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Hannah Arendt (2012)

Not Rated | | Biography, Drama | 10 January 2013 (Germany)
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A look at the life of philosopher and political theorist Hannah Arendt, who reported for The New Yorker on the war crimes trial of the Nazi Adolf Eichmann.

Writers:

Pamela Katz (screenplay) (as Pam Katz), Margarethe von Trotta (screenplay)
5 wins & 17 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Barbara Sukowa ... Hannah Arendt
Janet McTeer ... Mary McCarthy
Julia Jentsch ... Lotte Köhler
Axel Milberg ... Heinrich Blücher
Timothy Lone Timothy Lone ... News Speaker
Megan Gay ... Francis Wells
Nicholas Woodeson ... William Shawn
Tom Leick ... Jonathan Schell
Ulrich Noethen ... Hans Jonas
Nilton Martins ... Student Enrico
Leila Schaus ... Student Laureen
Harvey Friedman ... Thomas Miller
Victoria Trauttmansdorff Victoria Trauttmansdorff ... Charlotte Beradt
Sascha Ley Sascha Ley ... Lore Jonas
Friederike Becht Friederike Becht ... Young Hannah Arendt
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Storyline

In 1961, the noted German-American philosopher, Hannah Arendt, gets to report on the trial of the notorious Nazi war criminal, Adolf Eichmann. While observing the legal proceedings, the Holocaust survivor concludes that Eichmann was not a simple monster, but an ordinary man who had thoughtlessly buried his conscience through his obedience to the Nazi regime and its ideology. Arendt's expansion of this idea, presented in the articles for "New Yorker", would create the concept of "the banality of evil" that she thought even sucked in some Jewish leaders of the era into unwittingly participating in the Holocaust. The result is a bitter public controversy in which Arendt is accused of blaming the Holocaust's victims. Now that strong willed intellectual is forced to defend her daringly innovative ideas about moral complexity in a struggle that will exact a heavy personal cost. Written by Kenneth Chisholm (kchishol@rogers.com)

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Genres:

Biography | Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

Official site [Japan]

Country:

Germany | Luxembourg | France | Israel

Language:

German | English | French | Hebrew | Latin

Release Date:

10 January 2013 (Germany) See more »

Also Known As:

Hana Arent See more »

Filming Locations:

Israel See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$31,270, 2 June 2013, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$714,442, 3 November 2013
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital
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Did You Know?

Goofs

Throughout the movie, the interior settings reveal that the movie was filmed in Germany and not in New York. Arendt's kitchen contains some vintage German-style appliances, not exclusively vintage American ones. The university lecture hall where Arendt defends herself has a German style of interior architecture, not an American one. The faculty dining hall is also designed and decorated in a German or European style, not an American one as one would have expected at an American university in 1963. See more »

Quotes

Hannah Arendt: The manifestation of the wind of thought is not knowledge, but the ability to tell right from wrong, beautiful from ugly. And I hope that thinking gives people the strength to prevent catastrophes in these rare moments when the chips are down.
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Connections

Featured in Democracy Now!: Episode dated 26 November 2013 (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

Sherry Lane
Composed and Produced by Frank Stumvoll
Courtesy of Freshart Musicproductions
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User Reviews

 
Interesting history lesson
6 May 2013 | by rubenmSee all my reviews

I didn't know an awful lot about philosopher Hannah Arendt before I saw this movie. Now I know a lot more about her, and about the way she thinks. After seeing the film, I have even read some articles about her work.

If that's what director Margarethe von Trotta had in mind when making this film, she succeeded. Her film documents an important chapter in the story of Arendt's life: her articles about the Eichmann trial in Jerusalem, and the ensuing tsunami of negative reactions. The reason for those negative reactions was the way Arendt regarded Eichmann: not as a monster, but as a man 'incapable of thinking', a dimwit who just followed orders. This fitted her theory of 'the banality of evil': the worst kinds of evil are often the result of not thinking for oneself.

Veteran actress Barbara Sukowa portrays Arendt as a difficult and complex woman, who is a brilliant philosopher but also stubborn, arrogant and single-minded. In one scene, we see her lying on a couch, when the phone rings. On the other end of the line is her editor, who faces a deadline and asks if she is making progress with the articles. 'Of course I'm working hard, and it would be nice if I could continue working instead of chatting on the phone', she answers. After that, she returns to the couch, lies down and continues smoking her cigarette.

Sometimes it seems that Arendt is incapable of feeling, just as Eichmann is incapable of thinking. Even when her best friends turn away from her, she continues insulting them by telling them 'she doesn't love the Jewish people'. She means it in a philosophical way - you can't love a people the way you love individuals. But nevertheless, it comes across as cold-hearted and insensitive.

Arendt is clearly an interesting person. But that doesn't make 'Hannah Arendt' an interesting film. From a cinematographic point of view, the movie doesn't have much to offer. It's a rather straightforward account of this episode in Arendt's life. The only thing that adds a little depth to the film are the flashbacks of the romantic affair she had with her teacher, the famous philosopher Martin Heidegger, who sympathized with the Nazis. The film suggests that this affair influenced the way she regarded Nazis such as Eichmann, but doesn't make this explicit. In my view, the film is interesting as a history lesson about this remarkable woman, but not as a great cinematographic experience.


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