5.8/10
33,640
199 user 239 critic

Rubber (2010)

Trailer
2:25 | Trailer
A homicidal car tire, discovering it has destructive psionic power, sets its sights on a desert town once a mysterious woman becomes its obsession.

Director:

Quentin Dupieux

Writer:

Quentin Dupieux
5 wins & 3 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Stephen Spinella ... Lieutenant Chad
Jack Plotnick ... Accountant
Wings Hauser ... Man in Wheelchair
Roxane Mesquida ... Sheila
Ethan Cohn ... Film Buff Ethan
Charley Koontz ... Film Buff Charley
Daniel Quinn ... Dad
Devin Brochu ... Son
Hayley Holmes ... Teenager Cindy
Haley Ramm ... Teenager Fiona
Cecelia Antoinette Cecelia Antoinette ... Black Woman (as Cecilia Antoinette)
David Bowe ... Mr. Hughes
Remy Thorne ... Zach (as Remi Thorne)
Tara Jean O'Brien ... Cleaning Lady (as Tara O'Brien)
Thomas F. Duffy ... Cop Xavier
Edit

Storyline

A homicidal car tire, discovering it has destructive psionic power, sets its sights on a desert town once a mysterious woman becomes its obsession.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Careful Where You Tread. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Fantasy | Horror

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some violent images and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The director, writer, cinematographer, editor and composer, Quentin Dupieux, is also known as Mr. Oizo. See more »

Goofs

When the boy rides his bike, he is wearing long socks at first, but in a later scene those change to short socks. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Lieutenant Chad: In the Steven Spielberg movie "E.T.," why is the alien brown? No reason. In "Love Story," why do the two characters fall madly in love with each other? No reason. In Oliver Stone's "JFK," why is the President suddenly assassinated by some stranger? No reason. In the excellent "Chain Saw Massacre" by Tobe Hooper, why don't we ever see the characters go to the bathroom or wash their hands like people do in real life? Absolutely no reason. Worse, in "The Pianist" by Polanski, how come...
[...]
See more »

Crazy Credits

In a list of credits prior to the final credits, the rubber tire appears as an actor named Robert. See more »

Connections

References JFK (1991) See more »

Soundtracks

Just Don't Want To Be Lonely
Lyrics and music by Vinnie Barrett, John C Jr Freeman and Bobby Eli
Performed by Blue Magic
See more »

User Reviews

 
I am Rubber, you are Glue. I'll blow up your head and roll over it, too!
15 February 2011 | by CoventrySee all my reviews

Which two words would you, and hopefully any other reasonable human being, use to describe a movie with a plot synopsis like this: an ordinary rubber tire comes to life in the middle of the Californian desert, quickly discovers that he disposes of dangerous telepathic powers and goes on a murderous stroll. The tire violently blows up people's heads left, right and center while a cinematic audience follows his joyful escapades from a safe distance through binoculars. Well, most likely but completely justified you will use the words "absurd" and "random". The most clever gimmick about this film, however, is that it actually points out the randomness before you even have the opportunity to ponder about it. "Rubber" opens with an extended spoken monologue by one of the characters and he repeatedly emphasizes the fact that everything in this film happens for absolutely no reason at all. Even more so, "Rubber" is an hour and a half long homage to randomness. Robert the tire comes to life for no reason. He can make small animals and human heads explode for no reason. He chases a cute brunette girl around for no reason. A group of bizarre people observe him like it's a real life movie for no reason. You get the picture.

One could claim, of course, that writer/director Quintin Dupieux' approach is innovative, courageous and humorous. This is true, in fact, but sadly just for a very brief period. The first few images of a seemingly half-drunken tire rolling through the sand and causing cute little bunny rabbits to explode are undeniably hilarious (if you share the same twisted sense of humor, that is) but it becomes dull and derivative enormously fast. The "no reason" gimmick quickly loses its panache and general fun-factor. Okay, so there's a psychopathic tire on a rampage and it doesn't make any sense. We would have understand that after five exploding heads instead of fifty as well. If "Rubber" had been a short feature, it would have been equally effective. Perhaps even more. Also, and this might be a purely personal opinion, I don't really like it when director hide themselves behind the randomness excuse. Everyone can think up a story that makes absolutely no sense. It's too easy like that. Obviously I think there are several good things to enjoy about "Rubber" as well, otherwise I wouldn't have given the average rating. The desolate filming locations and complementary references towards older movies are fun to spot. It was also tremendously cool to see former B-movie star Wings Hauser ("Night Shadows", "Vice Squad") in a prominent role again after so long. The special effects and make-up art look adorably cheesy and the electro/experimental soundtrack is quite awesome. The latter quality shouldn't come too much as a surprise, since writer/director Quintin Dupieux is primarily known as a musician and scored a humongous hit in the late 1990's as Mr. Oizo with "Flat Beat".


38 of 66 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 199 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

France | Angola

Language:

English

Release Date:

10 November 2010 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Rubber See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$500,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$16,346, 3 April 2011

Gross USA:

$100,370

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$101,729
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page

We've Got Your Streaming Picks Covered

Looking for some great streaming picks? Check out some of the IMDb editors' favorites movies and shows to round out your Watchlist.

Visit our What to Watch page



Recently Viewed