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(2015)

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Lgbtq Audiences See Themselves More Onscreen but Financing Can Be Tricky

  • Variety
Lgbtq Audiences See Themselves More Onscreen but Financing Can Be Tricky
Recently, after seeing “Love, Simon,” filmmaker Xavier Dolan wrote on his Instagram page, “Let’s not discuss the movie itself, but rather focus on its existence, and the fact a major studio has released a film on a teen coming out. A door has opened, which has opened before, but this time, I can see the light pouring in.” He praised the film for being a huge step towards building narratives around Lgbtq protagonists instead of relinquishing them to comical supporting roles. When “Call Me by Your Name” was shown to festivalgoers at Sundance, the film immediately picked up momentum, building on its initial buzz to receive several Academy Award nominations, including best picture. It was a coming-of-age love story, which happened to have two male leads.

At this year’s Cannes Film Festival, Wanuri Kahiu’s lesbian love story, “Rafiki” (pictured) premiered in Un Certain Regard to strong reviews.
See full article at Variety »

Hot Docs 2018 Women Directors: Meet Cynthia Wade and Sasha Friedlander — “Grit”

“Grit”

Cynthia Wade’s 2008 documentary “Freeheld” won an Academy Award, Special Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, and 13 other awards. Her other credits include “Grist for the Mill,” “Shelter Dogs,” and “Generation Startup.”

Sasha Friedlander’s feature-length documentary “Where Heaven Meets Hell” won Best Feature Documentary Film at the La Asian Pacific Film Festival and Hawaii International Film Festival. The film aired on PBS.

“Grit” will premiere at the 2018 Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Film Festival on April 30.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

CW&Sf: When Dian was six, a tsunami of mud barreled towards her. Sixteen villages were instantly plunged under 60 feet of mud. The cause? A drilling company struck an underground pocket of mud and unleashed an unstoppable mudflow — a giant, sprawling disaster in Indonesia that continues over a decade later.

“Grit” chronicles Dian’s emerging activism as she
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Gabriel Luna, Diego Boneta, Natalia Reyes Tapped for Sixth ‘Terminator’

  • Variety
Gabriel Luna, Diego Boneta, Natalia Reyes Tapped for Sixth ‘Terminator’
Gabriel Luna, Diego Boneta and Natalia Reyes will join Skydance Media’s upcoming Terminator movie opposite Arnold Schwarzengger and Linda Hamilton.

Deadpool” director Tim Miller is attached with James Cameron and David Ellison producing. Specific details on the characters are being kept under wraps but the movie will be a direct sequel to Cameron’s 1991 film “Terminator 2: Judgment Day,” with Schwarzenegger and Hamilton anchoring the story.

The untitled film will open Nov. 22, 2019, and be distributed domestically by Paramount Pictures and internationally by Fox.

Luna starred as Robbie Reyes/Ghost Rider on the ABC action superhero series “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.,” as well as the El Rey Network drama series “Matador” and the ABC crime drama series “Wicked City.” He also starred in the films “Freeheld” and “Transpecos.”

Boneta made his feature debut in the musical “Rock of Ages.” He currently stars in “The Titan,
See full article at Variety »

Gabriel Luna Is the New ‘Terminator’: Tim Miller and James Cameron Cast Marvel Star in Sequel

Gabriel Luna Is the New ‘Terminator’: Tim Miller and James Cameron Cast Marvel Star in Sequel
The search for the next Terminator is over. Tim Miller and James Cameron have cast Gabriel Luna in the title role of the sixth “Terminator” sequel, Deadline reports. Luna is best known for playing Robbie Reyes/Ghost Rider on the ABC superhero series “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” He also starred in the El Rey Network series “Matador” and the movies “Freeheld” and “Transpecos.”

The untitled “Terminator” sequel is the first to be overseen by Cameron since he directed, wrote, and produced “The Terminator” and “Terminator 2: Judgment Day.” Cameron selected “Deadpool” director Miller to helm the new installment, which will see original stars Arnold Schwarzenegger and Linda Hamilton return to the franchise as the T-800 and Sarah Connor, respectively. Story details are being kept under wraps, but the film will serve as a direct sequel to “T2,” skipping the timelines of the three sequels.
See full article at Indiewire »

Gabriel Luna Is New Terminator; Natalia Reyes & Diego Boneta Also Set To Star In Tim Miller-James Cameron Skydance Reboot

  • Deadline
Exclusive: The search for a new Terminator to take over the first sanctioned Jim Cameron reboot since the original, is over. Director Tim Miller and producer Cameron have tapped Gabriel Luna for the role. Luna is best known for starring as Robbie Reyes/Ghost Rider on the ABC action superhero series Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D, as well as the El Rey Network drama series Matador. On the film side, he starred in the films Freeheld and Transpecos.

Natalia Reyes and Diego Boneta (Scream Queens) also have been set to star in the film.

The Terminator was resurrected by Skydance’s David Ellison in concert with James Cameron, who gets back a lot of the reversion rights to the original 1984 movie, next year. They’ve tapped Tim Miller, the Deadpool director. Luna joins Blade Runner 2049‘s Mackenzie Davis, Diego Boneta and returning cast members Arnold Schwarzenegger and Linda Hamilton,
See full article at Deadline »

Lost in Space Official Trailer

  • Cinelinx
About 2 weeks ago Netflx released the date announcement trailer for Lost In Space, where we got our first look at the Robinson family. Today they released the Official trailer for the show and we finally get a look at 'The Robot'. Let's check out the trailer below:

Alrighty then I'm in. My body is ready!! This time around it seems that the robot is not part of the original crew but an alien lifeform Will Robinson discovers after they get "lost". I gotta admit when i saw the robot it looked like some kind of advance scout for an invading alien force. This thing looks and sounds meanacing especially when it says that famous catch-phrase "Danger, Will Robinson!", part of me expected it to attack after saying it.

We also get a few scenes of Parker Posey who plays the role of Dr. Smith, the prerson responsible for for sabotaging
See full article at Cinelinx »

'My Days Of Mercy' with Ellen Page, Kate Mara to open BFI Flare festival

'My Days Of Mercy' with Ellen Page, Kate Mara to open BFI Flare festival
Postcards From London to close 32nd edition of London Lgbt Film Festival.

The 32nd edition of the BFI Flare: London Lgbt Film Festival has announced its opening and closing titles ahead of the event in March.

The festival will begin with Tali Shalom-Ezer’s My Days Of Mercy on Wednesday 21 March, and close with Steve McLean’s Postcards From London on Saturday 31 March.

From Princess director Shaolm-Ezer and starring Ellen Page (Juno, Inception, Freeheld) and Kate Mara (House Of Cards, The Martian), My Days Of Mercy is a love story between two women who differ in both their backgrounds and political perspectives.

The film is written by BAFTA nominated writer Joe Barton (The Ritual, iBoy), with Page and Mara producing alongside Christine Vachon and David Hinojosa. Great Point Media are handling international sales.

Postcards From London will have its European Premiere at the Festival; McClean’s first film since his 1994 Sundance hit Postcards From America is about Jim
See full article at ScreenDaily »

'My Days Of Mercy' with Ellen Page, Kate Mara to open BFI Flare

'My Days Of Mercy' with Ellen Page, Kate Mara to open BFI Flare
Postcards From London to close 32nd edition of London Lgbt Film Festival.

The 32nd edition of the BFI Flare: London Lgbt Film Festival has announced its opening and closing titles ahead of the event in March.

The festival will begin with Tali Shalom-Ezer’s My Days Of Mercy on Wednesday 21 March, and close with Steve McLean’s Postcards From London on Saturday 31 March.

From Princess director Shaolm-Ezer and starring Ellen Page (Juno, Inception, Freeheld) and Kate Mara (House Of Cards, The Martian), My Days Of Mercy is a love story between two women who differ in both their backgrounds and political perspectives.

