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Page One: Inside the New York Times (2011)

Trailer
2:33 | Trailer
Unprecedented access to the New York Times newsroom yields a complex view of the transformation of a media landscape fraught with both peril and opportunity.

Director:

Andrew Rossi
3 wins & 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Sarah Ellison Sarah Ellison ... Self
Larry Ingrassia Larry Ingrassia ... Self
David Carr ... Self
Dennis Crowley Dennis Crowley ... Self
Bruce Headlam Bruce Headlam ... Self
Evan Williams Evan Williams ... Self
Richard Perez-Pena Richard Perez-Pena ... Self
Paul Steiger Paul Steiger ... Self
Clay Shirky Clay Shirky ... Self
Markos Moulitsas Markos Moulitsas ... Self
Brian Stelter ... Self
Seth Mnookin Seth Mnookin ... Self
Alex S. Jones Alex S. Jones ... Self
Nicholas Lemann ... Self
Ian Fisher Ian Fisher ... Self
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Storyline

During the most tumultuous time for media in generations, filmmaker Andrew Rossi gains unprecedented access to the newsroom at The New York Times. For a year, he follows journalists on the paper's Media Desk, a department created to cover the transformation of the media industry. Through this prism, a complex view emerges of a media landscape fraught with both peril and opportunity, especially at the Times itself. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

This year, the biggest story is their own.

Genres:

Documentary

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language including some sexual references | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Quotes

Man being Interviewed: Journalism is a tool
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Connections

Featured in Ebert Presents: At the Movies: Episode #1.22 (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

Lost in Detroit
Written and performed by Rolfe Kent
From the motion picture Up in the Air (2009)
Courtesy of Paramount Pictures
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User Reviews

 
Decent Documentary Focuses Too Much on Jaded Journalist
28 May 2011 | by chaz-28See all my reviews

Page One: Inside the New York Times is not a documentary about a day in the life of a newspaper. Instead, it is more social commentary from the New York Times' media desk about the current state of newspapers, their antagonizing relationship with news aggregators and social media, and a bit forlorn about how robust the New York Times used to be compared to their current staffing levels based on the combined loss of ad revenue and print subscriptions. The majority of this film focuses on the paper's media section, specifically on the cantankerous journalist David Carr, a former crack addict now social media watchdog. He frequently goes to conferences and events to defend his newspaper against social media sites who proclaim the death of news print and the inevitable rise of the internet news leviathan. Unfortunately for them, David Carr fights backs with some old common sense. In the most effective scene, he holds up a hardcopy of Newser's front page showing all of the news aggregated links on it. His next exhibit has all of the links cut out of it which were 'stolen' from the mainstream media making the Newser's front page look absolutely ridiculous and full of holes for all to see.

Too bad for the film's audience though, David Carr comes across as more of an a**hole for most of the film and you welcome to other locales and issues the documentary focuses on when it's not on Carr. There are scenes of employee layoffs, contrite apologies about Judith Miller and Jayson Blair, and the continuing defense that without the large, networked mainstream media, these new social media / news aggregator sites would have nothing to link to on their websites. These professional at-home bloggers do not have bureaus in Baghdad, stringers in war zones, and in an amusing side bit, they do not have people following their hometown zoning boards either.

Page One is effective at showing the audience that hardcopy newspapers are not dead yet and they still provide a considerable service to those who wish to remain informed. Regrettably, the film spends way too much time on David Carr and the media section which bogs down the film and makes the audience wait for the next segment not involving Carr.


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Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook | Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

29 September 2011 (Denmark) See more »

Also Known As:

Untitled New York Times Project See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$28,911, 19 June 2011

Gross USA:

$1,067,028

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$1,077,982
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color
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