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‘The Artist’ Filmmaker Michel Hazanavicius Says Lars von Trier Is “Not A Nazi” And Talks Cannes Controversies

Back in 2012, “The Artist” was the darling of the awards season. Picking up tons of accolades, including five Oscars, the French film turned filmmaker Michel Hazanavicius into one of the most recognizable filmmakers on the planet. That’s what made 2014’s “The Search” such a disappointment. After the highest of highs in 2012, Hazanavicius came back down to Earth in 2014 to tons of harsh criticism.
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Cannes Board Member Michel Hazanavicius on Lars von Trier and Godard: ‘You Can Be a Jerk in Your Personal Life and a Great Artist’

Cannes Board Member Michel Hazanavicius on Lars von Trier and Godard: ‘You Can Be a Jerk in Your Personal Life and a Great Artist’
Filmmaker Michel Hazanavicius knows about extreme reactions. His film “The Artist” was a sensation at the Cannes Film Festival, and with the support of The Weinstein Company, swept the 2012 Academy Awards. Two years later, his remake of the Fred Zinneman’s classic 1948 film “The Search” was trashed by the press at Cannes and barely received a theatrical release. With “Godard Mon Amour,” his playful look at a young Jean-Luc Godard (Louis Garrel), he landed somewhere in the middle of the spectrum: It divided critics at Cannes and will receive a limited theatrical release in the U.S. almost a year later.

You can’t please everyone all the time and neither has Jean-Luc Godard, as Hazanavicius’ film explains with scenes involving the political radicalization of the character that led some to charge him with anti-Semitism. Sitting down in a New York hotel with IndieWire, Hazanavicius mused on Godard’s modern
See full article at Indiewire »

'The Artist' Helmer Michel Hazanavicius on Portraying Renowned French New Wave Director Godard

'The Artist' Helmer Michel Hazanavicius on Portraying Renowned French New Wave Director Godard
Many love his films, but few have ever had the experience of falling in love with Jean-Luc Godard. In his latest film, Godard Mon Amour, which premiered last year at Cannes under the title Le Redoutable, Oscar-winning director of The Artist Michel Hazanavicius brings to life the memoir of Godard's ex-wife Anne Wiazemsky in a dramedy focused on the clash between the French New Wave icon's marriage and his obsession with radical revolutionary philosophies after the May '68 protests in France. 

Hazanavicius tells THR he was a huge fan of Godard's early work, but was drawn to his story because of Anne's narration. "I read the book written by Anne Wiazemsky, his ex-wife during that period, and...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Jean-Luc Godard’s 4 Best Movies, According to the Director of ‘Godard Mon Amour’

Jean-Luc Godard’s 4 Best Movies, According to the Director of ‘Godard Mon Amour’
Jean-Luc Godard has been one of the most celebrated filmmakers for nearly 60 years, and he’s not slowing down anytime soon. At the 2018 Cannes Film Festival, the 87-year-old filmmaker will premiere “The Image Book” in Official Competition. However, while Godard’s stature hasn’t changed, the French New Wave legend is far away from the kind of films he made during the first decade of his career, when his whimsical and daring formalism transformed him into an internationally renowned artist. His transition into an angrier recluse, more inclined toward experimental projects with abstract political views, forms the centerpiece of “Godard Mon Amour” (previous titled “Redoubtable”), director Michel Hazanavicius’ playful dramatization of a young Godard (Louis Garrel) and his relationship with muse Anne Wiazemsky (Stacy Martin). Wiazemsky, who passed away last year, wrote a memoir that forms the basis of the movie — but “Godard Mon Amour” is mostly a referendum on
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes Adds Lars von Trier’s ‘The House That Jack Built,’ Sets Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ as Closer

Cannes Adds Lars von Trier’s ‘The House That Jack Built,’ Sets Terry Gilliam’s ‘Don Quixote’ as Closer
Danish director Lars von Trier is returning to the Cannes fold with his serial-killer drama “The House That Jack Built” after seven years of banishment from the festival, while Terry Gilliam’s long-gestating, problem-plagued “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote” is set to close the event, organizers announced Thursday. Both films will screen out of competition.

Cannes also added two sophomore outings to the competition lineup – Yann Gonzalez’s “Knife + Heart” and Sergei Dvortsevoy’s “The Little One” – plus Palme d’Or winning filmmaker Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s “The Wild Pear Tree.” “Whitney,” Kevin Macdonald’s documentary on singer Whitney Houston, has been set as a Midnight Screening, as has HBO’s new adaptation of “Fahrenheit 451,” directed by Ramin Bahrani and starring Michael B. Jordan and Michael Shannon – the latest television project to screen at Cannes.

Artistic director Thierry Fremaux had hinted that von Trier would return to the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Godard Mon Amour' Review: Biopic on Filmmaker Won't Leave You Breathless

'Godard Mon Amour' Review: Biopic on Filmmaker Won't Leave You Breathless
Jean-Luc Godard is one of the founders of the French New Wave – and, at 87, he's still kicking at the limits lesser intellects erect around cinema. (His new film, a video essay called Le Livre d'Image, will compete at Cannes in May). Now Michel Hazanavicius, director of 2011's Oscar-winning salute to the silent film era The Artist, has rustled up the nerve to put the Godard story onscreen. Well, not the whole story – just the period from 1967 to 1968, when the moviemaker met and married actress Anne Wiazemsky, then 19, and became radicalized
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Playtime Acquires Un Certain Regard Drama ‘Angel Face,’ With Marion Cotillard

Playtime Acquires Un Certain Regard Drama ‘Angel Face,’ With Marion Cotillard
Playtime has acquired international sales to Vanessa Filho’s feature debut “Angel Face,” which will world premiere in Un Certain Regard at the Cannes Film Festival.

The film stars Oscar-winning actress Marion Cotillard as Marlene, a single mother who lives with her 8-year-old daughter, Elli, in a small town near the French Riviera. One day, Marlene suddenly chooses to abandon her daughter for a man she has just met during yet another night of excess. Elli must confront her mother’s demons to get her back.

Shot by star cinematographer Guillaume Schiffman (“The Artist”), “Angel Face” is produced by well-established producer Marc Missonnier (“Marguerite”) via his banner, Moana Films, and Carole Lambert (“Free Angela and All Political Prisoners”) through her new company, Windy Production. Stephane Celerier’s Mars Films is co-producing and will distribute it in France on May 23.

Angel Face” was written by Filho, in collaboration with Alain Dias,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jean-Luc Godard Doesn’t Have Time for Your Bullshit in Exclusive Clip from ‘Godard Mon Amour’

One of his classics is on the official poster for Cannes Film Festival and he has a highly-anticipated new feature premiering at the festival, so it’s a fitting time for a new biopic surrounding Jean-Luc Godard to arrive. After taking on the silent era with his Best Picture-winning The Artist, Michel Hazanavicius will now focus on the French New Wave era with Godard Mon Amour (formerly Redoubtable), which arrives in theaters next week.

Featuring Louis Garrel as Godard and Stacy Martin as Anne Wiazemsky, the film depicts their relationship within the director’s late-60s “revolutionary period,” beginning with the production of his Mao-centered La Chinoise. Today we’re presenting an exclusive clip from the film courtesy of Cohen Media Group, which finds a fan of Godard singing his praises to him on the street without much to say. As one can imagine, Godard’s reaction is anything but pleased.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Watch Exclusive International Trailer to Pablo Trapero’s ‘La Quietud’

Watch Exclusive International Trailer to Pablo Trapero’s ‘La Quietud’
Cannes — A first international trailer of Pablo Trapero’s “La Quietud,” his awaited follow-up to Venice best director winner “The Clan.”

Starring Martina Gusmán (“Lion’s Den”) and Bérénice Bejo (“The Artist”), “La Quietud” marks a change of register for Trapero, an intense drama with thriller elements set in Argentina’s upper-class in a country whose dark past still weighs upon the present.

A study of the relationship dynamics between two sisters, “La Quietud” kicks off as one, Eugenia (Bejo) returns from Paris after return from Paris to the family’s rural estate, La Quietud, after the father is hospitalized following a stroke.

There she reunites with her younger sister, Mia, (Gusmán) and their mother, whom she hasn’t seen in 15 years. Despite a love-hate relationship, the sisters discover more in common than they might have thought.

But “La Quietud” is set against a none too distant past of the
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The new silent era: how films turned the volume down

Amid the thunderous noise of much modern cinema, films such as A Quiet Place and Wonderstruck show that the power of keeping quiet is seriously underrated. Time to enjoy the silence

A Quiet Place is a smart, scary little shocker that uses restraint in the area of sound to enhance its visual horrors. Give or take the score, the odd whisper and the occasional blood-curdling roar, John Krasinski’s film deals in cinema’s most underused commodity: silence. This will be music to the ears of anyone overwhelmed by the cacophonous use of sound in modern film, but there is a narrative reason too: the movie is set in a world terrorised by blind carnivorous monsters with acute hearing. The only way to avoid their gnashing jaws and lunging talons is to keep shtum. Communication between the main characters – a family of five hiding in an underground shelter – is conducted chiefly through sign language,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

John Goodman movies: 20 greatest films ranked from worst to best, including ‘The Big Lebowski,’ ‘Barton Fink’ …

John Goodman movies: 20 greatest films ranked from worst to best, including ‘The Big Lebowski,’ ‘Barton Fink’ …
John Goodman shockingly never won an Emmy for his role as working-class father Dan Conner in “Roseanne” despite competing seven consecutive times as Best Comedy Actor for the ABC sitcom (1989-1995). He did eventually win as Best Drama Guest Actor in 2007 for “Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip,” but now he could finally cash in that “Roseanne” Emmy I.O.U. with the upcoming series revival, premiering on Tuesday, March 27. But Goodman hasn’t only made a name for himself on TV. In honor of his return to the small screen, let’s take a look back at some of his best big-screen performances. Tour through our photo gallery above of Goodman’s 20 greatest films, ranked from worst to best.

Surprisingly (and criminally), not one of these roles brought Goodman an Oscar nomination. He did compete at the Golden Globes as Best Supporting Actor for “Barton Fink” (1991), but the academy
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Godard Mon Amour’ Trailer: Louis Garrel Is Jean-Luc Godard in Michel Hazanavicius’ Delightful Romance

‘Godard Mon Amour’ Trailer: Louis Garrel Is Jean-Luc Godard in Michel Hazanavicius’ Delightful Romance
You’ve fallen in love with his films, but only a lucky few have fallen in love with Jean-Luc Godard himself. The French New Wave icon is at his most lively in “Godard Mon Amour,” a tragicomedy from “The Artist” director Michel Hazanavicius. Based on actress-turned-author Anne Wiazemsky’s 2015 memoir, “Un An Apres” (“One Year Later”), the film premiered at Cannes last year under the title “Redoubtable.”

Godard Mon Amour” stars Louis Garrel (“Ismael’s Ghosts”) as a radical young Godard, during his short-lived marriage to Wiazemsky, played by Stacy Martin (“Nymphomaniac”). Set in 1968 during the filming of “La Chinoise,” the movie’s reception and the political climate provokes Godard into a profound self-examination, which propels the newlyweds in different directions.

In Eric Kohn’s 2017 review for IndieWire, he wrote: “The movie toys with Godard’s own early filmmaking style in a wry effort to salute his legacy and demystify its evolution.
See full article at Indiewire »

Miami Moviegoers Reveal the Role of Art Houses for Latin American Audiences

Like everything else, Miami is bigger than it used to be. At 5.5 million, the burgeoning Miami-Dade population is the eighth largest metro area in the U.S. You hear Spanish everywhere, from the glitzy Vegas-level Faena Hotel — resplendent wth full-length lobby murals from Pedro Almodovar’s poster designer Juan Gatti, a stuffed peacock, and Damien Hirst’s $15-million 14K gold-painted mastodon skeleton encased in glass perilously close to the ocean — to the famed neon-deco restorations lining Collins Avenue on South Beach, Little Havana’s Ball & Chain, the wild grafitti art at Wynwood Walls and a gut-busting range of South American restaurants, from Chile to Peru.

And you hear Spanish at Miami-Dade College’s sprawling Miami Film Festival, which — after eight years under director Jaie Laplante — leans into its Ibero-American identity via a strong program dominated by Spanish-language films amid a diverse array of narratives, shorts and documentaries.

Headquartered at Belle
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Miami Moviegoers Reveal the Role of Art Houses for Latin American Audiences

Like everything else, Miami is bigger than it used to be. At 5.5 million, the burgeoning Miami-Dade population is the eighth largest metro area in the U.S. You hear Spanish everywhere, from the glitzy Vegas-level Faena Hotel — resplendent wth full-length lobby murals from Pedro Almodovar’s poster designer Juan Gatti, a stuffed peacock, and Damien Hirst’s $15-million 14K gold-painted mastodon skeleton encased in glass perilously close to the ocean — to the famed neon-deco restorations lining Collins Avenue on South Beach, Little Havana’s Ball & Chain, the wild grafitti art at Wynwood Walls and a gut-busting range of South American restaurants, from Chile to Peru.

And you hear Spanish at Miami-Dade College’s sprawling Miami Film Festival, which — after eight years under director Jaie Laplante — leans into its Ibero-American identity via a strong program dominated by Spanish-language films amid a diverse array of narratives, shorts and documentaries.

Headquartered at Belle
See full article at Indiewire »

Recommended New Books on Filmmaking: ‘The Shape of Water,’ Jean-Luc Godard, Yuletide Terror, and More

Our latest deep-dive into recent books on cinema is heavy on 2017 follow-ups. But there’s also a unique look at late Godard, a romp through holiday horror, and a visually inventive stroll through 101 memorable movies. Let’s march on, starting with every cinephile’s buddy, Guillermo del Toro.

Guillermo del Toro’s The Shape of Water: Creating a Fairy Tale for Troubled Times by Gina McIntyre (Insight Editions)

Guillermo del Toro’s fairy tale romance The Shape of Water was heralded by some as one of 2017’s finest (I’m in that camp) or as 2017’s The Artist (boo). Wherever one stands in this debate, its aesthetic beauty is undeniable. In other words, Shape is more than deserving of the Insight Editions treatment. The book is a gorgeous concoction, filled with del Toro’s endearing sketches, effects tests, film stills, and, best of all, accompanying text that is smart and
See full article at The Film Stage »

Best Picture winners sweeping the Oscars may officially be over

Best Picture winners sweeping the Oscars may officially be over
The Shape of Water” won a leading four Oscars this year: Best Picture, Best Director for Guillermo del Toro, Best Original Score and Best Production Design. While any film would be grateful to earn four Oscars, especially the top prize, this total is low compared to many other Best Picture winners throughout history, particularly technical achievements such as this one. Does this mean the era of Best Picture winners sweeping the ceremony has come to an end?

SEEMichael B. Jordan to add an inclusion rider to his contracts after Frances McDormand’s fiery Oscars speech

Oscar history shows that 49 Best Picture winners have collected at least five trophies throughout the night. Yet, the only Bp winner to do so this decade is “The Artist” in 2011, which won five awards, but even in that case it tied the night with “Hugo” also winning five. The sweet spot for most of the
See full article at Gold Derby »

Bob Weinstein Trying to Find Buyer Who Will Keep Weinstein Company Operating as ‘Going Concern’

Bob Weinstein Trying to Find Buyer Who Will Keep Weinstein Company Operating as ‘Going Concern’
Bob Weinstein assured staffers that payroll obligations at the Weinstein Company will be met and said he is working to sell the embattled indie studio to a buyer who will keep it operating. The Weinstein Company is on the verge of filing for bankruptcy after a deal to sell itself to a group of investors led by billionaire Ron Burkle and former Small Business Administration chief Maria Contreras-Sweet collapsed on Tuesday. A Chapter 11 filing could come as early as next week.

“The board is still in discussions with potential buyers who want to keep the company and employees as a going concern,” Weinstein wrote to employees. “That has been one of our main goals and we are still pursuing it. Payroll obligations will be continued to be met.”

Lionsgate is possibly interested in buying parts of the Weinstein Company’s film and television library, but would not want to own the business outright.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

All the history-making fun facts ‘The Shape of Water’ set with its Best Picture Oscar win

All the history-making fun facts ‘The Shape of Water’ set with its Best Picture Oscar win
“If you are a nominee tonight who isn’t making history, shame on you,” Jimmy Kimmel chided in his Oscars monologue Sunday. “The Shape of Water” doesn’t need to saunter off with its head down because the Best Picture champ made a whole lot of history by taking the top prize, one of four awards it won.

Here’s a list of all the droughts that were ended, records that were set and stats that were killed (say it with me: no SAG ensemble nomination!) by “The Shape of Water” with its Best Picture victory.

See How I knew ‘The Shape of Water’ would beat ‘Three Billboards’ for Best Picture

– First film since “Braveheart” (1995) and second overall to win without a SAG ensemble nomination

– First film since “Braveheart” to win without acting, writing or editing wins

– First film with a female lead to win since “Million Dollar Baby” (2004)

– First
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘The Shape of Water’ was the 1st December release to win Best Picture Oscar since ‘Million Dollar Baby’ (2004)

‘The Shape of Water’ was the 1st December release to win Best Picture Oscar since ‘Million Dollar Baby’ (2004)
The Shape of Water” was an unconventional Oscars choice for Best Picture in many ways: the amphibian romance, the fantasy elements, the female-centered story. And it was the first film since “Braveheart” (1995) to win without a corresponding SAG Award nomination for its ensemble. So it might have gotten lost in the shuffle that the film bucked another significant trend: it opened on December 1, which makes it the first December release to win Best Picture since “Million Dollar Baby” (2004).

The conventional wisdom is that it’s advantageous to release films late in the year to make a strong last impression on Oscar voters, and that still tends to be true. It’s relatively rare to see top Best Picture contenders released before September. But there’s a limit to how late an impression you want to make. Starting with the 2004 ceremony honoring the best films of 2003, the Oscars telecast moved up
See full article at Gold Derby »

This Fact About The Shape of Water's Best Picture Win Will Make You Want to Scream

The Shape of Water's huge wins at the Oscars on Sunday night were important for a lot of people for a lot of different reasons. First of all, the film is directed by Guillermo del Toro, who stressed the importance of winning an Oscar as an immigrant during his best director speech ("I think the greatest thing that does and our industry does is erase the line in the sand. We should continue doing that, when the world tells us to make it deeper"). Secondly, the supernatural romance - which follows a mute woman (Sally Hawkins) who falls in love with a fish-man (Doug Jones) being brutally experimented on at the lab she works at as a cleaner - marks the first best picture win with a female lead since Million Dollar Baby. You know when Million Dollar Baby won its Oscar? 2005. Yes, it's been 13 years since a movie with
See full article at BuzzSugar »
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