The film is written by BAFTA nominated writer Joe Barton (The Ritual, iBoy), with Page and Mara producing alongside Christine Vachon and David Hinojosa. Great Point Media are handling international sales.

Postcards From London will have its European Premiere at the Festival; McClean’s first film since his 1994 Sundance hit Postcards From America is about Jim
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Women In Film La Announces Film Finishing Fund Recipients

“Half the Picture”

Thanks to Women In Film, Los Angeles, over a dozen projects by and about women are on their way to the finish line. The non-profit organization has announced the winners of the 32 annual film finishing fund. “370 feature-length narrative films, documentaries, and shorts were submitted from 22 countries and 16 were chosen as grantees,” Deadline reports.

As the source explains, “The Film Finishing Fund provides cash grants and in-kind production services to complete films that fit the established criteria of being by, for, or about women. The works-in-progress are viewed by a special jury of women in the industry who select the winning films.”

“One of the ways we achieve gender parity is by ensuring that female filmmakers have the resources they need to produce excellent work,” commented Wif Executive Director Kirsten Schaffer. “Women In Film is enormously proud that for 31 years we have enabled talented filmmakers to complete their
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Doc NYC 2017 Women Directors: Meet Alice Elliott — “Miracle on 42nd Street”

Miracle on 42nd Street

Alice Elliott is the Academy Award-nominated documentary filmmaker of “The Collector of Bedford Street.” Her short “Body & Soul: Diana & Kathy” was nominated for an International Documentary Association Award, and her films have been presented in over 100 film festivals, as well as on HBO and PBS.

Miracle on 42nd Street” will premiere at the 2017 Doc NYC film festival on November 11.

W&H: Describe the film for us in your own words.

Ae: It’s a documentary about affordable housing for artists, the transformation of Times Square, and the Manhattan Plaza housing complex. Former residents include Alicia Keys, Larry David, Giancarlo Esposito, Donald Faison, Samuel L Jackson, and Angela Lansbury, who are all in the film.

W&H: What drew you to this story?

Ae: When I grew up I was taught that artists were at best peripheral or unnecessary and at worst parasites on society. What I’ve learned is how valuable artists are to our communities. Artists provide stability, create safe spaces, and are engaged in their communities.

They help to grow the economy with galleries, workshops, and performance spaces. They attract vitality and make streets safer. Every community can provide affordable space for artists which will lead to better housing for everyone.

W&H: What do you want people to think about when they are leaving the theater?

Ae: How can we have affordable housing for artists and others in our community? What would that look like? What is the first step?

W&H: What was the biggest challenge in making the film?

Ae: Money and vision. It took us 10 years to make the film and we struggled with the direction, how to afford the archival footage, and how to tell the story in an engaging way.

W&H: How did you get your film funded? Share some insights into how you got the film made.

Ae: Very smartly our first producers created a 501c3 not-for-profit corporation. We then received extremely generous donations from individuals who wanted to see this unique story reach a large audience. When those donations ran out, I applied to the National Endowment for the Arts and received a major grant.

We also accepted many “in-kind” favors from people who believe in the necessity of affordable housing. Our stars were not contributors because we felt they gave their time and that was the most precious thing they could give. We are still seeking donations to cover licensing our footage for educational use.

W&H: What does it mean for you to have your film play at Doc NYC?

Ae: This is an extreme honor. Since the festival started, I’ve been attending and wishing, in my heart, to be part of it. What a moment this is — to work 10 years on a film and then get into the dream festival.

W&H: What’s the best and worst advice you’ve received?

Ae: Best advice: Say yes. Worst advice: Just let him do the talking.

W&H: What advice do you have for other female directors?

Ae: Work with other women, but don’t close the door to men. This has been a very happy gender collaboration. Hold on to your ideas, they have value, and join a support organization like Women in Film to help the women coming up. Share your experiences. Don’t keep hurtful secrets that other women need to know. Talk, lean in, speak up.

