6.8/10
16,645
53 user 87 critic

Night Train to Lisbon (2013)

Trailer
1:31 | Trailer

Watch Now

From $3.99 on Prime Video

ON DISC
Raimund Gregorius, a Swiss Professor, abandons his lectures and buttoned-down life to embark on a thrilling adventure that will take him on a journey to the very heart of himself.

Director:

Bille August

Writers:

Greg Latter (screenplay), Ulrich Herrmann (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
3 wins & 3 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Jeremy Irons ... Raimund Gregorius
Mélanie Laurent ... Young Estefânia
Jack Huston ... Amadeu
Martina Gedeck ... Mariana
Tom Courtenay ... Older João Eça
August Diehl ... Young Jorge O'Kelly
Bruno Ganz ... Older Jorge O'Kelly
Lena Olin ... Older Estefânia
Marco D'Almeida ... Young João
Beatriz Batarda ... Young Adriana
Christopher Lee ... Father Bartolomeu
Charlotte Rampling ... Older Adriana
Nicolau Breyner Nicolau Breyner ... Da Silva
Jane Thorne Jane Thorne ... Older Clotilde
Burghart Klaußner ... Judge Prado
Edit

Storyline

About an aging Swiss professor of classical languages who, after a chance encounter with a Portuguese woman, quits his job and travels to Lisbon in the hope of discovering the fate of a certain author, a doctor and poet who fought against Portuguese dictator Antonio de Oliveira Salazar. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Your life can change in an instant. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for a scene of violence, and brief sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Official Facebook | Official site | See more »

Language:

English | Portuguese

Release Date:

6 December 2013 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Comboio Noturno Para Lisboa See more »

Filming Locations:

Caxias, Portugal See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

€7,700,000 (estimated)

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$8,962,375, 13 September 2013
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The scene when Adriana (Charlotte Rampling) first meets Raimund in her home has a lot of similarities with the scene in Angel Heart (1987) where Charlotte Rampling's character Margaret Krusemark receives Harry Angel (Mickey Rourke) in her home. In both scenes, it's the first (and rather uncomfortable meeting) between the characters. In both scenes, Rampling offers tea and makes some comments about the choice of tea. In both scenes, a maid is asked to bring the tea and an old photograph of the father of Ramplings character is discussed and becomes important to the scene. See more »

Goofs

When Raimund (Irons) comes to the hotel (my timer shows 51 minute of the movie length), he takes the keys, and then in the room he opens the closet door, and we see the film crew members (the two contours) reflecting in mirror of that door. See more »

Quotes

Adriana de Prado: I believe you are looking for my brother.
Raimund Gregorius: Yes. Is the doctor in?
Adriana de Prado: Are you ill?
Raimund Gregorius: No. I'm... I'm reading this book. I'd very much like to meet him. What he writes touches me very deeply.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Salesman (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

Nunca & Tarde
Composer: Annette Focks
Lyrics & Vocal: Maria Carvalho
Portugese Guitar: David Pircher
Guitar: António de Brito, Cello: Benjamin Walbrodt
Sound Mixer: Tim Tautorat
Recording & Mix Strudio: Emil Berlin Studios
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A journey into one's self
26 March 2013 | by hotemeileSee all my reviews

Night Train to Lisbon is one of the most philosophical movies to hit theaters in the last couple of years. The trip started by Raimund is not between places but between identities. An existential journey into the great unknown of the soul. Some say we take ourselves everywhere we go. This movie tries to tell us instead that we *find* ourselves in those places, we discover a new way of seeing with our own eyes and, when we leave, a part of us stays in that place forever. Returning there is a way of visiting ourselves, like we would an old friend... There's so many layers, so many subtle metaphors, so much poetry in the imagery and storytelling, that despite being such a straightforward story you can't help feeling like you're walking through a maze, a labyrinth of emotions and thoughts, where present, past and future merge into a vast uplifting eternity. One of the best crafted uses of mise-en-abîme i recall ever seeing in a movie! Raimund is Raimund, but he's also Pascal Mercier, and also Amadeu Prado and also You. There's a fiction within a fiction here: a book within a book within a movie. A lie within a lie: a poet within a reader, within a spectator, within a person. This dilution between fiction and reality and between the actor and the audience often occurs, but rarely is it ever a theme, rarely is it ever presented as a question to the audience and rarely so beautifully answered. This game of mirrors will leave you full of wonder and hungry for life. There couldn't be a better outcome for a story that starts with a suicide attempt... There's too many reasons to watch this movie and too little space to review it properly unfortunately... The scenery of Lisbon, the universal anguish of the characters, the excruciating portrayal of the Portuguese dictatorship, the lessons it offers on some of the most important questions one can ask oneself... Do yourself a favor and go see it!


138 of 150 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 53 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Popular Action and Adventure Titles With Prime Video

Explore popular action and adventure titles available to stream with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed