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‘Love Affair(s)’ Review: Cheaters First Betray Their Own Ideals in French Infidelity Drama

‘Love Affair(s)’ Review: Cheaters First Betray Their Own Ideals in French Infidelity Drama
America has the Oscars; France has the César Awards. In a normal year, being nominated for 13 of the latter would be a sign of an exceptional achievement in French cinema — a phenomenon on par with “Amélie” or “A Prophet” commanding recognition in nearly every category en route to worldwide acclaim. But 2020 was not a normal year, and it’s a bit misleading to see writer-director Emmanuel Mouret’s mildly carbonated ensemble drama “Love Affair(s)” up for so many awards, knowing it’s hardly insta-classic material.

The movie, which was to premiere at Cannes had the festival not been canceled by the coronavirus, concerns the romantic entanglements of (at least) nine characters whose actions often contradict the way they see themselves. How can we be so sure? These eloquent characters love to hear themselves talk — and so do we, as there’s a poetry to their near-constant stream of conversation
See full article at Variety »

The full soundtrack of Sel’s Bandish Bandits from Amazon Prime’s musical drama has been released!

The full soundtrack of Sel’s Bandish Bandits from Amazon Prime’s musical drama  has been released!
Amazon Prime Video in association with Sony Music Entertainment India recently launched the much-loved soundtrack of Amazon Original Series Bandish Bandits. Marking the digital debut of the extraordinary music composer trio Shankar Mahadeva, Ehsaan Noorani, and Loy Mendosa, the album has received universal acclaim with the songs trending across major music services and mediums. Sel’s versatile album, includes contemporary and classical music, through an eclectic mix of classical, folk, pop and fusion tracks created specifically for the show. Some of the powerful vocals of the album include those of Shankar Mahadevan, Armaan Malik, Jonita Gandhi, Mame Khan, Shivam Mahadevan, Shreeya Sondur, among others.

“The music of Bandish Bandits has played a huge part in the success of the series. Audiences have loved the fact that it seamlessly weaves itself into the story and keeps them immersed in it till the very end.” said Gaurav Gandhi, Director and Country Gm Amazon Prime Video,
See full article at Bollyspice »

‘Buoyancy’ Surfaces With Virtual Debut, ‘Rent-a-Pal’ Offers Friendly Thrills, ‘Sibyl’ Brings The Psychodrama – Specialty Streaming Preview

‘Buoyancy’ Surfaces With Virtual Debut, ‘Rent-a-Pal’ Offers Friendly Thrills, ‘Sibyl’ Brings The Psychodrama – Specialty Streaming Preview
The origin of the drama Buoyancy can be traced back to when Australian filmmaker Rodd Rathjen came across an article a few years ago about Cambodian workers and their life on a Thai fishing trawler. He became riveted by the unbelievable story and upon more research, he said in a statement: “The scale of modern slavery and exploitation in Thailand is vast and hard to grasp.”

Written and directed by Rathjen, Buoyancy follows a spirited Cambodian teenager Chakra (Sarm Heng) who works the rice fields with his family but is looking for independence. He seeks the help of a local broker who said that they can get him paid work in a Thai factory. He heads to Thailand in hopes to find his fortuitous independence but when he gets there, he and his newfound friend Kea (Mony Ros), discover they’ve been duped. Along with other Cambodians and Burmese, they
See full article at Deadline »

The Knife Mark 20th Anniversary With Reissues, Remixes

The Knife Mark 20th Anniversary With Reissues, Remixes
The Knife will mark their 20th anniversary with a series of digital and vinyl reissue as well as some previously unavailable music.

Mute released the Swedish duo’s first single “Heartbeats” on August 15th, 2000, and on that same date 20 years later the label will release a batch of Knife material, including nearly a dozen remixes on digital services for the first time.

The Knife: Live at Terminal 5 will also be available on vinyl in North America for the first time, as well as a digital release for the duo’s
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Quibi Developing Couple Dramedy ‘Heartbeats’ From ‘Everything Sucks’ Creators

Quibi Developing Couple Dramedy ‘Heartbeats’ From ‘Everything Sucks’ Creators
Exclusive: Quibi has put in development Heartbeats, a scripted dramedy from Everything Sucks creators Michael Mohan and Ben York Jones, eOne and Hypnotic.

Written by Mohan and Jones and directed by Mohan, Heartbeats follows the “perfect couple,” Kristen and Bobby, as they navigate the aftermath of their surprising and emotional break up. Told from the perspective of the viewer as their mutual friend, Heartbeats shows what can happen when the right person comes into your life at the wrong time.

eOne and Hypnotic co-produce. eOne is the studio.

Mohan and Jones created dramedy Everything Sucks, which aired for one season on Netflix. Jones co-wrote 2011 feature Like Crazy. Mohan is in post-production on thriller film The Voyeurs, which he wrote and directed.