W&H: Name your favorite woman-directed film and why.

Ae: Today my favorite woman director is Cynthia Wade because she mentored me. She has a number of documentaries including the Academy Award-winning “Freeheld.” She’s younger than I am. She went to film school and taught me the basics. She has very high standards and is uncompromising in her vision. She’s not afraid of conflict and pain on the screen.

W&H: There have been significant conversations over the last couple of years about increasing the amount of opportunities for women directors yet the numbers have not increased. Are you optimistic about the possibilities for change? Share any thoughts you might have on this topic.

Ae: Since I teach at Nyu, I hope we are bringing women directors forward who are part of the solution. It’s really hard to change a bias as deeply embedded as that against women directors — and cinematographers, I might add. We must be the change we want to see. Really, every single one of us has that responsibility.

Doc NYC 2017 Women Directors: Meet Alice Elliott — “Miracle on 42nd Street” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Flatliners movie review: Doa

MaryAnn’s quick take… The reboot no one asked for of a movie no one much remembers has landed… and it’s dead on arrival, with nothing new to say and no new way to say it. I’m “biast” (pro): I’m a fan of some of the cast

I’m “biast” (con): tired of all the reboots

I have seen the source material (and I don’t much like it)

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

The reboot no one asked for of a movie no one much remembers has landed… and it’s dead on arrival. Oh, this new and pointless Flatliners deserves all the terrible death-related puns we can toss at it: “Someone should have put a do-not-rescusitate on the 1990 movie.” “A fate worse than death.” “Brain dead.” “Send it to the morgue.” C’mon, it’s fun!

I rewatched the
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Ellen Page: Her Evolution From Young Oscar Nominee to Gay Rights Advocate

Ellen Page: Her Evolution From Young Oscar Nominee to Gay Rights Advocate
Ten years after her breakthrough role in Juno, Ellen Page has maintained a steady presence in the spotlight.

The 30-year-old actress has gone from critical darling and early Academy Award nominee to a leading gay rights activist over the last decade, surprising the world with her bravery and poise when she decided to come out as gay.

Now starring in a remake of the ’80s cult classic Flatliners, Page has also kept up with a steady stream of movies that showcase the different facets of her talent. Read on for more about her evolution over the years.

Beginnings and Oscar
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Kingsman: The Golden Circle movie review: deliver us from “edgy”

MaryAnn’s quick take… Save us from male artists who think they are dangerously, uniquely innovative. This stew of toxic masculinity and CGI-cartoon violence is nothing but tediously mundane. I’m “biast” (pro): love the cast, mostly

I’m “biast” (con): hated the first film

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

Here’s a phrase I do not recall from Kingsman: The Secret Service: “independent intelligence agency.” This is uttered in Kingsman: The Golden Circle in connection with the American counterpart to Kingsman: Statesman, to which we are introduced here. But what does that mean, precisely? It means they’re mercenary spies, doesn’t it? I have a vague recollection of Secret Service mentioning something about Kingsman being funded by the crown heads of Europe, which at least offers a veneer of governmental authority and fealty to law and order — though of course there
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Battle of the Sexes movie review: totally ace

MaryAnn’s quick take… An essential history lesson with a smart smack of relevance for today (because feminism always has to be relitigated). It’s also warm, funny, and hugely entertaining. I’m “biast” (pro): I’m desperate for movies about women

I’m “biast” (con): not a sports fan at all

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

That saying about those not remembering the past being condemned to repeat it? Of course it’s true… but sometimes it’s not an accident that the past gets forgotten. Sometimes the squashing of history — and the continuation of history into the present — is deliberate. Feminists know this: Women are constantly having to reinvent feminism, refight the same battles, because they don’t stay won. A brief moment of small triumph very quickly gets drowned out by major cultural pushback; women may savor victory only long enough
See full article at FlickFilosopher »

Peter Sollett To Direct ‘Match’ For DreamWorks

Peter Sollett To Direct ‘Match’ For DreamWorks
Exclusive: Peter Sollett has been set to direct Match for DreamWorks Pictures. Scripted by Brenda Hsueh, the film is a romantic comedy set in a world where a federal agency finds your perfect match. Dylan Clark and Beau Bauman are producing for Dylan Clark Productions. Sollett's credits include Nick And Norah's Infinite Playlist and Freeheld. He is repped by CAA and attorney Morris…
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Julianne Moore Will Be Celebrated at 2017 MoMA Film Benefit

Julianne Moore in “Being Flynn”: David Lee/Focus Features

It looks like Julianne Moore is going to have a good autumn. The Oscar winner has three films coming out — “Kingsman: The Golden Circle,” “Wonderstruck,” and “Suburbicon” — and now The Hollywood Reporter writes that she will be honored at the Museum of Modern Art’s (MoMA) 2017 film benefit. Moore will be celebrated with a gala dinner and tribute at the November 13 event.

Past MoMA honorees Cate Blanchett, Tilda Swinton, and Kathryn Bigelow will be among the benefit’s attendees.

In addition to the dinner and tribute, the MoMA will further recognize Moore with a film series of the actress’ work. Screenings will be held November 2–12.

Julianne Moore is a fearless champion of risk-taking cinema,” MoMA film curator Rajendra Roy emphasized. “There appears to be no challenge she isn’t willing to tackle when it comes to upending expectations of what a ‘leading lady’ can or should do. She continues to inspire legions of actors around the world, and it is our honor to celebrate her phenomenal contributions to the art of film.”

The MoMA recently announced another women-centric event: “Powerfully Observant,” a retrospective of director Kelly Reichardt’s films. The series will run September 12–25, 2017 at The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters in New York.

Rebecca Miller’s “Maggie’s Plan” and “Freeheld” are among Moore’s recent film credits. The actress won a much-deserved Academy Award in 2015 for her portrayal of a woman with early-onset Alzheimer’s in “Still Alice.” Earlier this year, Moore took home the Giffoni Film Fest’s top prize, the Francois Truffaut Award, and signed on to topline a re-imagining of Sebastian Lelio’s “Gloria.”

Bel Canto,” which will see Moore as a renowned opera singer taken hostage alongside government officials and diplomats in South America, is currently in post-production. The adaptation of Ann Patchett’s novel is expected to hit theaters sometime in 2018.

Julianne Moore Will Be Celebrated at 2017 MoMA Film Benefit was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Tiff 2017 Announces More Galas and Special Presentations, Brie Larson’s “Unicorn Store” to Premiere

Brie Larson on the set of “Unicorn Store,” which will make its world premiere at Tiff 2017: Larson’s Instagram account

The Toronto International Film Festival unveiled yet another round of films and projects set to screen at its 2017 edition next month. With these new numbers, there is now a total of 20 Galas and 64 Special Presentations. Six of the 20 Galas are directed or co-directed by women, or 30 percent. The number is smaller for Special Presentations: Women helmed 13 of the 64 films, approximately 20 percent.

Among the most high-profile of the female-helmed special presentations is Brie Larson’s feature directorial debut, “Unicorn Store.” Written by Samantha McIntyre (“Married,” “People of Earth”), “Unicorn Store” stars Larson as a young woman who is invited to the store of her childhood dreams.

Of the six new galas Tiff announced today, only one is helmed by a woman: Tali Shalom-Ezer’s “My Days of Mercy.” The first film since Shalom-Ezer’s 2014 feature debut, “My Days of Mercy” stars Ellen Page (“Freeheld”) as Lucy, the daughter of a man on death row. She falls in love with Kate Mara’s (“House of Cards”) Mercy, whose family is on the other side of Lucy’s political cause.

Another notable Tiff addition is a screening of the Agnès Varda-co-directed “Faces Places” (“Visages Villages”) at the fest’s Masters Program. The Cannes l’Oeil d’Or-winning doc follows Varda and her fellow director, Jr, as they make their way through rural France, photographing and interviewing the people they encounter.

All of the new projects for Tiff’s Primetime television lineup feature a female director or female showrunner. Michelle MacLaren helmed an episode of “The Deuce,” HBO’s upcoming series about the burgeoning porn industry, while Mini Kerti directed an ep of “Under Pressure,” which follows the day-to-day events of an under-equipped, understaffed hospital in Rio de Janeiro. Jantje Friese and Amy Seimetz are the respective co-showrunners of “Dark,” Netflix’s first German-language series, and Starz’s sex work drama “The Girlfriend Experience.”

Tiff will be held September 7–17, 2017. Check out the recently added women-directed and co-directed Galas, Special Presentations, and program screenings below. Lists adapted from Tiff.

Galas

“My Days of Mercy”

Tali Shalom-Ezer, USA

World Premiere

Special Presentations

“Number One” (“Numéro Une”)

Tonie Marshall, France

World Premiere

“Outside In”

Lynn Shelton, USA

World Premiere

“Radiance” (“Hikari”)

Naomi Kawase, Japan/France

North American Premiere

Unicorn Store

Brie Larson, USA

World Premiere

Wavelengths Features

Caniba

Véréna Paravel, Lucien Castaing-Taylor, France

North American Premiere

“Le fort des fous”

Narimane Mari, France/Algeria/Switzerland/Germany/Greece/Qatar

North American Premiere

Tiff Masters Program

Faces Places” (“Visages Villages”)

Agnès Varda, Jr, France

Canadian Premiere

Our People Will Be Healed

Alanis Obomsawin, Canada

World Premiere

*Previously announced with the Canadian feature lineup

Zama

Lucrecia Martel, Argentina/Brazil/Spain/France/Netherlands/Mexico/Portugal/USA

North American Premiere

Primetime Lineup

Dark

Germany, 2 episodes

Showrunners: Jantje Friese, Baran bo Odar

Director: Baran bo Odar

World Premiere

The Deuce

USA, 2 episodes

Showrunners: David Simon, George Pelecanos

Directors: Michelle MacLaren, Ernest Dickerson

Episode 1, Canadian Premiere

Episode 2, World Premiere

The Girlfriend Experience

Season 2, USA, 4 episodes

Showrunners and directors: Amy Seimetz, Lodge Kerrigan World Premiere

“Under Pressure”

Brazil, 2 episodes

Showrunners: Andrucha Waddington, Jorge Furtado

Directors: Andrucha Waddington, Mini Kerti

International Premiere

Contemporary World Cinema

“Alanis”

Anahí Berneri, Argentina

World Premiere

Angels Wear White” (“Jia Nian Hua”)

Vivian Qu, China/France

North American Premiere

Beyond Words

Urszula Antoniak, Netherlands/Poland

World Premiere

Good Favour

Rebecca Daly, Ireland/Belgium/Denmark/Netherlands

World Premiere

“Looking for Oum Kulthum”

Shirin Neshat, Germany/Austria/Italy/Lebanon/Qatar

North American Premiere

Marlina the Murderer in Four Acts” (“Marlina si Pembunuh dalam Empat Babak”)

Mouly Surya, Indonesia/France/Malaysia/Thailand

North American Premiere

Miami

Zaida Bergroth, Finland

International Premiere

“On Body and Soul”

Ildikó Enyedi, Hungary

North American Premiere

Wajib

Annemarie Jacir, Palestine/France/Germany/Colombia/Norway/Qatar/United Arab Emirates

North American Premiere

Western

Valeska Grisebach, Germany/Bulgaria/Austria

North American Premiere

Tiff 2017 Announces More Galas and Special Presentations, Brie Larson’s “Unicorn Store” to Premiere was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Ellen Page’s Expressive Modern Dance to Sylvan Esso Is Her Queerest Role Yet — Watch

Ellen Page’s Expressive Modern Dance to Sylvan Esso Is Her Queerest Role Yet — Watch
In the three years since she came out as a lesbian in 2014, Ellen Page has taken on projects that feel closer to her authentic self. She played gay opposite Julianne Moore in last year’s “Freeheld,” played sister to fellow out queer Evan Rachel Wood in “Into the Forest,” and spearheaded the complicated feminist drama “Tallulah” as executive producer and star. She is also a producer and host of Vice’s “Gaycation,” a documentary series exploring gay lives around the world.

