An in-depth look at legendary punk band The Stooges.

Director:

Jim Jarmusch

Writer:

Jim Jarmusch
1 win & 4 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Iggy Pop ... Self (as Jim Osterberg)
Jim Jarmusch ... Self (voice)
Bob Waller Bob Waller ... Self (archive footage)
The Stooges ... Themselves (archive footage)
James Williamson ... Self
Steve Mackay Steve Mackay ... Self
Scott Asheton ... Self
Kathy Asheton Kathy Asheton ... Self
Ron Asheton ... Self (archive footage)
Harry Partch Harry Partch ... Self (archive footage)
MC5 MC5 ... Themselves (archive footage)
John Sinclair John Sinclair ... Self (archive footage)
Danny Fields ... Self
Nico ... Self (archive footage)
Mike Watt Mike Watt ... Self
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Storyline

An in-depth look at legendary punk band The Stooges.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Long live The Stooges See more »

Genres:

Documentary | Music

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for drug content and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The Stooges is one of celebrity chef Anthony Bourdains favorite bands. See more »

Connections

References Midnight Cowboy (1969) See more »

Soundtracks

1969
Written by Iggy Pop (James Osterberg Jr.), Ron Asheton (as Ronald Asheton), Scott Asheton, David Alexander
Performed by The Stooges
Courtesy of Elektra Entertainment Group
By arrangement with Warner Music Group Film & TV Licensing
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User Reviews

 
They had me at Jim Jarmusch. Even more at Iggy Pop. The Stooges to boot? Holy moley.
5 November 2016 | by Quinoa1984See all my reviews

Having read (re-read actually) 'Please Kill Me", and having read a lot about Iggy Pop and the Stooges over the years, I didn't expect I'd maybe learn too much about them from this doc. Little did I know not only I would, but that I would be laughing much of the way (the story where Ron Asheton asks Moe Howard's permission to use the name 'Stoooges' kills, but not as much as Iggy's dead serious response when he is told he *willl* play Peter Pan on Broadway by David Bowie's seemingly scummy manager).

It's also at times dark, at times harrowing, and the most welcome thing to me is how Jarmusch starts with the Stooges at their (first) end in 1973, when they were broke, Iggy was missing gigs and often showing up so wasted on heroin he could "sometimes sing, sometimes not", and it changes up how we usually see these kind of rock documentaries. It often will start with the adulatory remarks. Here, Iggy Pop in the 1973 footage looks like he's about ready to puke all over himself... while stage diving... while probably slathering himself with some substance of unknown origin... maybe genitals out too, who knows(!)

This was an entirely fearless band, and they created art simply by virtue of only doing what *they* liked. F*** popular taste. Hell, if one follows Pop by his word (and how can you not?) there were many, many manufactured acts (Including CSNY? please not them) and that if nothing else the Stooges acted as a counterpoint to so much of what was going on in the late 60's and early 70's while being one of the hardest bands of the era. Jarmusch does an excellent job of showing us through Pop, the late Scott Asheton and other interviews, plus plenty of stock footage and, not unlike Julien Temple with Filth & the Fury, clips from old shows, movies and other rock acts (Soupy Sayles being one of them of course) that make joke of what we're seeing, or at least reference.

Even as someone who thought he knew the Stooges, or at least Iggy Pop (real name Jim Osterberg), this gives as full a picture as you can get while, at the very end, showing us just how massive an influence they had. Think about it: they couldn't play (at first anyway, they got better as they went), and yet they changed things simply by the force of what rock and roll could do and has done when it's at its most pure. The film reflects the aggression, the commitment to absurdity, and Pop's own madness in performance, which was an act depending on the night (or it was all of a piece).

FUN! And I never thought I'd see (or think about) the day when a Jim Jarmusch movie had animated sequences. Bonus!


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

5 August 2016 (Norway) See more »

Also Known As:

Gimme Danger See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$44,725, 30 October 2016

Gross USA:

$440,627

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$950,040
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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