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Oscars: ‘Shape of Water’ Win Marks Awards Season Capstone for Venice Film Festival

Oscars: ‘Shape of Water’ Win Marks Awards Season Capstone for Venice Film Festival
Here’s a thought to chew on: It’s been 11 years since the best picture Oscar went to a film — Martin Scorsese’s “The Departed” — that hadn’t premiered at a film festival (though it did screen as a work in progress at the 2006 Toronto fest to select eyeballs). Prior to that, festival indies were the exception rather than the norm in the best picture race, which was ruled by the kind of big-studio prestige pics that didn’t need the momentum-building progression of a festival rollout.

Needless to say, a lot has changed at the Oscars (and, indeed, in Hollywood) this century, as the kind of tony, adult-oriented drama that tends to rule awards season has become largely the preserve of the independent realm. Film festivals, meanwhile, have been drawn ever more integrally into the Oscar dance: the imagined “official” kickoff of awards season may come with the early-fall trifecta of Venice,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Movie Review – Happy End (2017)

Happy End, 2017.

Written and Directed by Michael Haneke.

Starring Isabelle Huppert, Fantine Harduin, Jean-Louis Trintignant, Mathieu Kassovitz, Laura Verlinden, Franz Rogowski, Aurélia Petit, and Toby Jones.

Synopsis:

A drama about a family set in Calais with the European refugee crisis as the backdrop.

There is a lot going on in Happy End, the latest film from celebrated auteur Michael Haneke (Amour, Cache, The White Ribbon, so on and so forth), to the point where the end result is messy and disconnected. The characters are cold and unworthy of investing in, which isn’t a surprise to anyone familiar with the director, but long stretches of Happy End test patience and fail to generate any reaction. This is largely due to an unwieldy amount of subplots that never form into the bigger picture, even though all the major characters are part of the same dysfunctional, unhappy family. Depression and suicide are
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

E.U.’s Media Program Begins Battle to Secure Future

A mainstay of Europe’s film and TV business for 27 years, plowing €2.4 billion ($3.0 billion) into the industry since 1999, the future of the European Union’s Creative Europe Media Program is now in doubt.

Nobody questions that it will be renewed for 2021-27. The big question is whether it will have the budget to continue making a real impact. That is no given. So suddenly it is the Media Program, its potential budget and changes, which is drawing large heat in discussions of Europe’s audiovisual future.

The Commission is currently accepting ideas for the next Media Program. It will make its formal proposal later this year. So it will not commit too far at the moment as to possible change.

Held at the Berlin Film Festival, a European Film Forum, introduced by a keynote by the E.U. Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society, Mariya Gabriel, sketched out, however, some
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Oscars flashback: Birthday girl Jennifer Jones (‘The Song of Bernadette’) wins Best Actress [Watch]

Oscars flashback: Birthday girl Jennifer Jones (‘The Song of Bernadette’) wins Best Actress [Watch]
There have been 342 Oscars given out to actors, but only one of them has won on their birthday. Jennifer Jones scored Best Actress for “The Song of Bernadette” on her 25th birthday at the 16th ceremony on March 2, 1944.

Jones received the award from reigning champ Greer Garson (“Mrs. Miniver”), which you can watch in the academy’s recap video above. It was the actress’ only win from five nominations, but none of the other ceremonies fell on her birthday.

See Oscar Best Actress gallery: See every winner in history

Several people have won close to their birthdays: Marie Dressler (1930’s “Min and Bill”), Peter Ustinov (1960’s “Spartacus”), Holly Hunter (1993’s “The Piano”) and Lupita Nyong’o (2013’s “12 Years a Slave”) all got a belated birthday gift from the academy the next day. Dianne Wiest (1994’s “Bullets Over Broadway”) received an early birthday present, winning her second Best Supporting Actress
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘A Fantastic Woman’: Groundbreaking transgender love story on track to win Chile its 1st Oscar for Best Foreign Film

  • Gold Derby
‘A Fantastic Woman’: Groundbreaking transgender love story on track to win Chile its 1st Oscar for Best Foreign Film
“I hope I’m the last cisgender man playing a transgender woman,” said Jeffrey Tambor when he won his second Emmy for playing Maura Pfefferman in “Transparent” in 2016. That series arrived at a moment when the conversation around transgender representation was evolving from a call for greater representation of transgender characters in general to a call for more transgender actors to be hired to actually play those roles. Now “A Fantastic Woman” is helping to break that ground with its transgender protagonist played by a transgender actress leading the way to a potential first ever Oscar victory for Chile.

