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Following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy fights through grief and trauma to regain her faith, console her children, and define her husband's historic legacy.

Director:

Pablo Larraín

Writer:

Noah Oppenheim
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Popularity
2,824 ( 349)
Nominated for 3 Oscars. Another 42 wins & 159 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Natalie Portman ... Jackie Kennedy
Peter Sarsgaard ... Bobby Kennedy
Greta Gerwig ... Nancy Tuckerman
Billy Crudup ... The Journalist
John Hurt ... The Priest
Richard E. Grant ... Bill Walton
Caspar Phillipson ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy
John Carroll Lynch ... Lyndon B Johnson
Beth Grant ... Lady Bird Johnson
Max Casella ... Jack Valenti
Sara Verhagen ... Mary Gallagher
Hélène Kuhn ... Pam Turnure
Deborah Findlay ... Maud Shaw
Corey Johnson ... Larry O'Brien
Aidan O'Hare ... Kenny O' Donnell
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Storyline

Jackie is a portrait of one of the most important and tragic moments in American history, seen through the eyes of the iconic First Lady, then Jacqueline Kennedy. Jackie places us in her world during the days immediately following her husband's assassination. Known for her extraordinary dignity and poise, here we see a portrait of the First Lady as she fights to establish her husband's legacy and the world of "Camelot" that she created and loved so well. Written by Fox Searchlight Pictures

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

I want them to see what they have done to Jack.


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for brief strong violence and some language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

Chile | France | USA | Hong Kong | Germany

Language:

English | Spanish

Release Date:

2 December 2016 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Džeki See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$9,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$278,715, 2 December 2016, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$13,958,679, 14 April 2017

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$11,692,444, 27 January 2017
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color | Black and White (some sequences)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Of A Tour of the White House (1962) hosted by Jacqueline Kennedy, Pablo Larraín said: "When I saw the White House tour, I couldn't stop watching it. It said so much about Jackie, and who she would become. I knew we had to add it to the film. She hadn't been on television before in that way, and it wasn't something she enjoyed, but John encouraged her to do it, in part because she'd been wrongly criticized for spending taxpayer dollars on the renovation, even though it was done with private funding. Yet, she was amazing, giving the tour in such a compelling way." Indeed, Jackie emphasized in her presentation that she felt the White House should not be thought of merely as the home and workplace of the President, but as a showcase for American history, art culture, and a place of national pride. See more »

Goofs

When Jackie is looking around Arlington Cemetery the day after her husband's death, the flag in the background is at full staff. But on that day every flag in the country, especially one at Arlington, would have been at half staff. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
The Journalist: Mrs. Kennedy? They told me to come up. And I'm so sorry for your loss.
Jackie Kennedy: Have you read what they've been writing? Krock and Merriman and all the rest?
The Journalist: Yes, I have.
Jackie Kennedy: Merriman's such a bitter man. It's been just one week. Already they're treating him like some dusty old artifact to be shelved away. That's no way to be remembered.
The Journalist: And how would you like him remembered, Mrs. Kennedy?
Jackie Kennedy: [stammering] I...
Jackie Kennedy: You understand that I will be editing this conversation just in case I don't say exactly ...
[...]
See more »

Connections

Featured in Film '72: Episode #46.1 (2017) See more »

Soundtracks

Camelot: Finale Ultimo
Composed by Frederick Loewe
Lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner
Performed by Richard Burton and the Camelot Ensemble
Published by Chappell & Co., Inc.
Courtesy of Sony Music Entertainment
See more »

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User Reviews

 
"And the Oscar goes to... Natalie Portman"
22 January 2017 | by bob-the-movie-manSee all my reviews

"Jackie" tells the story of the spiralling grief, loss and anger of Jackie Kennedy driven by the assassination of JFK in Dallas in November 1963. Hopping backwards and forwards in flashback, the film centres on the first interview given by Jackie (Natalie Portman, "Black Swan") to a 'Time' journalist (Billy Crudup, "Watchmen", "Spotlight").

Through this interview we flashback to see Jackie as the young First Lady engaged in recording a TV special for a tour of the White House: nervous, unsure of herself and with a 'baby girl' voice. This contrasts with her demeanour in the interview which – although subject to emotional outburst and grief – is assured, confident and above all extremely assertive. We live the film through Jackie's eyes as she experiences the arrival in Dallas, the traumatic events of November 22nd in Dealey Plaza, the return home to Washington and the complicated arrangement of the President's funeral.

This is an acting tour de force for Natalie Portman, who is astonishingly emotional as the grief-stricken ex-first lady. She nails this role utterly and completely. Having already won the Golden Globe for an actress in a dramatic role, you would be a foolish man to bet against her not taking the Oscar.

In a key supporting role is Peter Sarsgaard ("The Magnificent Seven") as Bobby Kennedy (although his lookalike is not one of the best: that accolade I would give to Gaspard Koenig, in an un-speaking role, as the young Ted Kennedy).

Also providing interesting support as Jackie's priest is John Hurt ("Alien", "Dr Who") and, as Jackie's close friend, the artist Bill Walton, is Richard E Grant ("Withnail and I", who as he grows older is looking more and more like Geoffrey Rush – I was sure it was him!).

Director Pablo Larraín (whose previous work I am not familiar with) automatically assumes that EVERYONE has the background history to understand the narrative without further explanation: perhaps as this happened 54 years ago, this is a bit of a presumption for younger viewers? Naturally for people of my advanced years, these events are as burned into our collective psyches as the images in the Zapruder film.

While the film focuses predominantly, and brilliantly, on Jackie's mental state, the film does gently question (via an outburst from Bobby) as to what JFK actually achieved in his all too short presidency – 'Will he be remembered for resolving the Cuban missile crisis: something he originally created?' rants Bobby. In reality, JFK is remembered in history for this assassination and the lost potential for what he might have done. I would have liked the script to have delved a little bit further into that collective soul-searching.

This is a very sombre movie in tone, from the bleak opening, with a soundtrack of sonorous strings, to the bleak weather-swept scenes at Arlington cemetery. The cinematography (by Stéphane Fontaine, "Rust and Bone") cleverly contrasts between the vibrant hues of Jackie's "Camelot" to the washed-out blueish tones of the post-assassination events. If you don't feel depressed going into this film, you probably will be coming out! But the journey is a satisfying one nonetheless, and the script by Noah Oppenheim – in a SIGNIFICANT departure from his previous teen-flick screenplays for "Allegiant" and "The Maze Runner" – is both tight and thought-provoking.

Overall, a recommended watch.

Finally, note that for those of a squeamish disposition, there is a very graphic depiction of the assassination from Jackie's point-of-view…. but this is not until nearly the end of the film, so you are reasonably safe until then! Also as a final general whinge, could directors PLEASE place an embargo on the logos of more than two production companies coming up at the start of a film? This has about six of them and is farcical, aping the (very amusing) parody in "Family Guy" (google "family guy logos").

(For the graphical version of this review please visit bob-the-movie-man.com. Thanks.)


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