Quibi launches on April 6.
See full article at Deadline »

Top 150 Most Anticipated Foreign Films of 2020: #69. Suzanna Andler – Benoît Jacquot

Suzanna Andler

Benoît Jacquot, who rarely lets the earth circle the sun without unveiling a new project, turns to Marguerite Duras for inspiration for his next film, Suzanna Andler, based on the famed writer’s 1968 play. Charlotte Gainsbourg, reuniting with Jacquot after 2014’s 3 Hearts, headlines the film, produced by the director’s long-time collaborator Kristina Larsen. Hard-working Niels Schneider, co-stars. Having directed films since the mid-1970s, Jacquot has had an increasingly strong festival presence in his later years. He’s competed in Cannes once, with 1998’s The School of Flesh, returning to the festival in Un Certain Regard in 2004 with A Tout de Suite and in 2016 as co-director of the documentary Gentleman Rissient (out of competition).…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

'Back Home' ('Revenir'): Film Review | Venice 2019

'Back Home' ('Revenir'): Film Review | Venice 2019
A Frenchman in his early thirties returns to the farm of his childhood in the rural family drama Back Home (Revenir), a suitably down-to-earth adaptation of a work by French novelist Serge Joncour. It is the first feature from Paris-born filmmaker Jessica Palud, a former assistant director who has worked on several features from one of France’s greatest humanist filmmakers, Philippe Lioret (Welcome, All Our Desires). Lioret actually produced the film and also co-wrote the script with Palud and mono-monikered screenwriter Diasteme (Angel Face).

Former Xavier Dolan muse Niels Schneider (Heartbeats) and Blue Is the Warmest Color breakout Adele ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Cannes Review: ‘Matthias & Maxime’ is an Unnervingly Mute Study of Contrasts

Of the many labels Xavier Dolan’s Matthias & Maxime came attached with ahead of its Cannes premiere, few felt as apt as those that billed the Canadian’s eighth feature as “a return.” Three years after railing at Cannes’ “culture of hatred” for the mauling his Grand Prix winner It’s Only The End of the World received from critics–and less than one since the even bigger misfire The Death and Life of John F. Donovan bowed in Toronto–Matthias & Maxime shipped Xavier Dolan back to the festival that first welcomed him in 2009, when his I Killed My Mother left the Directors’ Fortnight with a Camera d’Or for best first feature. Homing in on two best friends grappling with a sprawling bromance, Matthias & Maxime also promised to dwell into the non-heteronormative dynamics Dolan had explored at length since his debut. And after two features set abroad, (the France-quartered
See full article at The Film Stage »

Cannes Correspondences #10: Friendly Kisses and Inseparable Sisters

The Notebook is covering Cannes with an on-going correspondence between critic Leonardo Goi and editor Daniel Kasman.Matthias & MaximeDear Danny, How nice it was to read your glowing words on Bong Joon-ho’s Palme d’Or contender. His Parasite belongs, together with a handful of other main competition entries, to a list of Cannes titles I shall be catching up on Saturday, when the festival will run a few repeat screenings ahead of the awards ceremony. With a program as rich and tantalizing as this year’s, it’s virtually impossible not to let a few titles slip past you. And while I may have postponed my rendezvous with the likes of Céline Sciamma, Pedro Almodóvar, and Bong Joon-ho, I did make sure to catch the homecoming of one of Cannes’ youngest regulars, Xavier Dolan. Ever since his 2009 debut feature I Killed My Mother, which found a spot at the 2009 Directors’ Fortnight,
See full article at MUBI »

Cannes Multi-Prize Champ Xavier Dolan On ‘Matthias And Maxime’: ‘The Film Is Not Gay, It’s Life’

Cannes Multi-Prize Champ Xavier Dolan On ‘Matthias And Maxime’: ‘The Film Is Not Gay, It’s Life’
Quebec wunderkind filmmaker Xavier Dolan, who ten years ago at the age of 20 arrived at Cannes and knocked their socks off with I Killed My Mother, returns to the Croisette with Matthias and Maxime about two young childhood male friends, who after a kiss as adults, begin to question their true feelings.

As a filmmaker Dolan’s canon is famed for its homosexual themes and mothers of varying personalities. In Matthias and Maxime, the latter character is about to leave home for a trip to Australia and has to contend with a sick, abusive mother as he tries to leave her in the care of a guardian. How bad is mom? Despite her son’s good intentions, she throws a can at his head.

