupieux knew what he was up to since the first minute, not only in the opening scene of Rubber, featuring its unforgettable manifesto "No Reason," but also in his films to come. (He had previously tried his hand at filmmaking in the unfinished Nonfilm and the adequately bizarre comedy Steak.)Rubber marked a new chapter in the filmmaker´s career building his own topsy-turvy world. Wrong demonstrated his potential, not only through the absolutely ridiculous story of a dog-obsessed protagonist but mostly through the stylistic and formal solutions that blended into Dupieux´s personally-bred brand of poetics. The expansion...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Watch The International Trailer For Rubber Director's Realite!

Whether you love him or hate him there's no arguing the fact that there's simply nobody else quite like Rubber and Wrong director Quentin Dupieux these days. The musician turned director has been baffling and / or delighting audiences around the globe with his drily absurd sense of humor for a good few years now and he did the same at the Venice film festival this past year when he premiered his latest effort, Realite.Boasting an international cast that includes Alain Chabat, Eric Wareheim and Napoleon Dynamite's Jon Heder. As usual for Dupieux this one resists meaningful synopsis - plot points really aren't the point of a Dupieux film - but here's how Venice described it:Jason, a quiet cameraman, dreams of directing his first horror...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Watch: First International Trailer For Quentin Dupieux's Oddball 'Reality'

There's the world of movies, then there's the world of movies as seen through the eyes of Quentin Dupieux. His films have concerned killer tires ("Rubber"), missing dogs ("Wrong"), and bad cops ("Wrong Cops"), and as you might've guessed, they're far from grounded. Odd, unique, and distinctly his own, you either let Dupieux take you by the hand, or get left far behind. And that goes for his latest "Reality," which is coming off the 2014 festival circuit and into cinemas in France, and the first international trailer has arrived. Featuring an unlikely cast that includes notable French thesp Alain Chabat, American comedy weirdo Eric Wareheim, and Napolean Dynamite himself Jon Heder, the story follows a cameraman who is given the chance to direct his first horror movie, thanks to the kindness of a wealthy producer. The catch? He has 48 hours to find the perfect scream. Welcome to the world of Quentin Dupieux.
See full article at The Playlist »

The Stack: Canfield Talks Space Station 76, Animated Rick And Morty, Vintage William Castle, And More

Welcome back to The Stack. This is the final episode before I kick off our Holiday Gift Guide this Tuesday November 25. This is also the beginning of a new, shorter format. But The Stack is still packed with home entertainment goodness. A favorite release is Space Station 76 (2014), directed by Jack Plotnick, whom you might remember from Rubber (2010) and Wrong (2012). Olive Films releases Fedora (1978), which many consider to be Billy Wilder's late career followup to Sunset Boulevard (1950). I also take a look at one of their back catalog titles, the nearly forgotten William Castle science fiction spy thriller Project X (1968). Lastly and quite excitedly, I tease the gift guide coverage by revealing one of this year's great TV Blu-ray box...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites