Mad Men (2007–2015)
8.5/10
1,129
2 user 7 critic

Chinese Wall 

The partners try to keep their cool after they discover that Roger has lost their biggest account, Peter's wife goes into labor, and Don tries to convince Faye to compromise her ethics to drum up new business.

Director:

Phil Abraham

Writers:

Matthew Weiner (created by), Erin Levy
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
Jon Hamm ... Don Draper
Elisabeth Moss ... Peggy Olson
Vincent Kartheiser ... Pete Campbell
January Jones ... Betty Francis (credit only)
Christina Hendricks ... Joan Harris
Jared Harris ... Lane Pryce (credit only)
Aaron Staton ... Ken Cosgrove
Rich Sommer ... Harry Crane
Kiernan Shipka ... Sally Draper (credit only)
Robert Morse ... Bertram Cooper
John Slattery ... Roger Sterling
Joel Murray ... Fred Rumsen
Ray Wise ... Ed Baxter
Cara Buono ... Faye Miller
Jessica Paré ... Megan Calvet
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Storyline

Despite Peggy's less than friendly last encounter with Abe, the two begin a relationship following a chance social outing with Joyce. Stan can smell Peggy's resulting sexual energy. Unaware of Abe, Stan tries to exploit what he sees as Peggy's want for sex. And Trudy has gone into labor. But as Peggy states, when something good happens, something bad always happens. The bad is the rumor of Lucky Strike abandoning SCDP, which comes into the firm through the back door i.e. not from Roger, the one and only person in the firm dealing with that account. But once the rumor spreads amongst the partners, Roger does confirm the rumor but does whatever he can to hide the fact that he's known about Lucky Strike leaving for some time. The loss of this account potentially could mean the end of SCDP, especially if this news makes current and potential clients feel uncertain about SCPD's future. The partners try to put on a brave face to the staff, who are asked to be more diligent than ever with ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

lingerie slip | See All (1) »

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

TV-14 | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

3 October 2010 (USA) See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

16:9 HD
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Faye compliments Don's "punim" in this episode, he is not sure what she is talking about. "Punim is a Yiddish word meaning "face"; this was taken by a number of TV writers (for example, Diane Winston at the Huffington Post; Rachel Shukert at Slate; Sarah Seltzer and Anne Cohen at Forward) as one of several pieces of evidence that Faye Miller is a Jewish character. This was confirmed by Cara Buono, the actress who plays Faye, in an L A Times interview. When asked to list ways she is different form Faye, she answered, "I have naturally dark, almost black hair and she's blond. She's also Jewish. The line she says in the phone booth when she's telling her boyfriend off. "Go ... in the ocean." That's an English translation of a Yiddish expression. And her father, though he's a gangster, he's not of Italian descent." See more »

Goofs

As Joan and Roger hug in her apartment, the position of her head keeps changing between shots. See more »

Quotes

Peggy Olson: Every time something good happens, something bad happens.
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Soundtracks

Welcome To My World
(uncredited)
Written by Ray Winkler and John Hathcock
Performed by Jim Reeves
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User Reviews

 
nothing is going to change..
31 July 2018 | by merelyaninnuendoSee all my reviews

Mad Men

Mad Men; one of the most acclaimed series by critics, loved by the fans and buzzed at the award shows, is a character driven series created by Matthew Weiner depicting the inner world of an ad agencies set in '60s in New York. The writing is sharp, elaborative, adaptive and exquisite that keeps the audience tangled in its not-so-likable and faulty world on the edge of their seat.

It is rich on technical aspects like projecting the chemistry among the characters, stunning cinematography, beautiful camera work, references mentioned in the conversations and the classic tone of the series that makes it supremely watchable.

The primary reason why the series stands alone is not only its nature to work in a metaphorical way but to weave out a poem from the sequence, is the genuine soul behind it that attains a certain closure in each episode. The performance objective is score majestically by the cast especially by the protagonist Jon Hamm who is supported convincingly by the cast like Elisabeth Moss, Vincent Kartheiser, January Jones and John Slattery.

The practical conversations, the whistle-blowing dialogues, three-dimensional characters, excellent execution, finely detailed set-pieces, alluring costume design are the high points of the series that helps it enter the major league.

Season 04

As much as aware they are of their each character's perspective, the fourth act seems to have unexpected and bold decisions that leads to both disappointing and an exhilarating experience especially the track that depicts the repercussions that Hamm's divorce breeds on his family.

Chinese Wall

The office politics and issues that it dealt with at the stage, is aptly depicted but it also seems to be out-of-time and on few aspects repetitive for it to disenchant the viewers and on Hamm's perspective there has been few inessential calls.


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