Said Dolan today at the Cannes press conference for the film, “Many say they recognize mothers and homosexuality in my films. In regards to mothers, we all have one,
See full article at Deadline »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Matthias & Maxime’

Cannes Film Review: ‘Matthias & Maxime’
If there’s one term that Xavier Dolan probably never wants or needs to hear again, it’s “enfant terrible.” Irresistible to use when the Québécois auteur was 19, rattling out of the gate with his antsy, angry lash-out of a debut, “I Killed My Mother,” it’s followed him doggedly through a series of variously spiky, variably strong follow-up features. But Dolan has just turned 30, and with his eighth film, “Matthias & Maxime,” capping a filmography longer and more entrenched in its creative identity than many directors comfortably his senior, it seems time to put the label to rest. For “Matthias & Maxime” is not in any sense the work of an enfant terrible: A wistful, low-key love-and-friendship study, and something of a back-to-basics reset after his elaborate English-language misfire “The Death and Life of John P. Donovan,” it feels at once younger and older, sweeter and more seasoned, than Dolan’s last few films.
See full article at Variety »

Cannes Film Review: ‘A Brother’s Love’

Despite all her evident idiosyncrasies, there’s something familiar about Sophia (Anne Élisabeth Bossé), the focus of Quebecois debutante Monia Chokri’s comedy “A Brother’s Love,” which gets the Un Certain Regard sidebar of Cannes off to a springy if overlong and somewhat stumbling start. Sophia may have a PhD in political philosophy but she lives a remarkably unexamined life. And in that she is enabled by a co-dependent relationship with her attractive psychologist brother Karim (Patrick Hivon) which traps them both in an eternally arrested state of emotional adolescence. The familiarity springs from a realisation that the male version of Sophia’s character is such a common staple of the modern comedy as to be nearly a cliché: the lovable manchild whose emotional immaturity is actually part of his charm.

However these traits distilled into a woman by Chokri’s promising if overindulgent screenplay and Bossé’s admirably uncompromised performance,
See full article at Variety »

'A Brother's Love' ('La femme de mon frere'): Film Review | Cannes 2019

'A Brother's Love' ('La femme de mon frere'): Film Review | Cannes 2019
A thirtysomething’s platonic love for her brother knows no bounds, which puts her in an awkward position when he finally starts dating the near-perfect girl in A Brother’s Love (La femme de mon frere). Though it might sound like a pitch for a high-concept studio comedy starring Amy Schumer, this is actually the basic plot outline of the sweet, funny and somewhat melancholy feature debut from Quebec actress-turned-director Monia Chokri (of Xavier Dolan’s Heartbeats and local zombie hit Ravenous).

While there might be no belly laughs or gross-out gags, this rather meandering opening film of the Un ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Loco Films Boards ‘Paper Flag’ From Promising New Director Nathan Ambrosioni (Exclusive)

Loco Films has come on board “Paper Flag” (“Les Papiers de drapeaux”), the feature debut of 18-year old French director Nathan Ambrosioni.

The film explores the ambivalent relationship between two siblings and the concept of freedom. Guillaume Gouix (“The Returned”) stars as a young adult who has just got out of jail after 12 years of detention and bursts into the tranquile life of his younger sister, away from the city. Gouix stars opposite Noémie Merlant, who previously starred in “Once in a Lifetime” and “Heaven Will Wait.”

Loco Films is screening “Paper Flag” at the UniFrance Rendez-Vous in Paris, ahead of its launch at the European Film Market in Berlin next month. The film already won the audience prize at the La Roche-Sur-Yon Festival in France, which is spearheaded by Paolo Moretto, the new head of Cannes’s Directors Fortnight.

Laurent Danielou, the co-founder of Loco Films, told Variety that
See full article at Variety »

Has Herr Dolan Really Run Amok?

Xavier Dolan's Heartbeats (2010) is showing November 10 – December 9, 2018 on Mubi in the United States.Xavier Dolan is infatuated with image. The Louis Vuitton model makes films of meticulous composition, color, and sartorial specificity. The filmmaker’s life, as he completes a decade of making films, is well known: a wunderkind-cum-enfant terrible, Dolan made his first film at nineteen. The film, I Killed My Mother (2009), played at the Directors’ Fortnight in Cannes, where he’s become a house cat amongst toms, racking up prestigious awards and adulation while arrayed in the finest of fashion—the man has style. Somewhere along his ascent the critical discourse began to curdle. Flaws and weaknesses (excessive fealty to Wong Kar-wai and overly-simplistic character dynamics) in his first few films were absolved under the auspices of youthful promise. Critics and viewers were excited to discover a new cine-stylist, but around the time of Mommy (2014) the pools of disfavor began to form.
See full article at MUBI »

Best Cannes Directors of the 21st Century

  • Indiewire
Best Cannes Directors of the 21st Century
There’s nothing like a rousing walk up the Cannes red carpet, flashbulbs exploding, plus lengthy standing ovations after the premiere, to feed a filmmaker’s hungry ego. Although the world’s most glamorous film festival can be reticent to anoint new auteurs before they are given credit elsewhere, each year’s 20 directors competing for the Palme d’Or each comprise a class photo of master filmmakers with a far reach; they know building your foreign profile improves global box office returns.

Cannes Film Festival director Thierry Frémaux and his predecessor, Gilles Jacob, have nurtured generations of working auteurs. Check out the IndieWire film staff’s countdown of 25 living directors who have thrilled and stirred us on the Croisette this century, undaunted by rigid festival etiquette and the massive international stage.

25. Lee Chang-dong

Lars von Trier may grab more headlines, but the real reason to get excited about this year
See full article at Indiewire »

Xavier Dolan Says ‘The Death and Life of John F. Donovan’ Was Accepted to Cannes, But They Decided Not to Go — Exclusive

Xavier Dolan Says ‘The Death and Life of John F. Donovan’ Was Accepted to Cannes, But They Decided Not to Go — Exclusive
When the Cannes Film Festival announced its 2018 lineup on Thursday, one movie that seemed like an obvious inclusion wasn’t on the list: Xavier Dolan’s “The Death and Life of John F. Donovan.” The prolific 29-year-old French-Canadian filmmaker’s first English-language feature is his most ambitious to date, the story of an American television star (Kit Harrington) dealing with the aftermath of revelations surrounding a relationship with an 11-year-old boy.

Dolan’s movie went into production in the summer of 2016, and after a delay, Dolan finished shooting in early 2017. It seemed like a safe bet for Cannes, where five out of his six completed features have played. The movie has been beset by post-production delays, including a February 2018 update when Dolan announced that he would be cutting Jessica Chastain’s character, a scheming journalist, from the movie. Nevertheless, Dolan told IndieWire that he did submit a version of the
See full article at Indiewire »

Xavier Dolan Announces Eighth Feature ‘Matt & Max,’ Set to Shoot This Year

Xavier Dolan Announces Eighth Feature ‘Matt & Max,’ Set to Shoot This Year
As he puts the finishing touches on his English-language debut The Death and Life of John F. Donovan–featuring the impressive ensemble of Jessica Chastain, Kit Harington, Susan Sarandon, Kathy Bates, Natalie Portman, Jacob Tremblay, Michael Gambon, and Sarah GadonXavier Dolan is going back to a more narrow scope for his follow-up.

He’ll be returning to Quebec this fall to shoot his eighth feature Matt & Max, reports THR, which is said to mix the aesthetic approach of Tom at the Farm with the spirit of Mommy. Also a return to the French language, the film will depict a pair of friends in their late 20s, with Dolan playing Max. Also among the cast is the wonderful Anne Dorval (Mommy, I Killed My Mother, Heartbeats).

“This year I’ve been exposed to films that I felt were so brave and so authentic in their writing and how they talked about queer love,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Joshua Reviews Valerie Muller And Angelin Preljocaj’s Polina [Theatrical Review]

Throughout the history of film, dance on screen has helped foster some of cinema’s most interesting works. In the earliest days of film you have works like Annabelle Serpentine Dance, which is still some of the most erotically alluring film making the medium has ever known, and up through today film has given us Gene Kelly musicals, their modern off-shoots like Step Up 3D (maybe the greatest 3D film ever produced), and even art films like those from Nathan Kroll or Carlos Saura.

However, they’re becoming more and more rare as its counterpart, the musical, goes by the wayside. So when a new film focusing on the art of the human body through the medium of dance crops up, it’s worthy of one’s intrigue. And thankfully, Polina is worthy of one’s hard earned money.

From director Valerie Muller and world renowned choreographer Angelin Preljocaj (who
See full article at CriterionCast »

‘Polina’ Trailer: Real-Life Passion and Skill Take Center Stage in Juliette Binoche Ballet Drama — Watch

For her latest film, director Valérie Müller went to the right people to help tell the story of a talented dancer who dreams of more, from her co-director Angelin Preljocaj (who is also Müller’s partner in real life) to her star, a dancing queen in her own right. The result is an energetic, honest look inside the fraught world of dance and the sort of unique people who populate it.

Read More‘Step’: How the Sundance Documentary Is Emulating ‘Hidden Figures’ to Inspire Underprivileged Kids

Shot in Russia, France, and Belgium, “Polina” follows the journey of gifted young dancer Polina — played by real-life Mariinsky Theatre Russian ballerina Anastasia Shevtsova — who has spent her childhood and youth training with a hard-driving classical ballet teacher. Polina’s long-held dreams (or perhaps her teacher’s?) seem ready to finally come to fruition when she’s accepted into Moscow’s highly competitive and prestigious Bolshoi Ballet.
See full article at Indiewire »
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