Fringe (2008–2013)
8.4/10
1,380
8 user 2 critic
A series of Fringe events leads the team to the home of a woman grieving over the death of her husband, while Peter and Olivia make an effort to repair the emotional rift between them.

Director:

Thomas Yatsko

Writers:

J.J. Abrams (created by), Alex Kurtzman (created by) | 3 more credits »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Anna Torv ... Olivia Dunham / Alternate Olivia Dunham
Joshua Jackson ... Peter Bishop
Lance Reddick ... Phillip Broyles
Blair Brown ... Nina Sharp
Jasika Nicole ... Astrid Farnsworth
John Noble ... Dr. Walter Bishop
Seth Gabel ... Alternate Lincoln Lee
Phyllis Somerville ... Alice Merchant
Ken Pogue ... Derek Merchant
Ryan McDonald ... Brandon Fayette
Michelle Brezinski ... Mrs. Marcello
D. Harlan Cutshall ... SWAT Agent
Conan Graham Conan Graham ... Rick Kimball
Colby Johannson ... Chris
Monica Mustelier Monica Mustelier ... Sylvia
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Storyline

When a group of guest falls during a party from the veranda of an apartment building in Brooklyn to sidewalk, the Fringe Division is assigned to investigate. Olivia, Peter and Walter learn that the building is considered haunted and the residents are moving away. Walter sees the position of the bodies and conclude they have felt through the balcony and concludes the place has a crack to the parallel universe. Olivia notices a glow from the apartment 6B and the widow Alice Merchant believes she can contact the ghost of her husband Derek from the beyond. But soon Walter, Olivia and Peter conclude she is contacting Derek from the parallel universe. Meanwhile Peter tries to mend Olivia's broken heart and rekindle her feelings for him. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


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Details

Country:

USA | Canada

Language:

English

Release Date:

18 February 2011 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

16:9 HD
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The apartments where the initial fringe event occurs is called the Rosencrantz Building. Walter shows that the building is a site of anomalous disruption of the laws of physics because he flips a coin and it lands on heads ten times in a row, a statistical improbability. These are references to Tom Stoppard's 1966 play "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead," which opens with its two main characters (who are also two minor characters from Shakespeare's Hamlet) betting on coin flips. Against the laws of probability, Rosencrantz bets heads--and wins--ninety-two times. See more »

Goofs

(at around 20 mins) When Walter breaks the glass panel to demonstrate the universe breaking through, the camera angle moves from back to front of the glass panel but the fractures do not match up. From the one camera angle the radial fractures form a five point star with the top point almost directly north and a concentric fracture around the middle, and from the other angle the fractures form a six point star with the top two points running towards the corners of the frame the glass panel sits in and no concentric fracture visible. See more »

Connections

References Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead (1990) See more »

Soundtracks

For Once in My Life
(uncredited)
Written by Ronald Miller and Orlando Murden
erformed by Stevie Wonder
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User Reviews

 
A beautiful story, both standalone and well fitted into the series.
27 February 2011 | by honorhorrorSee all my reviews

Actually, there are some respected reviewers around on the internet that didn't care much about this episode, and simply dismissed it as a boring, slow-pacing soap opera. It is sad, that after almost 3 full seasons, Fringe still suffers from a misplaced ID card, that loudly writes "Sci-fi horror" more than "mytery and fantasy".

This episode, in my opinion, is the very episode in Season 3 that matches up to the quality of what was considered to be Fringe's "Constant"--"Peter". On an emotional level, they both showed the determination of the creators to transform it from a X-file wannabe into the cousin of "Lost", which is good because "Monster of the week" formula gets old in these days, especially if you had the familiar monsters and just gave them a slightly different but still quite over-the-head explanation(X-files would say "blame the aliens" while Fringe would say "blame the other dimension").

You don't necessarily need to be charmed by movies like Up to appreciate the subtlety of this episode. In fact, it's very fun and funny to compare it to Up for many similar qualities, like the interchange of metaphors and various paralleling themes. The relationship between the old couple living in the apartment was somewhat a mirror to Peter and Olive's twisted entanglement, be it "quantum" enough or not. "To cross the line" is like the keyword of this episode because Walter, P&O, and the old couple all have lines to cross for similar reasons. The final result? They got paid off all in satisfying ways. For Walter, it's just touching to see a crazy genius' moral struggling to match up to the coldness of his nemesis, his arch-enemy. It's also a precious reminder to me that it is those at power that needs people's care and consideration the most--before we conclude and wrap them up in monstrous coverages. For the old couple, it's even more interesting because "Crossing over" or "cross the line" to them really have more layers than those main roles. To them, the very line they would probably be crossing is a line of sanity, reason, common senses and even religious conviction or clarity. This is a highlight of "Fringe"'s struggles at heart. Though I'm not really bought into the mythology of Fringe, I'd like to appreciate their effect and artistic considerations of presenting the tongue-in-the-cheek differences/similarities between alternate dimensions and afterlife.

And, to the stars of the show, Peter and Olive, their line to cross is a both the borderline between 2 universes and the invisible line marked by Olivia's emotional scar, as she kept on resenting the fact that which would have possibly been the most important and beautiful part of her life was stolen by her arch[-enemy. Ethically speaking(gosh, if there are still anything that can be called ethical if there are really two universes at war) Peter and Olivia belonged to different worlds, and they'd better leave each other untouched to prevent further complications. Yet, as complications and conflicts both marched on regardless of their position, it's also relieving to see they have the courage to come to terms, which finished building up the story's many further possibilities.

Way to go, Fringe team! And best wishes.


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