Read More‘Flatliners’ Trailer: Ellen Page Stops Hearts In the Horror Version of ‘The Oa’ — Watch

The raw emotion Page channels in “Slack Jaw,” a short dance film set to the haunting music of electronic pop duo Sylvan Esso, may be the most intimate performance the “Juno” star has yet to put to screen. Set in a spare studio with only a metal folding chair as a prop, Page
See full article at Indiewire »

Trailer Watch: Witness the Impact of Education in Vanessa Roth’s “Daughters of Destiny”

“Daughters of Destiny”

“I will show the world I am that girl who makes doorways of freedom, hope, and relief,” says one of the students at Shanti Bhavan in a trailer for “Daughters of Destiny.” Directed by Oscar winner Vanessa Roth, the four-part documentary series follows five girls growing up at co-ed residential school for “the poorest of the poor,” as the founder of Shanti Bhaven describes.

“The expectation for these girls and all the children who attend Shanti Bhavan is that they must grow up to support themselves, lift their families and communities out of poverty, and contribute to the larger world,” the series’ official synopsis details.

The trailer makes it clear that the girls have taken the school’s mission to heart. “I have to use the opportunity in order to change the life that I left behind,” one student says. Another adds, “I have the responsibility of giving back to society.”

Roth filmed the girls for seven years, and chronicles their struggle to re-define gender and class in the classroom and at home. She won an Oscar in 2008 for producing “Freeheld,” a doc short about a lesbian couple’s fight to share pension benefits. The story later inspired a narrative feature of the same name starring Julianne Moore and Ellen Page.

“Daughters of Destiny” launches on Netflix July 28.

https://medium.com/media/9cc66ddd6824e0ffe7d99849031bda8d/href

Trailer Watch: Witness the Impact of Education in Vanessa Roth’s “Daughters of Destiny” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Interview: Costume Designer Stacey Battat Talks Creating the Fashions of “The Beguiled”

The Beguiled”: Ben Rothstein/Focus Features

Costume designer Stacey Battat’s latest film is “The Beguiled,” which happens to be her fourth collaboration with filmmaker Sofia Coppola. Starring Nicole Kidman, Kirsten Dunst, and Elle Fanning, the film is a Civil War-set psychological thriller that focuses on a Southern girls’ boarding school and the chaos that ensues when a wounded Union soldier (Colin Farrell) arrives. The film has been generating a great deal of buzz since its debut at the 2017 Cannes International Film Festival, where Coppola won a Best Director prize.

Battat’s career as a Hollywood costume designer started in 2007 on Zoe R. Cassavetes’ indie film “Broken English.” Battat has since worked on a number of films including “Freeheld,” “Still Alice,” “What Maisie Knew,” and “The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby.” She has also designed costumes for a host of TV projects including “Mozart in the Jungle” and “Girls.” “The Bling Ring,” “Somewhere,” and Netflix’s “A Very Murray Christmas” are her previous collaborations with Coppola.

Women and Hollywood spoke to Battat about her costume choices, working with Coppola and “The Beguiled” cast and crew, the research it took to bring these strong but embattled women to life, and how costume design is the one Hollywood profession dominated by women.

The Beguiled” opens in limited release June 23, followed by a wider release June 30.

W&H: What was it like to work on a period piece set in the Civil War?

Sb: This was my first period movie. I had worked on a period TV show (“Z: The Beginning of Everything”), but [working on a film] is a big difference in a lot of ways. It has to be authentic. You can’t decide at the last minute that you wish a costume is red because you have already made it or rented it. That’s not an option. You have to really decide what is going to happen in advance.

W&H: Coppola has an atmospheric style in this film and your costume choices seem to fall right in line with its palette and lighting. What was your collaboration like with her and the other designers?

Sb: We always sit down and talk before production begins. So Anne Ross, the production designer, Sofia, myself, Philippe Le Sourd, our cinematographer, and film editor Sarah Flack sat down to talk about what kind of mood we wanted to create for this movie. I think we work together in a congruous way. It’s also nice to work with the same people over and over because you develop a similar language.

In this particular case, we wanted the film to be eerie but also beautiful. We talked about the film being ethereal, about the characters feeling like ghosts that had been left behind, about the clothes having a diaphanous quality, about light passing through the trees.

W&H: How did you research the Civil War era, and how did you find the fabrics and laces used to make the clothing?

Sb: I went to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and visited their textile center. I looked through fabric books from that era and was able to get a good grasp on what kinds of fabrics were available in the 1860s and bought material in retail stores. The buttons and lace are older. I scoured stores to find them.

W&H: How did the social etiquette of the time period play into your design choices?

Sb: The women had to stay covered. I put myself in their mindset and found out they were raised to essentially please men during that time period. I wanted to know what it’s always like to leave before the party is over and what was it like to always want a man to do something for you. I think that these things informed my decisions in a certain way but not in a specific way.

Walking around in a corset is complicated. It’s a different thing. You must breathe and stand differently. You can’t slouch. I think wearing one helped the actresses get into character.

The Beguiled”: Focus Features

W&H: Can you talk about each actress and what their costume brought to their specific character?

Sb: I wanted Nicole Kidman to feel in charge. I tried to accomplish that by not putting her in very colorful clothes, by putting her in more sedate prints, not flowered but polka dots and stripes.

I wanted Kirsten Dunst to feel romantic. She had come from a city, so in my mind, she was more sophisticated than the other girls. I tried to accomplish that by putting her in diaphanous fabrics.

I wanted Elle Fanning to feel flirty. I hope that the ruffles on her dresses accomplished that.

I wanted Oona Laurence to feel like her clothes were too big because she was either hungry or they were hand-me-downs from other girls at the school.

I put a lot of panels in Angourie Rice’s clothes to show she was still growing. Her fabrics didn’t always match the print, like a light green stripe to lengthen the sleeves of the dress she was wearing.

I wanted Addison Riecke to feel young. She was really funny, and I didn’t know her delivery would be so funny when I was making her costume. I wanted her to feel young and charming.

Emma Howard really looks like she’s from that period. I didn’t have to do a lot. She looked like she belonged to the 1860s.

W&H: There’s a big contrast between their buttoned up, pastel clothing and Colin Farrell’s. Can you please talk about the difference between dressing the two genders?

Sb: Dressing a man in that time period is just easier. There were a lot more constraints to the women’s clothing.

W&H: This film’s production took 26 days. What was it like working in this timeline on an independent film’s budget?

Sb: I had really great team. We were dressing seven to eight people at a time, and we managed to get into a good rhythm. I had the most incredible tailor in New Orleans named Patty Spinelli. I had an incredible costumer named Jennifer Watson. I had the best intern in the world. I feel like these people and support streamlined the production process.

W&H: What is it like being a female costumer designer in Hollywood?

Sb: The one thing I will say is that we are the one profession in Hollywood that is primarily female. I mean, no other area of the profession is. Camera operators, production designers, DPs are generally men but costume designers are generally women — across the board.

Certainly being a woman in Hollywood has certain drawbacks but also merits. I know there is a lot of disparity in the way women are paid as opposed to men, but when I hear about my friends who are lawyers talking about the crazy misogyny that happens in their workplace, I think about how glad I am to be a woman in Hollywood. I wish there were more women filmmakers. There should be more women directors, and more women directors of photography.

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Interview: Costume Designer Stacey Battat Talks Creating the Fashions of “The Beguiled” was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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