Daniela Vega stars in the film as a trans woman whose lover dies suddenly, leaving her in a tense conflict with his surviving family. It’s nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the Oscars, and it’s likely to win according to our latest predictions. Based on the combined forecasts
See full article at Gold Derby »

Berlinale 2018: Isabelle Huppert to Lead Anne Fontaine’s New Film, Fest Hosts Gender Equality…

Berlinale 2018: Isabelle Huppert to Lead Anne Fontaine’s New Film, Fest Hosts Gender Equality EventsHuppert in “Amour”: Darius Khondji/Sony Pictures Classics

The 68th Berlinale hasn’t reached its midway point yet but it’s already seen the announcement of Anne Fontaine’s next film and organized events focusing on industry gender discrimination. According to separate reports from Variety, Isabelle Huppert will star in Fontaine’s “Pure as Snow” and directors discussed the gender gap in European cinema during a panel presented by Eurimages. South African filmmakers also launched #ThatsNotOk, a campaign tackling workplace harassment.

“Pure as Snow” is an erotic comedy based on the Brothers Grimm’s “Snow White” fairy tale. Lou de Laâge, the star of Fontaine’s “The Innocents,” will play Claire, who works for her cruel stepmother Maud at her late father’s hotel. “Claire unwittingly sparks uncontrollable jealousy in Maud (Huppert), whose young
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Michael Haneke Says #MeToo Movement Leads to ‘Man-Hating Puritanism’

Michael Haneke Says #MeToo Movement Leads to ‘Man-Hating Puritanism’
Austrian filmmaker Michael Haneke has joined the group of mainly international voices expressing their doubt about the #MeToo movement, decrying it as causing a reversion to “Puritanism.”

In an interview with Austrian daily Kurier published Friday, the two-time Palme d’Or winner was asked whether he thought there had recently been a tendency to rebuild taboos, for example as a result of the #MeToo debate. Though he said he “of course” thinks “any form of rape or coercion” is punishable, he also referred to the current movement as “prejudice hysteria” and said he finds it “disgusting.”

“I do not want to know how many of these charges related to incidents 20 or 30 years ago are primarily statements that have little to do with sexual assault,” he added.

“This new, man-hating Puritanism, coming in the wake of the #Metoo movement, worries me,” he said, referring to the “malignancy” that he said often comes across on the Internet and makes
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Michael Haneke Criticizes #MeToo: ‘Witch Hunts Should Be Left in the Middle Ages’

  • Indiewire
Michael Haneke Criticizes #MeToo: ‘Witch Hunts Should Be Left in the Middle Ages’
Don’t expect Michael Haneke to tweet his support for #MeToo anytime soon. The two-time Palme d’Or winner criticized the movement in an interview with the Austrian Daily Kurier, saying, “I regard this hysteria of rash judgments that is spreading at the moment as absolutely disgusting.”

“People are just being finished off in the media, [their] lives and careers are being ruined,” he said. Haneke clarified that “any kind of rape or [sexual] coercion should be punished,” but things are going too far based on “totally unperceived malignance, the blind rage that is not based on facts.”

This fast-and-loose approach “destroys the lives of people, whose crime has not been proven in many cases,” he continued. “This new man-hating puritanism that comes in the wake of the #MeToo movement worries me,” and men “should hardly even touch this topic” at this point.

“This has nothing to do with the fact that
See full article at Indiewire »

2018 DGA Awards winner is Oscar frontrunner for Best Director

On Feb. 3, the Directors Guild of America will reveal its pick for the best film helmer of the year at the 70th annual edition of its awards. The five DGA nominees are: Guillermo del Toro (“The Shape of Water”), Greta Gerwig (“Lady Bird”), Martin McDonagh (“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri”), Christopher Nolan (“Dunkirk”) and Jordan Peele (“Get Out”).

All but McDonagh are in contention at the Academy Awards. If one of the four double nominees wins with the guild, they are all but certain to take home the Oscar on March 4 as well. The DGA aligned itself with the Academy Awards calendar in 1950. Since then all but seven of its winners for Best Director have repeated at the Oscars.

Although the DGA does an outstanding job at anointing the eventual Oscar winner, it is less sure-footed at previewing the five Oscar nominees. In its first 15 years, there were anywhere from four to 18 DGA nominees.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar-winning director Michael Haneke to make 10-part TV series

Austrian confirms he is working on Kelvin’s Book, an English language dystopian drama

Michael Haneke has become the latest high-profile film director to turn his hand to the small screen after revealing he is working on a 10-part English language TV series.

The Austrian director, who won the Palme d’Or at Cannes and best foreign language Oscar in 2012 for his film Amour, confirmed he is working on Kelvin’s Book, a dystopian story set in the near future.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Oscar-winning director Michael Haneke to make 10-part TV series

Austrian confirms he is working on Kelvin’s Book, an English language dystopian drama

Michael Haneke has become the latest high-profile film director to turn his hand to the small screen after revealing he is working on a 10-part English language TV series.

The Austrian director, who won the Palme d’Or at Cannes and best foreign language Oscar in 2012 for his film Amour, confirmed he is working on Kelvin’s Book, a dystopian story set in the near future.

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

‘Kelvin’s Book’: Michael Haneke to Create His First TV Series, a High-Concept Drama Set in a Near-Future Dystopia

  • Indiewire
‘Kelvin’s Book’: Michael Haneke to Create His First TV Series, a High-Concept Drama Set in a Near-Future Dystopia
No longer content to confine his brand of feel-bad nihilism to movie theaters, Michael Haneke is working on his first TV series. “Kelvin’s Book” will consist of 10 episodes and is described as a high-concept venture by FremantleMedia’s Ufa Fiction, which is developing the series with everyone’s favorite Austrian auteur.

Read More:Michael Haneke Says He’s Not ‘Dark’ but If ‘Happy End’ Disturbs, That’s Your Problem

The series is “set in a dystopian world and will tell the adventurous story of a group of young people in a not too distant future. During a flight, they are forced to make an emergency landing outside of their home and are confronted with the actual face of their home country for the first time.” As for his motivations, Haneke said simply, “After ten TV-movies and twelve films, I wanted to tell a longer story for once.”

Read More:Michael Haneke
See full article at Indiewire »

Christopher Plummer Becomes Oldest Actor to Be Nominated for an Oscar

Christopher Plummer Becomes Oldest Actor to Be Nominated for an Oscar
Christopher Plummer has received his third Oscar nomination for his performance as J. Paul Getty in “All the Money in World” as a last-minute replacement for Kevin Spacey, becoming the oldest acting Oscar nominee ever at 88.

Director Ridley Scott persuaded Plummer in early November to join the project following sexual harassment and assault allegations against Spacey. Mark Wahlberg, Michelle Williams, and Timothy Hutton re-shot scenes later that month with Plummer, and Scott was able to re-edit the film in time for a Christmas Day release.

Sony released its first trailer with Plummer as Getty on Nov. 29, nine days after Scott started the re-shoots.

In becoming the oldest person to receive an acting Oscar nomination, Plummer eclipses the mark set in 1998 by Gloria Stuart for “Titanic,” who was 87 at the time she was nominated. Emmanuelle Riva was 85 when she was nominated for “Amour.” Plummer already holds the record as the oldest winner of an acting Oscar, set in 2012 when
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Top 5 jaw-dropping Oscar nominations that could happen on Tuesday include ‘Mudbound,’ ‘The Florida Project’…

Top 5 jaw-dropping Oscar nominations that could happen on Tuesday include ‘Mudbound,’ ‘The Florida Project’…
What jaw-dropping Oscar nominations could happen Tuesday morning? Though the odds may be against them, we shouldn’t be too surprised if these contenders in top categories are called out during the nominations announcement. Here are the top five most shocking inclusions that might conceivably happen:

See Oscars 2018: Nomination predictions in all 24 categories according to Gold Derby Experts, Editors, and Users combined odds

#5: Steve Carell (“Battle of the Sexes”) in Best Supporting Actor

Have we been underestimating Steve Carell this whole time? A past Best Actor nominee for “Foxcatcher” (2014), Carell has contended at the Golden Globes, SAG Awards, and Critics Choice Awards for his showy performance as tennis pro Bobby Riggs in “Battle of the Sexes.” True, the fact that he competed as a lead at the Globes and as a supporting actor at SAG could cause some category confusion (just ask Hugh Grant from “Florence Foster Jenkins
See full article at Gold Derby »

Denis Villeneuve (‘Blade Runner 2049’) and Luca Guadagnino (‘Call Me by Your Name’): Does BAFTA nom – DGA snub = Oscar nomination?

Denis Villeneuve (‘Blade Runner 2049’) and Luca Guadagnino (‘Call Me by Your Name’): Does BAFTA nom – DGA snub = Oscar nomination?
Filmmakers Denis Villeneuve (“Blade Runner 2049”) and Luca Guadagnino (“Call Me by Your Name”) were snubbed by the Directors Guild Awards, but both scored BAFTA bids. Since the British academy moved up its awards to precede the Oscars starting in 2000, five of its nominees for Best Director have made it in at the Academy Awards despite being left off the DGA roster. Can Villeneuve and Guadagnino do the same?

Back in 2000, Stephen Daldry was on the hunt for an Oscar for “Billy Elliot.” Things started out badly when he was snubbed by both the Golden Globes and the DGA. That year three directors contended at the Golden Globes, DGA Awards, and BAFTAs on their way to Oscar nominations: Ang Lee for “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” Ridley Scott for “Gladiator” and Steven Soderbergh for both “Erin Brockovich” and “Traffic.” With the fifth slot still up for grabs, English filmmaker Daldry scored
See full article at Gold Derby »

As Industry Awards Move Forward, ‘The Shape of Water’ Takes the Lead

As Industry Awards Move Forward, ‘The Shape of Water’ Takes the Lead
The new year has brought the usual wave of guilds and industry groups weighing in on the year’s best work. Editors, art directors, casting directors, writers, makeup artists, and now, producers, have all chimed in this week, with cinematographers, sound mixers, visual effects artists, and directors still to come.

And pay attention. This is momentum week, as Oscar voters receive ballots Friday and will vote for a single pressure-cooked week. It will be pencils down on Jan. 12.

The December circuit made it clear what film is the critical darling of the year: Jordan Peele’s “Get Out,” which has claimed 12 best picture prizes so far. But “critics don’t vote for Oscars” is always an important mantra this time of year. Conversely, the guilds have crossover membership with the film Academy, so it’s worth taking serious note of their choices.

At this point, Guillermo del Toro’s “The Shape of Water” has reaped the most
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Happy End' Review: Michael Haneke Returns With Another Feel-Bad Drama

'Happy End' Review: Michael Haneke Returns With Another Feel-Bad Drama
Austrian writer-director Michael Haneke has made many a masterpiece – and his latest, Happy End, isn't one of them. Yet this cinematic poke in the eye about an upper class family imploding still exerts a perverse fascination. From early provocations like The Seventh Continent (1989) through later boundary-pushing works like The Piano Teacher, Cache, The White Ribbon, Funny Games (both the original and it's English-language remake) and Amour, the fillmaker specializes in the toxic indifference that can kill a family or society as a whole. He offers no easy answers. As the
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Phantom Thread, The Post, Proud Mary and all of the movies you need to see in January

  • Cineplex
Phantom Thread, The Post, Proud Mary and all of the movies you need to see in JanuaryPhantom Thread, The Post, Proud Mary and all of the movies you need to see in JanuaryAdriana Floridia1/3/2018 2:13:00 Pm

It's time to start a new year at the movies.

2017 was a wonderful year for film, but we're already looking forward to what 2018 has in store. This month we have a variety of art house, action, and sweet bears in blue jackets. Check out the movies you need to see in theatres this January below!

These are the movies you have to see this January:

Phantom Thread

Release Date: January 5th, 2018

For Fans of: Fashion, Romance, Paul Thomas Anderson

See it with: A friend

Daniel Day Lewis has formally announced that Phantom Thread will be his last film, as he's retiring from acting. In his last film performance, he plays a renowned dress
See full article at Cineplex »

In Memoriam: Movie Stars We Lost in 2017

In Memoriam: Movie Stars We Lost in 2017
The past year saw the loss of some renowned character actors, including John Hurt, Bill Paxton and Harry Dean Stanton. We were both shaken and stirred by the death of Roger Moore, who played James Bond more than any other actor. On the other side of the camera, directors Jonathan Demme as well as horror masters Tobe Hooper and George A. Romero died in 2017.

Here’s a month-to-month look at some of the biggest names in the film world who died in 2017.

In January, “The Elephant Man” star Hurt died on Jan. 27. The 77-year old actor also starred in “Alien” and “Midnight Express.” Emmanuelle Riva, the French star of “Hiroshima Mon Amour” and more recently, “Amour,” died on Jan. 27 at 89.

Bill Paxton, who appeared on TV in “Big Love” and in films including “Titanic” and “Aliens,” died Feb. 25. He was just 61.

The Silence of the Lambs” director Demme, who had been suffering from cancer, died April 26 at
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘The Post’ Joins Top 2017 Specialty Box Office Openers

  • Indiewire
“The Post” (20th Century Fox), Steven Spielberg’s recreation of the 1971 Pentagon Papers First Amendment saga, opened strongly in nine theaters over three cities (Washington D.C. logically added to the usual New York and Los Angeles platform dates). On a weekend prior to Christmas that normally is not prime for its core older audience, it scored a strong initial result across the board. Its numbers in the four key usual platform theaters placed it among the biggest limited openers of the year, with likely better results still to come.

Two other openers, Michael Haneke’s “Happy End” (Sony Pictures Classics) and the Christian Bale western “Hostiles” (Entertainment Studios) also braved the tricky playtime to disappointing results. They are competing against multiple already established awards titles that continue to prosper in varying degrees.

The Darkest Hour” (Focus) had its broadest break to date, edging out by a small margin the
See full article at Indiewire »
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